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16278
Happy Pi day Happy Pi day everyone!!! The holiday that runs CIRCLES around the other holidays. So gather ROUND and dance in a RING. You can also observe the Pi minute at
richlinda6751
Mar 13
#16278
 
16277
The Actuary Exam Hell All (again), Has anyone done the Actuary Exam or works as an Actuary? What did you find difficult about the exam? Do you like working as an Actuary and
opal_rumours
Mar 13
#16277
 
16276
My Blog Hello All, I'm starting a math blog aimed at beginners and tutors. Would you please give me some feedback? It is at http://thoughtsonmath.livejournal.com/
opal_rumours
Mar 13
#16276
 
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16275
Re: One-Point Folding Yes that was the original problem and it's a good problem to consider. But it's a little more difficult than holding two opposite points fixed (along with the
video_ranger
Mar 9
#16275
 
16274
Re: One-Point Folding All this time I've been imagining pulling up on just one edge point while somehow the opposite one stayed fixed to the original plane, instead of pulling up on
MorphemeAddict
Mar 7
#16274
 
16273
Re: One-Point Folding That's interesting. It looks similar qualitatively - although the actual paper seems to me to be a bit broader or flatter than the graph at the two high points
video_ranger
Mar 6
#16273
 
16272
Re: One-Point Folding Ah, I guessed at a result and it looks decent. I put the picture that I made with Octave on my blog page, if anyone wants to take a look.
christopher arthur
Mar 6
#16272
 
16271
Re: One-Point Folding Yes - that's a good technique for solving variational problems approximately.
video_ranger
Mar 2
#16271
 
16270
Re: One-Point Folding This is tricky since we really have little idea what V is supposed to be. Maybe the idea is to guess with some function of two variables V(s,k) where s is our
christopher arthur
Mar 1
#16270
 
16269
Re: One-Point Folding I meant that to signify the square of the the norm - it wasn't very clear: (d^2V/ds^2)^2 = (x''(s))^2 + (y''(s))^2 + (z''(s))^2 where the primes mean second
video_ranger
Feb 28
#16269
 
16268
Re: One-Point Folding Yeah, I suppose that the shape reminds me of a kind of cone because of the straight lines from the fold point out to the rim. You define a vector-valued
christopher arthur
Feb 27
#16268
 
16267
Re: One-Point Folding To clarify something: consider a flat sheet of paper that becomes a curved surface in three dimensional space when held some way. At each point in the surface
video_ranger
Feb 27
#16267
 
16266
Re: One-Point Folding Here's a precise formulation of the problem slightly more faithful to your original statement: Start with a circular sheet of paper of unit radius lying flat
video_ranger
Feb 27
#16266
 
16265
Re: Can someone back me up? I'm correct and Caltech is wron! This sort of reminds me of the attitude that I noticed before I gave up on my doctorate in math. I remember telling the student advisor what I thought about
christopher arthur
Feb 24
#16265
 
16263
Re: One-Point Folding It would definitely be harder if those two points weren't opposite each other (because of the loss of symmetry). If they were at a relatively shallow angle
video_ranger
Feb 18
#16263
 
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16262
Re: One-Point Folding That's an interesting way to formalize the problem. I wonder if for some particular arrangements of P and P' the curve would be easier to calculate.
christopher arthur
Feb 17
#16262
 
16261
Re: One-Point Folding Here's a summary my thoughts on this problem so far: To simplify things assume the piece of paper is circular in shape (say with radius = 1), with the pencil
video_ranger
Feb 16
#16261
 
16260
One-Point Folding Just curious--does anybody have a clue how to write an equation for a surface like the piece of paper in my picture? here's the link to the picture:
christopher arthur
Feb 9
#16260
 
16259
Re: **** the internet Mind your own business, bqllpd. stevo
MorphemeAddict
Feb 8
#16259
 
16256
Conjecture related to ynineteen's problem Let p be a prime. Let N be the total number of permutations (T) of the p-1 numbers: 1,2,...,p-1 for which the sum: 1*T(1) + 2*T(2) + 3*T(3) + ... +
video_ranger
Jan 29
#16256
 
16255
Re: My theory is falling apart. Can someone please help? Do you think that you could write it out with symbols using something like LaTeX and then post it on the web so that we could read it that way?
christopher arthur
Jan 29
#16255
 
16253
Re: Probablity ? There are 90 so it's 1/8.
richlinda6751
Jan 27
#16253
 
16252
Re: Probablity ? Actually there are another 36 (at least) 6 digit numbers made with 1,2,3,4,5,6 that are divisible by 7, making a total of 42, so the probability would be
bogaduck
Jan 27
#16252
 
16251
Re: Probablity ? 1,2,3,4,5,6 can be written 720 different ways, true. 6 of those ways are a 6 figure number divisible by 7, true that means the probability is 6/720 or 1/120
bogaduck
Jan 27
#16251
 
16250
Probablity ? I need some help to understand probability, say we have 3 values 1 2 3 , by factorial formula 3x2x1=6 we can write it in 6 different ways, I am looking to find
ynineteen
Jan 26
#16250
 
16246
Re: Caltech won't get back to me, so I'm posing this question here. OK. If you say so, I suppose that it could be true...as for me I wouldn't dare contact even my old grad school professors again much less any other
christopher arthur
Jan 19
#16246
 
16245
Re: 'proof' that sum of all integers is -1/12 Thanks, Ashim Kar and Mark Jones. I suspected something like that, and now I know. It's been so long since I studied series. stevo
MorphemeAddict
Jan 19
#16245
 
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16244
Re: 'proof' that sum of all integers is -1/12 The goof lies in the proof that 1-1+1-1+1..... =1/2, possibly using the formula of GP having a=1 & r = -1 thus 1-1+1-1+1.... ifinite series reduces to 1/(1-r)
ashim_kar123
Jan 19
#16244
 
16243
Re: 'proof' that sum of all integers is -1/12 For anyone who doesn't want to sit through the video, here's a summary: Definitions: S = 1 + 2 + 3 + ... S1 = 1 - 1 + 1 -1 + ... S2 = 1 - 2 + 3 - 4 + ... Proof
video_ranger
Jan 19
#16243
 
16240
'proof' that sum of all integers is -1/12 In this video they claim to prove that the sum of all the natural numbers is -1/12. I don't believe it, but I don't know where the error is. Can someone here
MorphemeAddict
Jan 18
#16240
 
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