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RE: [maranofamilies] Language Question - catasto

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  • Lisa Perkins
    Hi all, I figured out some of the abbreviations used on the Catasto records. What I thought said brate was really a shortened form of bracciale. I have
    Message 1 of 67 , Nov 2, 2005
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      Hi all,
      I figured out some of the abbreviations used on the
      Catasto records. What I thought said "brate" was
      really a shortened form of bracciale.

      I have another question:

      I have found at least two men with the occupation
      "stroppio". Stroppiare means "to rub". Could these
      people be masseuse'? (I probably spelled that wrong -
      "massagers")

      Lisa




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    • Lisa Perkins
      Dear Michael, Thank you for passing along your inquiry of your teacher. I do concur with the conclusion. It seems as if the Casata reference is explaining
      Message 67 of 67 , Nov 7, 2005
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        Dear Michael,
        Thank you for passing along your inquiry of your
        teacher. I do concur with the conclusion. It seems
        as if the Casata reference is explaining the presense
        of another married family in the residence.

        I have completed all the regular residents of the
        town. I now have to transcribe the foreigners, the
        widows and the virgins.

        Lisa

        --- Michael Rolland <mrolland@...> wrote:

        > Buon giorno tutti,
        >
        > I was thinking about the "casato" question and
        > wanted to bring in some
        > expert advice. I am on quite friendly terms with
        > the "professoressa"
        > that taught my my basic Italian courses - she's a
        > native Toscana - and
        > we still keep in touch via email, so I posed the
        > question to her. She
        > responded and gave me some advice that seems to make
        > perfect sense.
        >
        > She said that the modern, standard Italian usage of
        > the word "casato"
        > is, as Lisa and the rest of us discovered,
        > "lineage." Usually it would
        > be a "sostantivo" (noun), and would be used to refer
        > to a noble family.
        >
        > However, in our case it seems that the word is being
        > used as an adjective.
        >
        > In that case the former translation would not apply.
        > There is no
        > standard, modern Italian meaning of "casato" as an
        > adjective.
        >
        > She said that the only thing that comes to her mind
        > seeing the word used
        > as an adjective would be as an antiquated or
        > dialectal form of the
        > modern Italian word "accasato" or "accasata,"
        > derived from the word
        > "casa," house. Today this is considered an informal
        > or dialectal word,
        > and it's used to indicate that a person is married
        > and "at home" with
        > his or her spouse.
        >
        > But as Lisa found it, it could also mean that this
        > "figlio casato" or
        > "sorella casata" lives in the house of the person to
        > whom the record
        > refers. So, for example, the "sorella casata," for
        > example, might mean
        > the sister of the head of the household, who lives
        > with him.
        >
        > My teacher said that she might be able to come up
        > with a more precise
        > meaning, or be able to tell us with more certainty
        > whether this is the
        > correct interpretation, if she saw the full context
        > that the word
        > appears in.
        >
        > Lisa, I hope this helps. It certainly makes sense
        > to me, and I feel a
        > bit silly for not having thouhgt of this possibility
        > myself.
        >
        > I changed my email address, and so for a while I
        > wasn't seeing these
        > messages - I'm glad to see that you received the
        > CD-ROM, and the
        > indexing is going well! This is very exciting. If
        > you need any help
        > with the indexing or any other records in Italian, I
        > might be able to do
        > some for you - I speak passable Italian and have
        > plenty of help on had
        > in the form of a few native-speaker friends.
        > Anything I can do to
        > contribute to this research, I'm more than willing!
        > Just let me know.
        >
        > A presto,
        >
        > - Michael Rolland
        >
        > Lisa Perkins wrote:
        >
        > >I have found two occurances of a form of the word
        > >"casata/o"
        > >
        > >One occurance is "sorella (sister) casata" and the
        > >other occurence is "figlio (son) casato".
        > >
        > >I looked up casata and the definition is "lineage".
        > I
        > >am wondering if anyone knows whether this word may
        > be
        > >used to convey a step relationship?
        > >
        > >Lisa
        > >
        > >
        > >
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        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >




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