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Re: Duda: "Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia"

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  • fackina
    I think in the first sentence Emilia sees herself better. Aqui se ve mejor Emilia. The verb verse refers to Emilia doing the seeing. without the personal a,
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 7, 2013
      I think in the first sentence Emilia sees herself better. Aqui se ve mejor Emilia. The verb verse refers to Emilia doing the seeing. without the personal a, emilia is the subject of the sentence.

      in the 2nd sentence Aqui se ve mejor a Emilia.. refers to how others see her, like if you stand here, you can see her better --- the se ve there has an unknown subject like "el" or "one" and because of the personal a, emilia is an object rather than a subject.

      --- In maestrosdeespanol@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Hanson" <danhan22@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings, everyone!
      >
      >
      >
      > On a social network the other day, I noticed a sentence structure ("Aquí se
      > ve major a Emilia") that got me wondering. The lady had posted a picture of
      > two granddaughters and wants to point out that people can see Emilia better
      > in the photo she posted online. What's the difference between?
      >
      > 1.) Aquí se ve mejor Emilia.
      >
      > and
      >
      > 2.) Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia.
      >
      > Is there a better way to word this when talking about people can get a
      > better view of Emilia in that picture as opposed to another picture or
      > setting?
      >
      > I'm assuming the first sentence talks about how Emilia looks in that
      > particular picture while in the second statement, the speaker is making a
      > general statement (impersonal "se" with a direct object), saying that people
      > (in general) can get a better look at Emilia in that particular. Am I
      > understanding this correctly?
      >
      > Is sentence #2 something that people would say in any part of the
      > Spanish-speaking world or is it a structure (with this passive/impersonal
      > meaning) something more common in South American, or more specifically, in
      > the Cono Sur or the Río de la Plata region?
      >
      > I look forward to learning from your insights and experiences.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Warm regards,
      >
      > Daniel Hanson
      >
      > Public High School Spanish Teacher
      >
      > Atwater, California, USA
      >
    • amelia dupont
      Hola Daniel, Para mi la diferencia está en la a Aquí se ve mejor Emilia sin la a me podría decir que ella estaba enferma o algo asi y ella se ve mejor,
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 7, 2013
        Hola Daniel,
        Para mi la diferencia está en la "a"
        Aquí se ve mejor Emilia sin la "a" me podría decir que ella estaba enferma o algo asi y ella se ve mejor,
        pero con la "a" (to) me dice que en esta foto se puede ver a ella mejor que en la otra foto.
        Ojalá que me entiendas..
        Chao
        Emilia



        From: Daniel Hanson <danhan22@...>
        To: maestrosdeespanol@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, April 7, 2013 1:26 AM
        Subject: [MaestrosdeEspanol] Duda: "Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia"

         
        Greetings, everyone!
         
        On a social network the other day, I noticed a sentence structure (“Aquí se ve major a Emilia”) that got me wondering. The lady had posted a picture of two granddaughters and wants to point out that people can see Emilia better in the photo she posted online. What's the difference between?

        1.) Aquí se ve mejor Emilia.

        and

        2.) Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia.

        Is there a better way to word this when talking about people can get a better view of Emilia in that picture as opposed to another picture or setting?

        I'm assuming the first sentence talks about how Emilia looks in that particular picture while in the second statement, the speaker is making a general statement (impersonal "se" with a direct object), saying that people (in general) can get a better look at Emilia in that particular. Am I understanding this correctly?

        Is sentence #2 something that people would say in any part of the Spanish-speaking world or is it a structure (with this passive/impersonal meaning) something more common in South American, or more specifically, in the Cono Sur or the Río de la Plata region?

        I look forward to learning from your insights and experiences.
         
         
        Warm regards,
        Daniel Hanson
        Public High School Spanish Teacher
        Atwater, California, USA


      • Elisa Antonuccio
        For me, the first sentence implies that Emilia looks better in that picture (smiling, prettier, etc.), compare with another that was sent. The second sentence
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 7, 2013
          For me, the first sentence implies that Emilia looks better in that picture (smiling, prettier, etc.), compare with another that was sent. The second sentence means that Emilia is more noticeable, maybe someone was blocking her face in past pictures.

          Therefore, you assumption was right.




          From: Daniel Hanson <danhan22@...>
          To: maestrosdeespanol@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, April 7, 2013 1:26 AM
          Subject: [MaestrosdeEspanol] Duda: "Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia"

           
          Greetings, everyone!
           
          On a social network the other day, I noticed a sentence structure (“Aquí se ve major a Emilia”) that got me wondering. The lady had posted a picture of two granddaughters and wants to point out that people can see Emilia better in the photo she posted online. What's the difference between?

          1.) Aquí se ve mejor Emilia.

          and

          2.) Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia.

          Is there a better way to word this when talking about people can get a better view of Emilia in that picture as opposed to another picture or setting?

          I'm assuming the first sentence talks about how Emilia looks in that particular picture while in the second statement, the speaker is making a general statement (impersonal "se" with a direct object), saying that people (in general) can get a better look at Emilia in that particular. Am I understanding this correctly?

          Is sentence #2 something that people would say in any part of the Spanish-speaking world or is it a structure (with this passive/impersonal meaning) something more common in South American, or more specifically, in the Cono Sur or the Río de la Plata region?

          I look forward to learning from your insights and experiences.
           
           
          Warm regards,
          Daniel Hanson
          Public High School Spanish Teacher
          Atwater, California, USA


        • Pepi Rosado
          Abajo pongo comentarios a tus preguntas. ... Abajo pongo comentarios a tus preguntas. On Sun, Apr 7, 2013 at 12:26 AM, Daniel Hanson
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 13, 2013
            Abajo pongo comentarios a tus preguntas.

            On Sun, Apr 7, 2013 at 12:26 AM, Daniel Hanson <danhan22@...> wrote:
             

            Greetings, everyone!

             

            On a social network the other day, I noticed a sentence structure (“Aquí se ve major a Emilia”) that got me wondering. The lady had posted a picture of two granddaughters and wants to point out that people can see Emilia better in the photo she posted online. What's the difference between?

            1.) Aquí se ve mejor Emilia. (su aspecto, apariencia es mejor/se ve mejor en esta foto, está más guapa)

            and

            2.) Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia. (su cara, los rasgos, la nitidez, en contraposición con otra foto en la que no se ve a Emilia muy bien)

            Is there a better way to word this when talking about people can get a better view of Emilia in that picture as opposed to another picture or setting? No, yo no lo expresaría de diferente manera, así está bien.

            I'm assuming the first sentence talks about how Emilia looks in that particular picture while in the second statement, the speaker is making a general statement (impersonal "se" with a direct object), saying that people (in general) can get a better look at Emilia in that particular. Am I understanding this correctly? Así lo entiendo yo también.

            Is sentence #2 something that people would say in any part of the Spanish-speaking world or is it a structure (with this passive/impersonal meaning) something more common in South American, or more specifically, in the Cono Sur or the Río de la Plata region? Yo soy del sur de España y así es como yo lo expresaría.

            I look forward to learning from your insights and experiences.

             

             

            Warm regards,

            Daniel Hanson

            Public High School Spanish Teacher

            Atwater, California, USA


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