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RE: [maranofamilies] italians must read

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  • Spizzirri, Frank
    Very funny...but up here in Canada we call sauce sugo ...never ever heard it called gravy... ... From: Fanny Nudo [mailto:fannynudo@yahoo.com] Sent: Monday,
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2004
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      Very funny...but up here in Canada we call sauce "sugo"...never ever heard
      it called gravy...

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Fanny Nudo [mailto:fannynudo@...]
      Sent: Monday, May 31, 2004 10:14 PM
      To: maranofamilies@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [maranofamilies] italians must read


      i loved it, but hey, it's GRAVY, not sauce.

      =====
      "I don't get tough with anyone, Mr. Gittes. My lawyer does."




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    • rose pennington
      Great one! Took me right back to Aunt Rosie s house on Sundays. The whole family went there every Sunday no matter what cause it was a rule of God, and
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2004
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        Great one! Took me right back to Aunt Rosie's house
        on Sundays. The whole family went there every Sunday
        no matter what 'cause it was a rule of God, and that's
        where our Gramma lived. In those days everybody
        dressed like they did on "I Love Lucy" - except it was
        real and in living color. Those of us who were ready
        early could go to Aunt Rosie's twice on Sunday, once
        before church for the donuts that Cousin Londie had
        brought over (which were eaten after our breakfast at
        home, the best being "foo ta ta"). Donuts got served
        with the ever-present pot of fresh coffee - yeah, even
        the kids would try some, or cocoa. When you walked
        in Aunt Rosie's front door the first One to greet you
        was the Sacred Heart - in portrait form, followed by a
        crucifix, and statues of the Blessed Mother and the
        Infant of Prague, respectively, who lived on the
        fireplace mantle. I'd secretly always do an auditory
        check upon arrival - actually it started when I got
        out of the car - to listen for yelling. If there was
        none, that meant Aunt Rosie was in a good mood and it
        was sorta safe to go in. If she was mad, we'd all
        watch out but go in anyway! She didn't throw shoes,
        but was known to lob an occasional slipper instead.
        After all, who wore shoes around the house? The
        second trip to Aunt Rosie's was after church when
        everybody went back there for the real food. It would
        start with pop (soda) and Salam' for the kids, eaten
        with Gram's homemade bread - dry or maybe with mayo.
        Grownups ate next. Dad would get Cappacol' with
        Provolone (pronounce the "E") 'cause he was the pet.
        (They all were though.) The grownups would have more
        coffee and biscotti - some of which had these things
        Gram called "an eese" in them, accent on the second
        syllable. Kids now made their second visit to the
        kitchen, then ran back outside to go play dead on the
        street or have a fight. Somebody always got hurt and
        only if there was blood would the wound warrant
        attention. The tone would be high and things would be
        getting loud by the time the biscotti round was
        finished, so Gram would bring out a tin of "Sca lee
        dee" she had stashed someplace. About this time the
        first store trip would be announced. Sauce (we only
        called it that) made with the meat trinity was
        simmering. Gram never drained any grease from her
        sauce - that would have been a cardinal sin. If she
        felt like cooking we'd have homemade noodles (all
        pasta was "spaghet' except for these noodles).
        "Meat-a-balls" were served in a big bowl on the side,
        never in or on the main event. On birthdays,
        communions, confirmations, etc., we'd get "ravvies"
        made with spinach, egg, a little cheese and ground
        beef. They were really good! Once in a while there'd
        be a Lasagn', or maybe Polenta that was kinda burned
        on the bottom of the pan and served on the board or
        very rarely, baked. The stinky, hard cheese for
        grating (Parm. Reg. or Romano) would appear from a
        back room just when we'd sit down to eat. And always
        there was Gram's command, "Manga, manga," followed by
        "Take, take." Everyone had a garden - nobody would
        buy a house unless the yard would make a good garden -
        so there often were veggies served Gram or some
        relative had grown. There probably was an unspoken
        Vegetable War of the Relatives going on. Anyway, "ca
        coots" were my favorite. And we always had either
        "minestra" or "ensalade" - sometimes both. Salad, not
        cold either, was eaten after the pasta course. When I
        was very small I didn't even know there were other
        dressings besides oil and vinegar! We ate lots of
        bread with lots of butter. We used paper napkins.
        All the women really wore aprons in the kitchen. Gram
        wore one she'd made with fabric leftover from Aunt
        Rosie's kitchen curtains. Aunt Rosie wore red nail
        polish and gave kid haircuts, including mine. The
        grownups smoked non-stop and probably a few of the
        kids did too. Grownups spoke Italian half the time.
        Kids spoke English all of the time. The grownups
        wouldn't let us learn Italian 'cause they didn't want
        us to know what they were talking about. We did
        manage to figure out the swear words though. Nobody
        ate in the dining room. As you know, it was for
        Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving. You ate in the
        kitchen, in shifts, and at Aunt Rosie's the dishes
        were made of this new plastic called Melmac. They
        threw easily and were guaranteed not to break - great
        for fights. Dishes got washed continually 'cause
        nobody had that many dishes as there were people
        there. After dinner Gram would be tired, so she'd go
        sit down in the living room to watch her favorite TV
        show - Sunday night wrestling! I can still see tiny,
        little Gram ease into her rocking chair, light up a
        Panatela cigar, take a deep puff, exhale, then lean
        her head back and watch Gorgeous George wrestle. Yep,
        it was a good time to grow up.



        --- "Spizzirri, Frank" <FSpizzirri@...>
        wrote:
        > Very funny...but up here in Canada we call sauce
        > "sugo"...never ever heard
        > it called gravy...
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Fanny Nudo [mailto:fannynudo@...]
        > Sent: Monday, May 31, 2004 10:14 PM
        > To: maranofamilies@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [maranofamilies] italians must read
        >
        >
        > i loved it, but hey, it's GRAVY, not sauce.
        >
        > =====
        > "I don't get tough with anyone, Mr. Gittes. My
        > lawyer does."
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > __________________________________
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger.
        > http://messenger.yahoo.com/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ***************************************************************************
        >
        > This message, including any attachments, is
        > privileged and may contain
        > confidential information intended only for the
        > person(s) named above. Any
        > other distribution, copying or disclosure is
        > strictly prohibited.
        > Communication by email is not a secure medium and,
        > as part of the
        > transmission process, this message may be copied to
        > servers operated by
        > third parties while in transit. Unless you advise
        > us to the contrary, by
        > accepting communications that may contain your
        > personal information from us
        > via email, you are deemed to provide your consent to
        > our transmission of the
        > contents of this message in this manner. If you do
        > not want to communicate
        > with us via email, please reply to this message with
        > the word UNSUBSCRIBE in
        > the subject line. If you are not the intended
        > recipient or have received
        > this message in error, please notify us immediately
        > by reply email and
        > permanently delete the original transmission from
        > us, including any
        > attachments, without making a copy.
        >
        ***************************************************************************
        >





        __________________________________
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        Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger.
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      • Diane PATTERSON
        Rose, What a wonderful writer you are. You certainly brought back more memories for me. I am going to print this out and give it to my mom. Diane----
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2004
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          Rose, What a wonderful writer you are. You certainly brought back more
          memories for me.

          I am going to print this out and give it to my mom.

          Diane---- Original Message -----
          From: "rose pennington" <rose1ro@...>
          To: <maranofamilies@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2004 5:13 PM
          Subject: RE: [maranofamilies] italians must read


          > Great one! Took me right back to Aunt Rosie's house
          > on Sundays. The whole family went there every Sunday
          > no matter what 'cause it was a rule of God, and that's
          > where our Gramma lived. In those days everybody
          > dressed like they did on "I Love Lucy" - except it was
          > real and in living color. Those of us who were ready
          > early could go to Aunt Rosie's twice on Sunday, once
          > before church for the donuts that Cousin Londie had
          > brought over (which were eaten after our breakfast at
          > home, the best being "foo ta ta"). Donuts got served
          > with the ever-present pot of fresh coffee - yeah, even
          > the kids would try some, or cocoa. When you walked
          > in Aunt Rosie's front door the first One to greet you
          > was the Sacred Heart - in portrait form, followed by a
          > crucifix, and statues of the Blessed Mother and the
          > Infant of Prague, respectively, who lived on the
          > fireplace mantle. I'd secretly always do an auditory
          > check upon arrival - actually it started when I got
          > out of the car - to listen for yelling. If there was
          > none, that meant Aunt Rosie was in a good mood and it
          > was sorta safe to go in. If she was mad, we'd all
          > watch out but go in anyway! She didn't throw shoes,
          > but was known to lob an occasional slipper instead.
          > After all, who wore shoes around the house? The
          > second trip to Aunt Rosie's was after church when
          > everybody went back there for the real food. It would
          > start with pop (soda) and Salam' for the kids, eaten
          > with Gram's homemade bread - dry or maybe with mayo.
          > Grownups ate next. Dad would get Cappacol' with
          > Provolone (pronounce the "E") 'cause he was the pet.
          > (They all were though.) The grownups would have more
          > coffee and biscotti - some of which had these things
          > Gram called "an eese" in them, accent on the second
          > syllable. Kids now made their second visit to the
          > kitchen, then ran back outside to go play dead on the
          > street or have a fight. Somebody always got hurt and
          > only if there was blood would the wound warrant
          > attention. The tone would be high and things would be
          > getting loud by the time the biscotti round was
          > finished, so Gram would bring out a tin of "Sca lee
          > dee" she had stashed someplace. About this time the
          > first store trip would be announced. Sauce (we only
          > called it that) made with the meat trinity was
          > simmering. Gram never drained any grease from her
          > sauce - that would have been a cardinal sin. If she
          > felt like cooking we'd have homemade noodles (all
          > pasta was "spaghet' except for these noodles).
          > "Meat-a-balls" were served in a big bowl on the side,
          > never in or on the main event. On birthdays,
          > communions, confirmations, etc., we'd get "ravvies"
          > made with spinach, egg, a little cheese and ground
          > beef. They were really good! Once in a while there'd
          > be a Lasagn', or maybe Polenta that was kinda burned
          > on the bottom of the pan and served on the board or
          > very rarely, baked. The stinky, hard cheese for
          > grating (Parm. Reg. or Romano) would appear from a
          > back room just when we'd sit down to eat. And always
          > there was Gram's command, "Manga, manga," followed by
          > "Take, take." Everyone had a garden - nobody would
          > buy a house unless the yard would make a good garden -
          > so there often were veggies served Gram or some
          > relative had grown. There probably was an unspoken
          > Vegetable War of the Relatives going on. Anyway, "ca
          > coots" were my favorite. And we always had either
          > "minestra" or "ensalade" - sometimes both. Salad, not
          > cold either, was eaten after the pasta course. When I
          > was very small I didn't even know there were other
          > dressings besides oil and vinegar! We ate lots of
          > bread with lots of butter. We used paper napkins.
          > All the women really wore aprons in the kitchen. Gram
          > wore one she'd made with fabric leftover from Aunt
          > Rosie's kitchen curtains. Aunt Rosie wore red nail
          > polish and gave kid haircuts, including mine. The
          > grownups smoked non-stop and probably a few of the
          > kids did too. Grownups spoke Italian half the time.
          > Kids spoke English all of the time. The grownups
          > wouldn't let us learn Italian 'cause they didn't want
          > us to know what they were talking about. We did
          > manage to figure out the swear words though. Nobody
          > ate in the dining room. As you know, it was for
          > Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving. You ate in the
          > kitchen, in shifts, and at Aunt Rosie's the dishes
          > were made of this new plastic called Melmac. They
          > threw easily and were guaranteed not to break - great
          > for fights. Dishes got washed continually 'cause
          > nobody had that many dishes as there were people
          > there. After dinner Gram would be tired, so she'd go
          > sit down in the living room to watch her favorite TV
          > show - Sunday night wrestling! I can still see tiny,
          > little Gram ease into her rocking chair, light up a
          > Panatela cigar, take a deep puff, exhale, then lean
          > her head back and watch Gorgeous George wrestle. Yep,
          > it was a good time to grow up.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- "Spizzirri, Frank" <FSpizzirri@...>
          > wrote:
          > > Very funny...but up here in Canada we call sauce
          > > "sugo"...never ever heard
          > > it called gravy...
          > >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: Fanny Nudo [mailto:fannynudo@...]
          > > Sent: Monday, May 31, 2004 10:14 PM
          > > To: maranofamilies@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: [maranofamilies] italians must read
          > >
          > >
          > > i loved it, but hey, it's GRAVY, not sauce.
          > >
          > > =====
          > > "I don't get tough with anyone, Mr. Gittes. My
          > > lawyer does."
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > __________________________________
          > > Do you Yahoo!?
          > > Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger.
          > > http://messenger.yahoo.com/
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          ***************************************************************************
          > >
          > > This message, including any attachments, is
          > > privileged and may contain
          > > confidential information intended only for the
          > > person(s) named above. Any
          > > other distribution, copying or disclosure is
          > > strictly prohibited.
          > > Communication by email is not a secure medium and,
          > > as part of the
          > > transmission process, this message may be copied to
          > > servers operated by
          > > third parties while in transit. Unless you advise
          > > us to the contrary, by
          > > accepting communications that may contain your
          > > personal information from us
          > > via email, you are deemed to provide your consent to
          > > our transmission of the
          > > contents of this message in this manner. If you do
          > > not want to communicate
          > > with us via email, please reply to this message with
          > > the word UNSUBSCRIBE in
          > > the subject line. If you are not the intended
          > > recipient or have received
          > > this message in error, please notify us immediately
          > > by reply email and
          > > permanently delete the original transmission from
          > > us, including any
          > > attachments, without making a copy.
          > >
          >
          ***************************************************************************
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > __________________________________
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger.
          > http://messenger.yahoo.com/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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