Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Where to start ?

Expand Messages
  • benjaminmaggi
    I ve brought MailStation model DET1 with the hope to start puting my own programs in it, but i dont know where to start, what cable conections i need to
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 11, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I've brought MailStation model DET1 with the hope to start puting my
      own programs in it, but i dont know where to start, what cable
      conections i need to transfer the programs and data, how to show
      hidden menues, or what programs do i need to send and compile my
      programs for the mcu.
    • Cyrano Jones
      ... Mailbug is a program I wrote that will let you load & run your own code, in either the mailstation flash or ram.
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- "benjaminmaggi" <benjaminmaggi@...> wrote:

        > I've brought MailStation model DET1 with the hope to start puting my
        > own programs in it, but i dont know where to start,

        Mailbug is a program I wrote that will let you load & run
        your own code, in either the mailstation flash or ram.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mailstation/files/Mailbug/mailbug_0.0.3/

        > what cable conections i need to transfer the programs and data,

        A parallel-laplink cable.

        > how to show hidden menues,

        On the older DET1 models, you power up while holding
        down <fn><sh><t> until you see the test mode menu.

        You don't need this menu to install and use mailbug
        version 0.0.3.

        Installing sboot.rom (required with mailbug 0.0.3) will
        wipe out most of the original firmware in your mailstation.
        If you would like to keep your original firmware intact,
        you might want to wait for version 0.0.4 (hopefully
        ready in just a few more days).

        > or what programs do i need to send and compile my
        > programs for the mcu.

        There is no compiler yet. Can you program in z80 assembler?

        A free cross-assembler (as80) is in the file area, under mailbug
        directory. There is also a "hello world" example.

        --CJ
      • John R. Hogerhuis
        ... Well there are lots of C and Pascal compilers for Z80. Most of them need to run under a CP/M emulator and target a CP/M environment, but whether generated
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          On Sun, 2006-03-12 at 11:29 +0000, Cyrano Jones wrote:
          > --- "benjaminmaggi" <benjaminmaggi@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I've brought MailStation model DET1 with the hope to start puting my
          > > own programs in it, but i dont know where to start,

          > There is no compiler yet. Can you program in z80 assembler?
          >
          > A free cross-assembler (as80) is in the file area, under mailbug
          > directory. There is also a "hello world" example.


          Well there are lots of C and Pascal compilers for Z80. Most of them need
          to run under a CP/M emulator and target a CP/M environment, but whether
          generated code is dependent on the environment is usually a function of
          the nature of the code itself, not the compiler.

          There's also sdcc which comes with full source code.
          http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/

          To my knowledge no one has used these with Mailstation yet. If you want
          to generate short swaths of code I think you wouldn't have to do
          anything special. If you want to use the standard library they provide,
          you'll need to modify them so that they use the built in I/O routines or
          you need to write your own i/o routines.

          -- John.
        • benjaminmaggi
          ... Thanks ! I ve used parallax 8051 assembler to make my pic programs in the past so im going to see if AS80 works for me, im not shure about the C or pascal
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In mailstation@yahoogroups.com, "Cyrano Jones"
            <cyranojones_lalp@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- "benjaminmaggi" <benjaminmaggi@> wrote:
            >
            > > I've brought MailStation model DET1 with the hope to start puting my
            > > own programs in it, but i dont know where to start,
            >
            > Mailbug is a program I wrote that will let you load & run
            > your own code, in either the mailstation flash or ram.
            >
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mailstation/files/Mailbug/mailbug_0.0.3/
            >
            > > what cable conections i need to transfer the programs and data,
            >
            > A parallel-laplink cable.
            >
            > > how to show hidden menues,
            >
            > On the older DET1 models, you power up while holding
            > down <fn><sh><t> until you see the test mode menu.
            >
            > You don't need this menu to install and use mailbug
            > version 0.0.3.
            >
            > Installing sboot.rom (required with mailbug 0.0.3) will
            > wipe out most of the original firmware in your mailstation.
            > If you would like to keep your original firmware intact,
            > you might want to wait for version 0.0.4 (hopefully
            > ready in just a few more days).
            >
            > > or what programs do i need to send and compile my
            > > programs for the mcu.
            >
            > There is no compiler yet. Can you program in z80 assembler?
            >
            > A free cross-assembler (as80) is in the file area, under mailbug
            > directory. There is also a "hello world" example.
            >
            > --CJ
            >


            Thanks !
            I've used parallax 8051 assembler to make my pic programs in the past
            so im going to see if AS80 works for me, im not shure about the C or
            pascal compilers.
            So i hook up my laplink cable, then load mbug (in msdos) and then i
            power on my DTE1, im i right thats the procedure ?
          • Cyrano Jones
            ... What you said finally sunk in to my brain today. I don t think we would need the putchar or getchar routines at all, as long as we are not writing an
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 31, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              --- About 4 months ago, "John R. Hogerhuis" <jhoger@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Sun, 2006-03-12 at 11:29 +0000, Cyrano Jones wrote:
              > > --- "benjaminmaggi" <benjaminmaggi@> wrote:
              > >
              > > > I've brought MailStation model DET1 with the hope to start puting my
              > > > own programs in it, but i dont know where to start,
              >
              > > There is no compiler yet. Can you program in z80 assembler?
              > >
              > > A free cross-assembler (as80) is in the file area, under mailbug
              > > directory. There is also a "hello world" example.
              >
              >
              > Well there are lots of C and Pascal compilers for Z80. Most of them need
              > to run under a CP/M emulator and target a CP/M environment, but whether
              > generated code is dependent on the environment is usually a function of
              > the nature of the code itself, not the compiler.
              >
              > There's also sdcc which comes with full source code.
              > http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/
              >
              > To my knowledge no one has used these with Mailstation yet. If you want
              > to generate short swaths of code I think you wouldn't have to do
              > anything special. If you want to use the standard library they provide,
              > you'll need to modify them so that they use the built in I/O routines or
              > you need to write your own i/o routines.
              >
              > -- John.

              What you said finally sunk in to my brain today. I don't think we would
              need the putchar or getchar routines at all, as long as we are not writing
              an old-fashioned-user-interface style program. (O-FUI????) <lmao>

              If you are writing an event-driven GUI style app, you don't ever
              do any input yourself. The OS receives the input, and packages up the
              keystrokes from the keyboard (and input from other devices) and
              passes them to your program as *parameters* in calls to your apps
              event-handler. You would never call getchar.

              This is the format for the mailstations event records:
              (who, signal, this, that)

              "who" is the app number that the event is for.
              "signal" is the event type (such as keydown, keyup, etc).
              "this" and "that" are the data payload that go with the particular event.
              In the case of key events, "this" is scancode, and "that" is ascii.

              A mailstation app is basically an event handler. The mailstation
              OS passes these parameters to your apps event handler:
              handleevent(who, state, signal, this, that);

              "state" is a single byte state variable that the OS keeps track of
              for your app, between calls to handleevent. (handleevent returns
              this "state" on exit as the function result.)
              The other four parameters are the event.

              --CJ
            • John R.
              On 7/31/06, Cyrano Jones ... CLI (command line interface) ... True. ... Come to think of it, what program isn t? ;-) ... I
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 31, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                On 7/31/06, Cyrano Jones <cyranojones_lalp@...>
                > What you said finally sunk in to my brain today. I don't think we would
                > need the putchar or getchar routines at all, as long as we are not writing
                > an old-fashioned-user-interface style program. (O-FUI????) <lmao>


                CLI (command line interface)

                >
                > If you are writing an event-driven GUI style app, you don't ever
                > do any input yourself. The OS receives the input, and packages up the
                > keystrokes from the keyboard (and input from other devices) and
                > passes them to your program as *parameters* in calls to your apps
                > event-handler. You would never call getchar.
                >

                True.

                > This is the format for the mailstations event records:
                > (who, signal, this, that)
                >
                > "who" is the app number that the event is for.
                > "signal" is the event type (such as keydown, keyup, etc).
                > "this" and "that" are the data payload that go with the particular event.
                > In the case of key events, "this" is scancode, and "that" is ascii.
                >
                > A mailstation app is basically an event handler.

                Come to think of it, what program isn't? ;-)

                > "state" is a single byte state variable that the OS keeps track of
                > for your app, between calls to handleevent. (handleevent returns
                > this "state" on exit as the function result.)

                I typically call this state a "cookie" or "(execution) context." The
                server/kernel/OS lets you register it with the system and it just
                returns it to the client application as-is. I would guess it is fairly
                easy to trade the cookie for a memory pointer which holds the rest of
                the application's state (object oriented types would call this memory
                "Self" or "This").

                -- John.
              • Gary Clouse
                There are a few cross-compiler versions of small-C that run under dos and output target code for various 8 bit cpus. Have to look around for one. ...
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 1, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  There are a few cross-compiler versions of small-C
                  that run under dos and output target code for various
                  8 bit cpus. Have to look around for one.

                  --- Cyrano Jones <cyranojones_lalp@...> wrote:

                  > --- About 4 months ago, "John R. Hogerhuis"
                  > <jhoger@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > On Sun, 2006-03-12 at 11:29 +0000, Cyrano Jones
                  > wrote:
                  > > > --- "benjaminmaggi" <benjaminmaggi@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > > I've brought MailStation model DET1 with the
                  > hope to start puting my
                  > > > > own programs in it, but i dont know where to
                  > start,
                  > >
                  > > > There is no compiler yet. Can you program in
                  > z80 assembler?
                  > > >
                  > > > A free cross-assembler (as80) is in the file
                  > area, under mailbug
                  > > > directory. There is also a "hello world"
                  > example.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Well there are lots of C and Pascal compilers for
                  > Z80. Most of them need
                  > > to run under a CP/M emulator and target a CP/M
                  > environment, but whether
                  > > generated code is dependent on the environment is
                  > usually a function of
                  > > the nature of the code itself, not the compiler.
                  > >
                  > > There's also sdcc which comes with full source
                  > code.
                  > > http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/
                  > >
                  > > To my knowledge no one has used these with
                  > Mailstation yet. If you want
                  > > to generate short swaths of code I think you
                  > wouldn't have to do
                  > > anything special. If you want to use the standard
                  > library they provide,
                  > > you'll need to modify them so that they use the
                  > built in I/O routines or
                  > > you need to write your own i/o routines.
                  > >
                  > > -- John.
                  >
                  > What you said finally sunk in to my brain today. I
                  > don't think we would
                  > need the putchar or getchar routines at all, as long
                  > as we are not writing
                  > an old-fashioned-user-interface style program.
                  > (O-FUI????) <lmao>
                  >
                  > If you are writing an event-driven GUI style app,
                  > you don't ever
                  > do any input yourself. The OS receives the input,
                  > and packages up the
                  > keystrokes from the keyboard (and input from other
                  > devices) and
                  > passes them to your program as *parameters* in calls
                  > to your apps
                  > event-handler. You would never call getchar.
                  >
                  > This is the format for the mailstations event
                  > records:
                  > (who, signal, this, that)
                  >
                  > "who" is the app number that the event is for.
                  > "signal" is the event type (such as keydown, keyup,
                  > etc).
                  > "this" and "that" are the data payload that go with
                  > the particular event.
                  > In the case of key events, "this" is scancode, and
                  > "that" is ascii.
                  >
                  > A mailstation app is basically an event handler.
                  > The mailstation
                  > OS passes these parameters to your apps event
                  > handler:
                  > handleevent(who, state, signal, this, that);
                  >
                  > "state" is a single byte state variable that the OS
                  > keeps track of
                  > for your app, between calls to handleevent.
                  > (handleevent returns
                  > this "state" on exit as the function result.)
                  > The other four parameters are the event.
                  >
                  > --CJ
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  http://mail.yahoo.com
                • John R.
                  ... SDCC, a C compiler, : http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/ It already targets Z80. -- John.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 2, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On 8/1/06, Gary Clouse <niklaus37217@...> wrote:
                    > There are a few cross-compiler versions of small-C
                    > that run under dos and output target code for various
                    > 8 bit cpus. Have to look around for one.
                    >

                    SDCC, a C compiler, : http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/

                    It already targets Z80.

                    -- John.
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.