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Re: [MATH for FUN] Center of gravity geometry and time differentials.

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  • MorphemeAddict
    ... stevo ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 1, 2012
      On Sun, Jan 1, 2012 at 9:45 PM, bqllpd <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > These are two problems I haven't explored yet, but I'm hoping to
      > understand this. In doing center of mass geometry, is this the same as
      > center of gravity? In General Relativity, the point at which mass
      > gravitates toward is different than in Euclidean space because gravity
      > froma body takes time to effect another body. Suppose you have three
      > perfect spheres. Two have the same radius and are toucing at a point. The
      > third has volume and mass equal to the sum of the smaller two and has a
      > circular orbit away from the center of mass of these smaller kissing
      > spheres.
      > 1) Do the smaller spheres start to rotate about a point and
      > 2) Does the orbit of the larger sphere change from circular to elliptical?
      > 3) What if the spheres are replaced by 2-d circles on a plane.
      >
      > Another problem is something that I noticed when I first moved from
      > Southern California to Northern Oregon and back again.
      >
      > I have a fine watch that's very accurate. It gains about only 1 second per
      > year. What I noticed is that when I traveled by bus to Oregon, my watch was
      > slower by about 23 seconds after I arrived. I reset it to the atomic time
      > and it remained accurate until just a few days ago. When I arrived back in
      > So. Cal., my watch was ahead by about 23 seconds. Is there a relatavistic
      > time differential on the Earth when someone travels longitudinally?
      >
      > The short answer is No. I suspect it's also the long answer.

      stevo

      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • video_ranger
      A three body system (when the masses are similar in magnitude) is basically unstable and for most practical purposes unpredictable. Mark
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 10, 2012
        A three body system (when the masses are similar in magnitude) is basically unstable and for most practical purposes unpredictable.

        Mark

        --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, bqllpd <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > These are two problems I haven't explored yet, but I'm hoping to understand this. In doing center of mass geometry, is this the same as center of gravity? In General Relativity, the point at which mass gravitates toward is different than in Euclidean space because gravity froma body takes time to effect another body. Suppose you have three perfect spheres. Two have the same radius and are toucing at a point. The third has volume and mass equal to the sum of the smaller two and has a circular orbit away from the center of mass of these smaller kissing spheres.
        > 1) Do the smaller spheres start to rotate about a point and
        > 2) Does the orbit of the larger sphere change from circular to elliptical?
        > 3) What if the spheres are replaced by 2-d circles on a plane.
        >
        > Another problem is something that I noticed when I first moved from Southern California to Northern Oregon and back again.
        >
        > I have a fine watch that's very accurate. It gains about only 1 second per year. What I noticed is that when I traveled by bus to Oregon, my watch was slower by about 23 seconds after I arrived. I reset it to the atomic time and it remained accurate until just a few days ago. When I arrived back in So. Cal., my watch was ahead by about 23 seconds. Is there a relatavistic time differential on the Earth when someone travels longitudinally?
        >
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