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Re: Making Flywheels

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  • Paul W. Chamberlain
    Which brings up a question... How are people centering over a pin with a small mill(Sherline, Taig)? I have a Blake Co-Ax Indicator I use with my larger manual
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 1, 2007
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      Which brings up a question...

      How are people centering over a pin with a small mill(Sherline, Taig)?

      I have a Blake Co-Ax Indicator I use with my larger manual mills, but
      it is too long for my Taig with the Spindle to table distance I have
      mounted.

      Guy Lautard has plans for various sized Co-Ax indicators in his
      Bedside Reader #3, but I haven't tackled one yet.

      Paul, Central OR

      *****

      --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, Rich Crook <richcrook9418@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > At 06:23 AM 5/30/2007, you wrote:
      > >Use round stock,turn and face blanks in the lathe and trepan in to
      the
      > >depth of the spokes. This leaves just cutting the spokes out and
      > >drill/ream the shaft bore. Make a fixture for the mill to hold the
      > >blanks. Drill and ream the shaft bore. Cut the spokes out in one
      pass
      > >with a 3/8" end mill leaving about .005 and then do a finish pass.
      > >
      > >You could also make an index hole with a removable pin in the
      fixture
      > >to locate the spokes and program another pass with a corner
      rounding
      > >end mill to round off all the spokes, hub and the periphery of the
      > >flywheel.
      >
      > My $.02 worth on making flywheels (or wheels in general, for that
      > matter) - You'd want to drill & ream (or bore) the center hole in
      the
      > same clamping as turning the outside to get the best possible
      > concentricity between the rim & the center hole.
      > Trepanning the web for the spokes requires a special cutting tool,
      > and is probably easier for most hobbyists to do on a mill with a
      rotary table.
      > I'd make a locating fixture for the rotary table with a pin that
      > *just* fits the finished center hole - again, to get the best
      > possible concentricity.
      > Remember, balance is very important for flywheels.
      >
      > = Rich =
      >
    • jerrybiehler
      Use a DTI (dial test indicator) like an Interapid. Mount it in the spindle with something like an indicol holder or just put it in the drill chuck. Indicate
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Use a DTI (dial test indicator) like an Interapid. Mount it in the
        spindle with something like an indicol holder or just put it in the
        drill chuck. Indicate around the pin.

        Blakes are good for maybe a thousandth or two but if you want accuracy
        a DTI is the way to go.

        I have a Blake as well (Real, not copy) and they are nice for things
        where accuracy is not critical.

        -Jerry



        --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul W. Chamberlain" <pwc@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Which brings up a question...
        >
        > How are people centering over a pin with a small mill(Sherline, Taig)?
        >
        > I have a Blake Co-Ax Indicator I use with my larger manual mills, but
        > it is too long for my Taig with the Spindle to table distance I have
        > mounted.
        >
        > Guy Lautard has plans for various sized Co-Ax indicators in his
        > Bedside Reader #3, but I haven't tackled one yet.
        >
        > Paul, Central OR
        >
        > *****
        >
        > --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, Rich Crook <richcrook9418@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > At 06:23 AM 5/30/2007, you wrote:
        > > >Use round stock,turn and face blanks in the lathe and trepan in to
        > the
        > > >depth of the spokes. This leaves just cutting the spokes out and
        > > >drill/ream the shaft bore. Make a fixture for the mill to hold the
        > > >blanks. Drill and ream the shaft bore. Cut the spokes out in one
        > pass
        > > >with a 3/8" end mill leaving about .005 and then do a finish pass.
        > > >
        > > >You could also make an index hole with a removable pin in the
        > fixture
        > > >to locate the spokes and program another pass with a corner
        > rounding
        > > >end mill to round off all the spokes, hub and the periphery of the
        > > >flywheel.
        > >
        > > My $.02 worth on making flywheels (or wheels in general, for that
        > > matter) - You'd want to drill & ream (or bore) the center hole in
        > the
        > > same clamping as turning the outside to get the best possible
        > > concentricity between the rim & the center hole.
        > > Trepanning the web for the spokes requires a special cutting tool,
        > > and is probably easier for most hobbyists to do on a mill with a
        > rotary table.
        > > I'd make a locating fixture for the rotary table with a pin that
        > > *just* fits the finished center hole - again, to get the best
        > > possible concentricity.
        > > Remember, balance is very important for flywheels.
        > >
        > > = Rich =
        > >
        >
      • Paul W. Chamberlain
        Hi Jerry, I have a few Last Words, a Gem and Best Test... none with an angled or dual face for easy viewing from all angles. I was thinking about getting one
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 2, 2007
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          Hi Jerry,

          I have a few Last Words, a Gem and Best Test... none with an angled
          or dual face for easy viewing from all angles. I was thinking about
          getting one with the dial on top for this purpose. Using a mirror is
          a step away from brain simple. ;o)

          My Blake (Real) was good-n-uff at the last shop I worked for, setting
          up the FADALs for making Dental Chair and Lighting parts... nothing
          that had to spin like a flywheel.

          I do final truing on my flywheels using Lathe Mandrels with skimming
          cuts until all deflections are removed. Most so far have been very
          small diameter, so weight balance hasn't been an issue. One of these
          days I'll have to get around to making a knife edge fixture for
          balancing... similar to the ones watchmakers use, with a healthy
          injection of steroids.

          Thanks for the response... I was looking for another gadget fix, but
          as you pointed out... the KISS principle usually rules.

          Paul, Central OR

          *****

          --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, "jerrybiehler" <macona@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Use a DTI (dial test indicator) like an Interapid. Mount it in the
          > spindle with something like an indicol holder or just put it in the
          > drill chuck. Indicate around the pin.
          >
          > Blakes are good for maybe a thousandth or two but if you want
          accuracy
          > a DTI is the way to go.
          >
          > I have a Blake as well (Real, not copy) and they are nice for things
          > where accuracy is not critical.
          >
          > -Jerry
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul W. Chamberlain" <pwc@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Which brings up a question...
          > >
          > > How are people centering over a pin with a small mill(Sherline,
          Taig)?
          > >
          > > I have a Blake Co-Ax Indicator I use with my larger manual mills,
          but
          > > it is too long for my Taig with the Spindle to table distance I
          have
          > > mounted.
          > >
          > > Guy Lautard has plans for various sized Co-Ax indicators in his
          > > Bedside Reader #3, but I haven't tackled one yet.
          > >
          > > Paul, Central OR
          > >
          > > *****
          > >
          > > --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, Rich Crook <richcrook9418@>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > At 06:23 AM 5/30/2007, you wrote:
          > > > >Use round stock,turn and face blanks in the lathe and trepan
          in to
          > > the
          > > > >depth of the spokes. This leaves just cutting the spokes out
          and
          > > > >drill/ream the shaft bore. Make a fixture for the mill to hold
          the
          > > > >blanks. Drill and ream the shaft bore. Cut the spokes out in
          one
          > > pass
          > > > >with a 3/8" end mill leaving about .005 and then do a finish
          pass.
          > > > >
          > > > >You could also make an index hole with a removable pin in the
          > > fixture
          > > > >to locate the spokes and program another pass with a corner
          > > rounding
          > > > >end mill to round off all the spokes, hub and the periphery of
          the
          > > > >flywheel.
          > > >
          > > > My $.02 worth on making flywheels (or wheels in general, for
          that
          > > > matter) - You'd want to drill & ream (or bore) the center hole
          in
          > > the
          > > > same clamping as turning the outside to get the best possible
          > > > concentricity between the rim & the center hole.
          > > > Trepanning the web for the spokes requires a special cutting
          tool,
          > > > and is probably easier for most hobbyists to do on a mill with
          a
          > > rotary table.
          > > > I'd make a locating fixture for the rotary table with a pin
          that
          > > > *just* fits the finished center hole - again, to get the best
          > > > possible concentricity.
          > > > Remember, balance is very important for flywheels.
          > > >
          > > > = Rich =
          > > >
          > >
          >
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