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Re: [math_club] A problem

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  • S. M. Mamun Ar Rashid
    In a card game that we typically know, there are 52 cards that make a deck in which there are 4 queens. You have drawn 2 cards: first one, then another. Since
    Message 1 of 28 , Jun 1, 2011
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      In a card game that we typically know, there are 52 cards that make a deck in which there are 4 queens.
       
      You have drawn 2 cards: first one, then another. Since it is not explicitly mentioned whether you have replaced the 1st card before drawing the 2nd card, it is appropriate to assume that you have not replaced the 1st card.
       
      Now you are looking for scenarios: EITHER 1. (1st card is queen AND 2nd card is queen), OR 2. (1st card is not queen & 2nd card is queen)
       
      Probability of scenario 1 is (4/52)*(3/51) = 12/(52.51)
      Probability of scenario 2 is (48/52)*(4/51) = 192/(52.51)
       
      Total probability = 12/(52.51) + 192/(52.51) = 204/(52.51) = 1/13
       
      Regards,
       
      S. M. Mamun Ar Rashid
       

      From: ahsabhasan <ahsabhasan@...>
      To: math_club@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, May 31, 2011 6:31:04 PM
      Subject: [math_club] A problem

       

      IF I take two cards from a deck then what is the probability of the second card to be a queen.

    • Murshid Islam
      Interestingly, the probability is the same as that of drawing one card (out of the 52) and finding a queen. Murshid
      Message 2 of 28 , Jun 1, 2011
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        Interestingly, the probability is the same as that of drawing one card (out of the 52) and finding a queen.

        Murshid







        On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 4:29 PM, S. M. Mamun Ar Rashid <mamun305@...> wrote:
         

        In a card game that we typically know, there are 52 cards that make a deck in which there are 4 queens.
         
        You have drawn 2 cards: first one, then another. Since it is not explicitly mentioned whether you have replaced the 1st card before drawing the 2nd card, it is appropriate to assume that you have not replaced the 1st card.
         
        Now you are looking for scenarios: EITHER 1. (1st card is queen AND 2nd card is queen), OR 2. (1st card is not queen & 2nd card is queen)
         
        Probability of scenario 1 is (4/52)*(3/51) = 12/(52.51)
        Probability of scenario 2 is (48/52)*(4/51) = 192/(52.51)
         
        Total probability = 12/(52.51) + 192/(52.51) = 204/(52.51) = 1/13
         
        Regards,
         
        S. M. Mamun Ar Rashid
         

        From: ahsabhasan <ahsabhasan@...>
        To: math_club@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, May 31, 2011 6:31:04 PM
        Subject: [math_club] A problem

         

        IF I take two cards from a deck then what is the probability of the second card to be a queen.


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