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RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos

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  • Dave Halliday
    Hi Chuck Thanks for the heads up! 400 in/oz -- OMG! -- it ___has___ been a while since I played with them. Dave
    Message 1 of 17 , Apr 1, 2013
      Hi Chuck

      Thanks for the heads up!

      400 in/oz -- OMG! -- it ___has___ been a while since I played with them.

      Dave

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of chuck
      > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 18:34
      > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
      >
      > Dave,
      > just an fyi I have "hobby servos" in my turbine powered
      > planes putting out 400+ in/oz I doubt any printer steppers
      > could get anywhere near that... :) LOL..
      > the hobby servos do use pulse width to determine position ...
      > ranges from 1 ms to 2 ms, with 1.5 ms being the
      > neutral(center) position I believe most use a 50hz pulse stream.
      > there are lots of how-to's on the web. might be a good place
      > for Don to start.
      > Chuck
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Dave Halliday
      > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 8:26 PM
      > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
      >
      >
      >
      > If I recall correctly, the airplane servos use a regular
      > pulse-train as
      > their input. The duty-cycle or width of the pulse
      > determines the position
      > of the servo.
      >
      > MACH3 (as well as most of the stepper motor controllers)
      > uses a parallel
      > port with one pin for step and one pin to represent
      > direction (CW/CCW)
      >
      > Using a parallel port allows the status of all of the axes
      > to be presented
      > at the same time - ker-chunk. If there was a variability in
      > time from the
      > X-axis data to the y-axis data, trying to mill a diagonal
      > line would result
      > in waving -- not a straight line.
      >
      > You could use an arduino to scale and translate. You could
      > also use some
      > more stepper motors -- dead printers have a lot of stepper
      > motors in them
      > and they should have about the same torque as a hobby servo.
      >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
      > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Don
      > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 12:42
      > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
      > >
      > > Is anyone using model airplane servos with mach 3 out put. I
      > > want to drive two stepper motors and two servos. Is that
      > > being done? And how? What I have in mind is a lathe with the
      > > spindle X axes a stepper and Y axes that run the tool back
      > > and forth a stepper motor and Z a model servo and a tool
      > > changer using another model servo.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Andy Wander
      What is an inch per ounce? Andy Wander _____ From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave Halliday Sent:
      Message 2 of 17 , Apr 1, 2013
        What is an inch per ounce?



        Andy Wander

        _____

        From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Dave Halliday
        Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 11:28 PM
        To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos





        Hi Chuck

        Thanks for the heads up!

        400 in/oz -- OMG! -- it ___has___ been a while since I played with them.

        Dave

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
        > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of chuck
        > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 18:34
        > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>

        > Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
        >
        > Dave,
        > just an fyi I have "hobby servos" in my turbine powered
        > planes putting out 400+ in/oz I doubt any printer steppers
        > could get anywhere near that... :) LOL..
        > the hobby servos do use pulse width to determine position ...
        > ranges from 1 ms to 2 ms, with 1.5 ms being the
        > neutral(center) position I believe most use a 50hz pulse stream.
        > there are lots of how-to's on the web. might be a good place
        > for Don to start.
        > Chuck
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Dave Halliday
        > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>

        > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 8:26 PM
        > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
        >
        >
        >
        > If I recall correctly, the airplane servos use a regular
        > pulse-train as
        > their input. The duty-cycle or width of the pulse
        > determines the position
        > of the servo.
        >
        > MACH3 (as well as most of the stepper motor controllers)
        > uses a parallel
        > port with one pin for step and one pin to represent
        > direction (CW/CCW)
        >
        > Using a parallel port allows the status of all of the axes
        > to be presented
        > at the same time - ker-chunk. If there was a variability in
        > time from the
        > X-axis data to the y-axis data, trying to mill a diagonal
        > line would result
        > in waving -- not a straight line.
        >
        > You could use an arduino to scale and translate. You could
        > also use some
        > more stepper motors -- dead printers have a lot of stepper
        > motors in them
        > and they should have about the same torque as a hobby servo.
        >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Don
        > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 12:42
        > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
        > >
        > > Is anyone using model airplane servos with mach 3 out put. I
        > > want to drive two stepper motors and two servos. Is that
        > > being done? And how? What I have in mind is a lathe with the
        > > spindle X axes a stepper and Y axes that run the tool back
        > > and forth a stepper motor and Z a model servo and a tool
        > > changer using another model servo.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dave Halliday
        Attach a one inch long lever to the shaft. Attach a 400 Ounce (25 Pound!) weight to the end of that lever. The servo will lift it.
        Message 3 of 17 , Apr 1, 2013
          Attach a one inch long lever to the shaft.

          Attach a 400 Ounce (25 Pound!) weight to the end of that lever. The servo
          will lift it.

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andy Wander
          > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 20:39
          > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
          >
          > What is an inch per ounce?
          >
          >
          >
          > Andy Wander
          >
          > _____
          >
          > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
          > On Behalf Of Dave Halliday
          > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 11:28 PM
          > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi Chuck
          >
          > Thanks for the heads up!
          >
          > 400 in/oz -- OMG! -- it ___has___ been a while since I played
          > with them.
          >
          > Dave
          >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of chuck
          > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 18:34
          > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
          >
          > > Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
          > >
          > > Dave,
          > > just an fyi I have "hobby servos" in my turbine powered
          > > planes putting out 400+ in/oz I doubt any printer steppers
          > > could get anywhere near that... :) LOL..
          > > the hobby servos do use pulse width to determine position ...
          > > ranges from 1 ms to 2 ms, with 1.5 ms being the
          > > neutral(center) position I believe most use a 50hz pulse stream.
          > > there are lots of how-to's on the web. might be a good place
          > > for Don to start.
          > > Chuck
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: Dave Halliday
          > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
          >
          > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 8:26 PM
          > > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > If I recall correctly, the airplane servos use a regular
          > > pulse-train as
          > > their input. The duty-cycle or width of the pulse
          > > determines the position
          > > of the servo.
          > >
          > > MACH3 (as well as most of the stepper motor controllers)
          > > uses a parallel
          > > port with one pin for step and one pin to represent
          > > direction (CW/CCW)
          > >
          > > Using a parallel port allows the status of all of the axes
          > > to be presented
          > > at the same time - ker-chunk. If there was a variability in
          > > time from the
          > > X-axis data to the y-axis data, trying to mill a diagonal
          > > line would result
          > > in waving -- not a straight line.
          > >
          > > You could use an arduino to scale and translate. You could
          > > also use some
          > > more stepper motors -- dead printers have a lot of stepper
          > > motors in them
          > > and they should have about the same torque as a hobby servo.
          > >
          > > > -----Original Message-----
          > > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Don
          > > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 12:42
          > > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
          > > >
          > > > Is anyone using model airplane servos with mach 3 out put. I
          > > > want to drive two stepper motors and two servos. Is that
          > > > being done? And how? What I have in mind is a lathe with the
          > > > spindle X axes a stepper and Y axes that run the tool back
          > > > and forth a stepper motor and Z a model servo and a tool
          > > > changer using another model servo.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > ________________________________
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > ------------------------------------
          > > >
          > > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Andy Wander
          Sounds like you mean torque, which is measured in in-oz or oz-in,, not inches per ounce. Andy Wander _____ From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 17 , Apr 1, 2013
            Sounds like you mean torque, which is measured in in-oz or oz-in,, not
            inches per ounce.



            Andy Wander

            _____

            From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of Dave Halliday
            Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 12:03 AM
            To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos





            Attach a one inch long lever to the shaft.

            Attach a 400 Ounce (25 Pound!) weight to the end of that lever. The servo
            will lift it.

            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Andy Wander
            > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 20:39
            > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>

            > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
            >
            > What is an inch per ounce?
            >
            >
            >
            > Andy Wander
            >
            > _____
            >
            > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ]
            > On Behalf Of Dave Halliday
            > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 11:28 PM
            > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>

            > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi Chuck
            >
            > Thanks for the heads up!
            >
            > 400 in/oz -- OMG! -- it ___has___ been a while since I played
            > with them.
            >
            > Dave
            >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of chuck
            > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 18:34
            > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            >
            > > Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
            > >
            > > Dave,
            > > just an fyi I have "hobby servos" in my turbine powered
            > > planes putting out 400+ in/oz I doubt any printer steppers
            > > could get anywhere near that... :) LOL..
            > > the hobby servos do use pulse width to determine position ...
            > > ranges from 1 ms to 2 ms, with 1.5 ms being the
            > > neutral(center) position I believe most use a 50hz pulse stream.
            > > there are lots of how-to's on the web. might be a good place
            > > for Don to start.
            > > Chuck
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: Dave Halliday
            > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            >
            > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 8:26 PM
            > > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > If I recall correctly, the airplane servos use a regular
            > > pulse-train as
            > > their input. The duty-cycle or width of the pulse
            > > determines the position
            > > of the servo.
            > >
            > > MACH3 (as well as most of the stepper motor controllers)
            > > uses a parallel
            > > port with one pin for step and one pin to represent
            > > direction (CW/CCW)
            > >
            > > Using a parallel port allows the status of all of the axes
            > > to be presented
            > > at the same time - ker-chunk. If there was a variability in
            > > time from the
            > > X-axis data to the y-axis data, trying to mill a diagonal
            > > line would result
            > > in waving -- not a straight line.
            > >
            > > You could use an arduino to scale and translate. You could
            > > also use some
            > > more stepper motors -- dead printers have a lot of stepper
            > > motors in them
            > > and they should have about the same torque as a hobby servo.
            > >
            > > > -----Original Message-----
            > > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Don
            > > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 12:42
            > > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
            > > >
            > > > Is anyone using model airplane servos with mach 3 out put. I
            > > > want to drive two stepper motors and two servos. Is that
            > > > being done? And how? What I have in mind is a lathe with the
            > > > spindle X axes a stepper and Y axes that run the tool back
            > > > and forth a stepper motor and Z a model servo and a tool
            > > > changer using another model servo.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ________________________________
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ------------------------------------
            > > >
            > > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • chuck
            Andy, you are correct sir! please forgive the typo.... :{ Chuck ... From: Andy Wander To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 12:19 AM
            Message 5 of 17 , Apr 2, 2013
              Andy,
              you are correct sir! please forgive the typo.... :{
              Chuck

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Andy Wander
              To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 12:19 AM
              Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos



              Sounds like you mean torque, which is measured in in-oz or oz-in,, not
              inches per ounce.

              Andy Wander

              _____

              From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of Dave Halliday
              Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 12:03 AM
              To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos

              Attach a one inch long lever to the shaft.

              Attach a 400 Ounce (25 Pound!) weight to the end of that lever. The servo
              will lift it.

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Andy Wander
              > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 20:39
              > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>

              > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
              >
              > What is an inch per ounce?
              >
              >
              >
              > Andy Wander
              >
              > _____
              >
              > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ]
              > On Behalf Of Dave Halliday
              > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 11:28 PM
              > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>

              > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Hi Chuck
              >
              > Thanks for the heads up!
              >
              > 400 in/oz -- OMG! -- it ___has___ been a while since I played
              > with them.
              >
              > Dave
              >
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of chuck
              > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 18:34
              > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              >
              > > Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
              > >
              > > Dave,
              > > just an fyi I have "hobby servos" in my turbine powered
              > > planes putting out 400+ in/oz I doubt any printer steppers
              > > could get anywhere near that... :) LOL..
              > > the hobby servos do use pulse width to determine position ...
              > > ranges from 1 ms to 2 ms, with 1.5 ms being the
              > > neutral(center) position I believe most use a 50hz pulse stream.
              > > there are lots of how-to's on the web. might be a good place
              > > for Don to start.
              > > Chuck
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: Dave Halliday
              > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              >
              > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 8:26 PM
              > > Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > If I recall correctly, the airplane servos use a regular
              > > pulse-train as
              > > their input. The duty-cycle or width of the pulse
              > > determines the position
              > > of the servo.
              > >
              > > MACH3 (as well as most of the stepper motor controllers)
              > > uses a parallel
              > > port with one pin for step and one pin to represent
              > > direction (CW/CCW)
              > >
              > > Using a parallel port allows the status of all of the axes
              > > to be presented
              > > at the same time - ker-chunk. If there was a variability in
              > > time from the
              > > X-axis data to the y-axis data, trying to mill a diagonal
              > > line would result
              > > in waving -- not a straight line.
              > >
              > > You could use an arduino to scale and translate. You could
              > > also use some
              > > more stepper motors -- dead printers have a lot of stepper
              > > motors in them
              > > and they should have about the same torque as a hobby servo.
              > >
              > > > -----Original Message-----
              > > > From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Don
              > > > Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 12:42
              > > > To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] Model air plane servos
              > > >
              > > > Is anyone using model airplane servos with mach 3 out put. I
              > > > want to drive two stepper motors and two servos. Is that
              > > > being done? And how? What I have in mind is a lathe with the
              > > > spindle X axes a stepper and Y axes that run the tool back
              > > > and forth a stepper motor and Z a model servo and a tool
              > > > changer using another model servo.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ________________________________
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------------
              > > >
              > > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > www.machsupport.com - Web site AccessYahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >

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