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Re: [magnifiers] Screen Magnification for UNIX

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  • Steven Whatley
    ... Oh, BTW, it does both text cursor and mouse tracking except if your are using XEmacs. Emacs does its own cursor movement and not the standeard X system
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 12, 2002
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      On Tue, 12 Mar 2002, Steven Whatley wrote:
      > http://www.arc.umn.edu/gvl-software/puff/

      Oh, BTW, it does both text cursor and mouse tracking except if your are
      using XEmacs. Emacs does its own cursor movement and not the standeard X
      system calls.

      Later,
      Steven
    • Steven Whatley
      ... I think it would be good for people to go to the offical site so those folks knows there are people are still interested in their Puff program. Or go to
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 12, 2002
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        On Tue, 12 Mar 2002, Peter Verhoeven wrote:
        > http://www.magnifiers.org/cgi-bin/links/jump.cgi?ID=127

        I think it would be good for people to go to the "offical" site so those
        folks knows there are people are still interested in their Puff program.
        Or go to both places. :)
      • John Nissen
        Hello Stuart, We have ported our WordAloud assistive reader from Windows to LINUX. It reads text or web pages, with a word-at-a-time display and speech
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 14, 2002
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          Hello Stuart,

          We have ported our WordAloud assistive reader from Windows to LINUX. It
          reads text or web pages, with a word-at-a-time display and speech
          synthesiser. We haven't ported the speech yet, so you'd need to run
          WordAloud in text-only mode. With WordAloud you can control size of
          characters, font, colour of text and background, and the speed of
          presentation (up to 1000 words per minute). You can also step through
          the text a word or a sentence at a time.

          WordAloud allows the normally-sighted person to read very rapidly,
          because they don't have to move eyes, as the words are flashed up in the
          centre of the screen. Indeed I find I can read about three times faster
          than off the printed page. But if you have low vision, you may be able
          to read just as fast, providing you have some part of your field of view
          where you can take in the full width of the words, and read them at a
          glance. You need to fix your gaze at some spot on the screen such that
          the words flash up in the best part of your field of view. This may
          take a little experimentation, but, if you are successful, you should
          find that you can read very rapidly. In fact, your speed is likely to
          be limited by what you can take in cognitively, rather than the quality
          of your vision.

          You can download free evaluation version from www.wordaloud.co.uk, to
          run on Windows (W95, W98, ME, NT, XP and W2000).

          Cheers from Chiswick,

          John
          --
          In message <OFCC756F2D.97E1075C-ON80256B7A.00413E8B@...
          m>, Stuart M Powell <stuart.powell@...> writes
          >
          >Does anyone have any experience of screen magnification running under UNIX
          >?
          >
          >Any comments / advice will be very much appreciated.
          >
          >Thanks.
          >
          >Regards
          >
          >Stuart Powell.
          > IBM Global Services (AMS&P),
          > F3L, PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, UK, P06 3AU.
          > Tel +44(0)2392-561507. Int 251507. Mob 0775-288-9577
          > Fax +44(0)2392-560961.
          > stuart.powell@.... GBIB1AJD.

          Try our WordAloud software! Visit http://www.wordaloud.co.uk

          John Nissen, Cloudworld Ltd
          Tel: +44 20 8987 8326 (or 0845 458 3944 in the UK)
          Fax: +44 20 8742 8715
          Email: jn@...
          Site: http://www.cloudworld.co.uk
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