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Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Re: OT wireless to shop/control puter

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  • Steve Blackmore
    ... Could you not change the channel number (frequency)? I had a problem with a neighbours phone, so changed network to channel 11. Fixed. Steve Blackmore --
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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      On Thu, 01 Jun 2006 00:37:52 -0400, you wrote:

      >I've been around the block a couple of time with wireless networks.
      >802.11B has a problem with 2.4 mhz phones, kids walky talkies, etc

      Could you not change the channel number (frequency)? I had a problem
      with a neighbours phone, so changed network to channel 11. Fixed.

      Steve Blackmore
      --
    • Larry Olson
      I seem to remember a customer that had problem with his LAN every time he ran the spindle on his mill. His network was wired however and enclosed in EMT
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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        I seem to remember a customer that had problem with his LAN every time
        he ran the spindle on his mill. His network was wired however and
        enclosed in EMT (conduit). It turned out to be a grounding issue as part
        of the building was fed from one service / transformer and part from
        another. We fixed it by installing fiber but wireless probably would
        have worked as well.



        Cheers,

        Larry Olson



        _____

        From: Steve Blackmore [mailto:steve@...]
        Sent: Thursday, June 01, 2006 12:23 AM
        To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Re: OT wireless to shop/control puter



        On Thu, 01 Jun 2006 00:37:52 -0400, you wrote:

        >I've been around the block a couple of time with wireless networks.
        >802.11B has a problem with 2.4 mhz phones, kids walky talkies, etc

        Could you not change the channel number (frequency)? I had a problem
        with a neighbours phone, so changed network to channel 11. Fixed.

        Steve Blackmore
        --


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      • Jeff Goldberg
        Another way to go is 802.11a. This runs at about 5ghz, has the bandwidth of 802.11g and wouldn t be interfered with by 2.2ghz phones. If you study the
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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          Another way to go is 802.11a. This runs at about 5ghz, has the bandwidth of
          802.11g and wouldn't be interfered with by 2.2ghz phones. If you study the
          specifications, a number of access points and NIC's support this as well.
          You can sometimes even bridge with one frequency to another point while
          using the other as an access point frequency. To get the maximum
          performance out of this technique, the device should contain two discrete
          "radios" (rather than share the time slices on one), so the choice must be
          made with care in the context of the wireless design (and your budget). The
          5ghz antennas are different than 2.2ghz, but devices which do both will
          "should be" fitted with the appropriate antennas. Be aware when buying
          access points that the term "diversity" when applied to an antenna means it
          both sends and receives, else the antenna is a receive only unit to enhance
          reception. This means that it is important to know which antenna gets
          replaced (the diversity one) with a higher sensitivity one when adding to an
          access point.

          Jeff




          I've been around the block a couple of time with wireless networks.
          802.11B has a problem with 2.4 mhz phones, kids walky talkies, etc I
          had a link between myself and my neighbor for about a year and a half
          which was about 500 feet. I used a pringle can type antenna, repeaters,
          and all kinds of gear trying to make the link bullet proof. No go. She
          traded up on her cordless phone, got rid of the old 900 mhz unit and
          went with a new spiffy 2.4 mhz unit. When the phone rang, the network
          locked up. I eventually gave up on that link. In hindsight I would
          have trenched in a cable - direct burial 100 mhz twisted pair network
          cable is pretty cheap now. It's tough to beat hard wiring for basic
          reliability.

          If you have $400 bucks to spend on two really nice highly directional
          antennas it might be reliable. Other than that, forget it.

          I have a wireless network setup in my house that jumps between 3 rooms
          and it works fine. But that is about 45 feet.

          If you are trying to do a point to point link with 802.11B or G, check
          out the Ad hoc configuration. It is designed to be a peer to peer
          setup. Not a client - server model.

          Dave

          Jeffrey Goldberg wrote:

          >Mac,
          >
          >The speed of your internet connection has nothing to do with the speed of
          >your network (wired or wireless). In general, for a home, a wireless
          access
          >point and a wireless network card for each PC you want to connect wireless
          >is all you'd need. Wireless will extend through a number of rooms in a
          wood
          >frame house (you'll have to experiment). Usual distance in open air, line
          >of sight is a couple of hundred feed or more (speed drops as distance
          >increases).
          >
          >Wired does work faster and you can mix/match under most situations. Try to
          >get a 802.11g setup (faster than 802.11b, but backward compatible).
          "Pre-n"
          >802.11g could be faster/longer range.
          >
          >Jeff
          >
          >
          >Been trying like "h -- e -- double hockey sticks" to get a wireless to work
          >here, no high speed connection though. Does any body know, can you make a
          >wireless network without a high speed connection?
          >
          > Both computers legal XP mickysoft. What do you need for hardware?
          >
          >
          > Mac
          >
          >
        • guzakaka
          Hi Jeff, Is this discription where the guys take the dish type antenna to use as the high gain you mentioned? Mike ... points, a ... wired ... a pre-N ... as
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 2, 2006
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            Hi Jeff,

            Is this discription where the guys take the dish type antenna to use
            as the high gain you mentioned?

            Mike

            --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Goldberg" <jeff@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > For those trying to maximize bandwidth over distance between two
            points, a
            > pair of wireless bridges with high gain antennas hooked to a hard
            wired
            > network on each side would do.
            >
            > Another alternative which you might want to try is to link to
            a "pre-N"
            > access point with wireless NIC's from the same manufacturer (Belkin
            as an
            > example). They "should" provide extra distance and higher
            bandwidth. Until
            > IEEE 802.11n is approved, don't expect a mix/match approach between
            > manufacturers to work.
            >
            > Jeff
            >
            >
            >
            > Carl not off topic at all. In fact I need to do the same thing but
            I
            > need to cover about 600-700 ft. I have looked at the little diy
            dish
            > antenna set-ups, but I'm not sure I'm electronically up to that.
            >
            > Mike
            >
            > --- In mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com, "carlcnc" <carlcnc@> wrote:
            > >
            > > HI
            > > sorry if this is too far off topic,
            > > my shop is 75 ft from where I do my Cad/Cam and the sneakers are
            > > wearing out!
            > > what are the pitfalls of doing a wireless when in my shop I have
            > > flourescent lights, phase converters and VFD plus the usual
            > > compressors etc ??
            > > will standard "web surfer" set-ups be OK ?
            > >
            > > thanks
            > > Carl
            > >
            >
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