Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

I hope I'm not too late to be getting anything out of this.

Expand Messages
  • microguyalso
    I bought a MS 100 (DET1 I think) a while back simply because I was looking for the parts. (case, LCD, keyboard etc...) What I had planned on doing was ripping
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 6, 2006
      I bought a MS 100 (DET1 I think) a while back simply because I was
      looking for the parts. (case, LCD, keyboard etc...)

      What I had planned on doing was ripping out the main board and
      replacing it with one of my own design.

      But after finding out that this is a Z-80 based system (what I had
      planned to use), it'd be really nice to be able to use it as is.

      So what *I* would like to do is re-blast the system to make it a
      simple, single board computer, with (to start) machine code entry,
      then use that (plus a PC) to get it up to a system that could enter
      regular Z-80 assembler, then compile and run.

      (I guess connect it to a PC to blast the code to the MS and then boot
      it up, then I can use the keyboard from there)

      I don't want fancy-schmancy email or anything. Just run simple code.
      Although using the ports and modem later for stuff is certianly an
      option later.

      Anything close to that out there or am I better off ripping everything
      out and putting my own guts in there??

      Thanks, and thanks for the work done up til now, I'm pretty impressed
      with the level of work done on this thing.
    • Neil Morrison
      Have you looked at the old messages and the files? Neil ... From: microguyalso I bought a MS 100 (DET1 I think) a while back simply because I was looking for
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 6, 2006
         
        Have you looked at the old messages and the files?
         
        Neil
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----

        I bought a MS 100 (DET1 I think) a while back simply because I was
        looking for the parts. (case, LCD, keyboard etc...)

        What I had planned on doing was ripping out the main board and
        replacing it with one of my own design.

        But after finding out that this is a Z-80 based system (what I had
        planned to use), it'd be really nice to be able to use it as is.

        So what *I* would like to do is re-blast the system to make it a
        simple, single board computer, with (to start) machine code entry,
        then use that (plus a PC) to get it up to a system that could enter
        regular Z-80 assembler, then compile and run.

        (I guess connect it to a PC to blast the code to the MS and then boot
        it up, then I can use the keyboard from there)

        I don't want fancy-schmancy email or anything. Just run simple code.
        Although using the ports and modem later for stuff is certianly an
        option later.

        Anything close to that out there or am I better off ripping everything
        out and putting my own guts in there??

        Thanks, and thanks for the work done up til now, I'm pretty impressed
        with the level of work done on this thing.

        .

      • John R.
        Yes, there is a target debugger in the files section. -- John.
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 7, 2006
          Yes, there is a target debugger in the files section.

          -- John.
        • Cyrano Jones
          ... Blast away! But unless you are a reeeeeally good programmer, and won t need to reflash a second (or 498th) time, you will want to be careful to not erase
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 7, 2006
            --- In mailstation@yahoogroups.com, "microguyalso" <jack@...> wrote:

            > So what *I* would like to do is re-blast the system to make it a
            > simple, single board computer, with (to start) machine code entry,
            > then use that (plus a PC) to get it up to a system that could enter
            > regular Z-80 assembler, then compile and run.

            Blast away! But unless you are a reeeeeally good programmer, and
            won't need to reflash a second (or 498th) time, you will want to
            be careful to not erase the reflash code. :-)

            In the files section there is a remote debugger (mailbug) which is
            still a work in "progress" (ha ha ha). The currently posted
            version (0.0.3, I think) will let you install a program called
            "sboot" into the mailstation codeflash. After sboot is flashed,
            mailbug will use it (sboot) to load the remote half of the debugger,
            called "mbug" into mailstation RAM. Together, mailbug and mbug
            give you access to the mailstation hardware. You can load code
            into the RAM and execute it, or flash it somewhere in codeflash.

            With sboot flashed into your codeflash, you will need to keep
            your mailstation connected to your PC (via parallel laplink cable),
            because all sboot knows how to do is load mbug over laplink.
            You can test your code in ram, or flash it to high codeflash
            page, but you will need the PC and mailbug to execute it.

            You could always overwrite sboot with a jump to your new code
            after you've tested it, but then, unless you leave some kind of
            back door, you won't be able to flash any newer version of
            your code.

            I was kicking around various ideas on how a next version of sboot
            would work, (in particular I wanted it to both be able to boot
            directly to your new code without PC attached, and still give
            mailbug access if PC was attached), when I figured out enough
            about how the mailstation apps work to write a simple app.

            I wrote an app that just dumped the codeflash over the laplink.
            Pretty cool! (At least I thought so.) The only problem was
            I had to enter it via the mailstations hex editor. Why not
            use mailbug to load it, you may ask. Because installing
            sboot entails erasing the mailstation codeflash. And you can't
            dump it after it's erased. :-)

            Mailbug, in addition to the remote debug type of functions,
            has a few functions that work with stock mailstation (read
            serial number, reflash code, load splash screen data).
            I started to add function to catch the dump over laplink,
            but before I got it polished up, I decided a better
            idea would be to just load a version of sboot as an app.
            I actually poked in a shortened version of sboot, about
            150 bytes, with the hex editor. It worked, sort of. But
            entering with hex editor was kind of tedious.

            Then I had a brainstorm! Why not embed the app in the splash
            screen data!!! Then I'd only need to type enough bytes
            with hex editor (in the app space) to jump to the splash screen!
            That works, but there is still a bit of work to do to get
            mailbug to sync up with the "bootapp".

            I got side-tracked from that a couple of months ago, when
            I found an example showing how to control the parallel port
            from windows, (theoretically including XP). So, for
            the last several weeks, I have been converting mailbug
            to a win32 application. Just about 3 days ago, I got
            this version to "talk to the port", but I've only tested
            under 98 so far. The dll is supposed to work with any
            version of windows, I just don't have NT, 2000, or XP.

            There is still a whole lot to do to get it working with all
            the functionality of the DOS version. Things like project
            selection, and file selection were somewhat crude in last
            version, but they use standard open dialogs now. Yay.

            > Thanks, and thanks for the work done up til now, I'm
            > pretty impressed with the level of work done on this
            > thing.

            :-)


            --
            CJ
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.