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3D printer

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  • Donald Clifton
    Art, Just wondering how are things going with the 3D printer build? Thanks Don Clifton
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
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      Art, Just wondering how are things going with the 3D printer build?
      Thanks
      Don Clifton
    • art2
      Don: We ve mounted the robot arm on a sturdy base.. and we re starting to design the piston like table thats going to have the object printed on it. All this
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
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        Don:

        We've mounted the robot arm on a sturdy base.. and we're starting to design the piston like table thats going to
        have the object printed on it. All this will likley take a few months till we get to start doign any printing tests. Its going to
        be an interesting project..


        Thanks,
        Art
        www.gearotic.com




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Donald Clifton
        To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 10:33 AM
        Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer



        Art, Just wondering how are things going with the 3D printer build?
        Thanks
        Don Clifton





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bill McBride
        Art, you need to be worring about 2 things. building and sending us some tasty pics PPPPPLLLLLLEEEEEEAAAAAASSSSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE! From: art2 Sent:
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
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          Art,
          you need to be worring about 2 things. building and sending us some tasty pics PPPPPLLLLLLEEEEEEAAAAAASSSSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

          From: art2
          Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 9:54 AM
          To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer


          Don:

          We've mounted the robot arm on a sturdy base.. and we're starting to design the piston like table thats going to
          have the object printed on it. All this will likley take a few months till we get to start doign any printing tests. Its going to
          be an interesting project..

          Thanks,
          Art
          www.gearotic.com

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Donald Clifton
          To: mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 10:33 AM
          Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer

          Art, Just wondering how are things going with the 3D printer build?
          Thanks
          Don Clifton

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Donald Clifton
          Can t wait. Donald Clifton ... From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill McBride Sent: Saturday, April 02,
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
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            Can't wait.
            Donald Clifton
            -----Original Message-----
            From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill McBride
            Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 10:26 AM
            To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer



            Art,
            you need to be worring about 2 things. building and sending us some tasty pics PPPPPLLLLLLEEEEEEAAAAAASSSSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

            From: art2
            Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 9:54 AM
            To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer

            Don:

            We've mounted the robot arm on a sturdy base.. and we're starting to design the piston like table thats going to
            have the object printed on it. All this will likley take a few months till we get to start doign any printing tests. Its going to
            be an interesting project..

            Thanks,
            Art
            www.gearotic.com

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Donald Clifton
            To: mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 10:33 AM
            Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer

            Art, Just wondering how are things going with the 3D printer build?
            Thanks
            Don Clifton

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • art2
            ... Photos will begin to appear as we start the build, Im actually waiting for my Laser to arrive next week before I get too far into it. The first problem we
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
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              Bill:

              :)

              Photos will begin to appear as we start the build, Im actually waiting for my Laser to arrive next week before I get too far into it. The first problem we face is the platform table. Since we want to fill it with powder ( layer by layer via inkjet) as well as use it without powder ( abs thermal extrusion head), the design of it wasnt something that was obvious to us. We wanted it to be sturdy, but easy enough to buld that anyone "could" build it. That means we dont want to weld together a complex box/platform arrangement.. It has to hold up to 12" of ceramic powder deep ( fairly heavy) and be fairly tight so side leakage isnt an issue.. It has to be cheap and easy for others to build..

              We've decided to try an experiment. We're going to build it round from double layers of sonotube. Inside the double 12" sonotube, will be a very slightly
              smaller sonotube ( also doubled) which will act as a piston that drives up and down the outter tube. On top of that piston will be a machined cover (wooden)
              that acts as the print table.. and a linear actuator inside the whole thing to drive the piston up or down 12".. giving me a round 12" by 12" deep build chamber. (Round is much simpler than square.. :-) )

              So the first attempt at a platform table will all be made from one 8' length of 12ID sonotube.. the smaller sizes made by slitting and removing a calculated strips so that when two are bonded together 180 degrees opposed and squeezed round again they meet the size criterion. The double walled sono that results both as outside and inside tubes ,when plugged with a wooden platform should be strong enough to take quite a bit of stress.. and painted up will look pretty unique I suspect.

              Dunno if this will work but it solves a few problems with weight , balance,level .. and requires no bearings on the piston, just a couple Orings on the piston top.. The inside sono will be deep enough to keep it all acting like a piston in a car.. The outside Sono will be about 3' tall and have a curved hinged door cut into its bottom foot to allow motor and linear actuator to fit inside.. and that assembly will simply stand beneath the robots arm.. A table top will be cut
              to exactly fit over the top so its a table with a round 12" hole that the platform move up to fill.. ( Dunno if I explained all that well enough to be visuallised, but Im sure some of the hackers out there will be able to picture it.. Crazy plan I know but it just solves so many issues that I cant help but try it... :-)

              (Thats the plan so far, Ill post photo's as we glue this all together and try to make it work.. )


              Thanks,
              Art
              www.gearotic.com




              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Bill McBride
              To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 11:25 AM
              Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer



              Art,
              you need to be worring about 2 things. building and sending us some tasty pics PPPPPLLLLLLEEEEEEAAAAAASSSSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

              From: art2
              Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 9:54 AM
              To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer

              Don:

              We've mounted the robot arm on a sturdy base.. and we're starting to design the piston like table thats going to
              have the object printed on it. All this will likley take a few months till we get to start doign any printing tests. Its going to
              be an interesting project..

              Thanks,
              Art
              www.gearotic.com

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Donald Clifton
              To: mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 10:33 AM
              Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer

              Art, Just wondering how are things going with the 3D printer build?
              Thanks
              Don Clifton

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Boman33
              Hi Art, I agree that the seal and piston function will be a lot of easier with the round table design. Drawback is that for rectangular objects it needs to be
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Art,

                I agree that the seal and piston function will be a lot of easier with the round table design. Drawback is that for rectangular objects it needs to be bigger than if a square box.



                You are not mentioning about the power supply box. Typically is a rectangular box next to the build platform to make it easy to scrape the power over the build table in a uniform layer.

                I think but do not know that it will be more difficult to have two round ones and move the powder in a controlled manner. Of course if you plan some other powder dispensing method that might not apply.

                Good luck and keep the info coming.

                Bertho



                From: art2 Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 11:10



                Photos will begin to appear as we start the build, Im actually waiting for my Laser to arrive next week before I get too far into it. The first problem we face is the platform table. Since we want to fill it with powder ( layer by layer via inkjet) as well as use it without powder ( abs thermal extrusion head), the design of it wasnt something that was obvious to us. We wanted it to be sturdy, but easy enough to buld that anyone "could" build it. That means we dont want to weld together a complex box/platform arrangement.. It has to hold up to 12" of ceramic powder deep ( fairly heavy) and be fairly tight so side leakage isnt an issue.. It has to be cheap and easy for others to build..

                We've decided to try an experiment. We're going to build it round from double layers of sonotube. Inside the double 12" sonotube, will be a very slightly
                smaller sonotube ( also doubled) which will act as a piston that drives up and down the outter tube. On top of that piston will be a machined cover (wooden)
                that acts as the print table.. and a linear actuator inside the whole thing to drive the piston up or down 12".. giving me a round 12" by 12" deep build chamber. (Round is much simpler than square.. :-) )

                So the first attempt at a platform table will all be made from one 8' length of 12ID sonotube.. the smaller sizes made by slitting and removing a calculated strips so that when two are bonded together 180 degrees opposed and squeezed round again they meet the size criterion. The double walled sono that results both as outside and inside tubes ,when plugged with a wooden platform should be strong enough to take quite a bit of stress.. and painted up will look pretty unique I suspect.

                Dunno if this will work but it solves a few problems with weight , balance,level .. and requires no bearings on the piston, just a couple Orings on the piston top.. The inside sono will be deep enough to keep it all acting like a piston in a car.. The outside Sono will be about 3' tall and have a curved hinged door cut into its bottom foot to allow motor and linear actuator to fit inside.. and that assembly will simply stand beneath the robots arm.. A table top will be cut
                to exactly fit over the top so its a table with a round 12" hole that the platform move up to fill.. ( Dunno if I explained all that well enough to be visuallised, but Im sure some of the hackers out there will be able to picture it.. Crazy plan I know but it just solves so many issues that I cant help but try it... :-)

                (Thats the plan so far, Ill post photo's as we glue this all together and try to make it work.. )

                Thanks,
                Art
                www.gearotic.com





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • art2
                Bertho: I rejected the dual platform approach to spread the powder as being too much mechanics invested just to provide a metered amount of powder. It just
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Bertho:

                  I rejected the dual platform approach to spread the powder as being too much mechanics invested just to provide a metered amount of powder.
                  It just seemed a bad tradeoff in terms of moving parts vs their function. Im leaning heavily toward a 12" long grooved bar around 3" in diameter
                  at the bottom of a rectangulat holder. As the bar turns the groove drops a metered amount of powder. This will be mounted on the same arm holding the injet. So it will spread the powder in advance of the sweep of the injet.. Thats one stepper motor and a holding bin vs a full piston assembly
                  to do a fairly innocuous job.. Of course by the time Im done I may have some weird multiaxis logic to do that.. but Im aiming simple. :)


                  Thanks,
                  Art
                  www.gearotic.com




                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Boman33
                  To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 12:50 PM
                  Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer



                  Hi Art,

                  I agree that the seal and piston function will be a lot of easier with the round table design. Drawback is that for rectangular objects it needs to be bigger than if a square box.

                  You are not mentioning about the power supply box. Typically is a rectangular box next to the build platform to make it easy to scrape the power over the build table in a uniform layer.

                  I think but do not know that it will be more difficult to have two round ones and move the powder in a controlled manner. Of course if you plan some other powder dispensing method that might not apply.

                  Good luck and keep the info coming.

                  Bertho

                  From: art2 Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 11:10

                  Photos will begin to appear as we start the build, Im actually waiting for my Laser to arrive next week before I get too far into it. The first problem we face is the platform table. Since we want to fill it with powder ( layer by layer via inkjet) as well as use it without powder ( abs thermal extrusion head), the design of it wasnt something that was obvious to us. We wanted it to be sturdy, but easy enough to buld that anyone "could" build it. That means we dont want to weld together a complex box/platform arrangement.. It has to hold up to 12" of ceramic powder deep ( fairly heavy) and be fairly tight so side leakage isnt an issue.. It has to be cheap and easy for others to build..

                  We've decided to try an experiment. We're going to build it round from double layers of sonotube. Inside the double 12" sonotube, will be a very slightly
                  smaller sonotube ( also doubled) which will act as a piston that drives up and down the outter tube. On top of that piston will be a machined cover (wooden)
                  that acts as the print table.. and a linear actuator inside the whole thing to drive the piston up or down 12".. giving me a round 12" by 12" deep build chamber. (Round is much simpler than square.. :-) )

                  So the first attempt at a platform table will all be made from one 8' length of 12ID sonotube.. the smaller sizes made by slitting and removing a calculated strips so that when two are bonded together 180 degrees opposed and squeezed round again they meet the size criterion. The double walled sono that results both as outside and inside tubes ,when plugged with a wooden platform should be strong enough to take quite a bit of stress.. and painted up will look pretty unique I suspect.

                  Dunno if this will work but it solves a few problems with weight , balance,level .. and requires no bearings on the piston, just a couple Orings on the piston top.. The inside sono will be deep enough to keep it all acting like a piston in a car.. The outside Sono will be about 3' tall and have a curved hinged door cut into its bottom foot to allow motor and linear actuator to fit inside.. and that assembly will simply stand beneath the robots arm.. A table top will be cut
                  to exactly fit over the top so its a table with a round 12" hole that the platform move up to fill.. ( Dunno if I explained all that well enough to be visuallised, but Im sure some of the hackers out there will be able to picture it.. Crazy plan I know but it just solves so many issues that I cant help but try it... :-)

                  (Thats the plan so far, Ill post photo's as we glue this all together and try to make it work.. )

                  Thanks,
                  Art
                  www.gearotic.com

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Boman33
                  Art: I expected you had thought about itJ On the DIY_3D forum, maybe a year or two, one guy was working on a top dispensing system that was similar. He had
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 2, 2011
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                    Art:

                    I expected you had thought about itJ

                    On the DIY_3D forum, maybe a year or two, one guy was working on a top
                    dispensing system that was similar. He had some CAD drawings but I do not
                    know what happened in the end.



                    One difficult part is to get a very uniform thickness layer of the powder.
                    You might want to dispense the powder on the return stroke (page return) and
                    have the counter-rotating roller mounted just in front of the printer so as
                    it is printing, it levels the powder at the same time. Interesting
                    subjects. I wish I had time to play with it now.

                    Bertho



                    From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
                    On Behalf Of art2
                    Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 12:51
                    To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer





                    Bertho:

                    I rejected the dual platform approach to spread the powder as being too much
                    mechanics invested just to provide a metered amount of powder.
                    It just seemed a bad tradeoff in terms of moving parts vs their function. Im
                    leaning heavily toward a 12" long grooved bar around 3" in diameter
                    at the bottom of a rectangulat holder. As the bar turns the groove drops a
                    metered amount of powder. This will be mounted on the same arm holding the
                    injet. So it will spread the powder in advance of the sweep of the injet..
                    Thats one stepper motor and a holding bin vs a full piston assembly
                    to do a fairly innocuous job.. Of course by the time Im done I may have some
                    weird multiaxis logic to do that.. but Im aiming simple. :)

                    Thanks,
                    Art
                    www.gearotic.com

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Boman33
                    To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mach1mach2cnc%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 12:50 PM
                    Subject: RE: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer

                    Hi Art,

                    I agree that the seal and piston function will be a lot of easier with the
                    round table design. Drawback is that for rectangular objects it needs to be
                    bigger than if a square box.

                    You are not mentioning about the power supply box. Typically is a
                    rectangular box next to the build platform to make it easy to scrape the
                    power over the build table in a uniform layer.

                    I think but do not know that it will be more difficult to have two round
                    ones and move the powder in a controlled manner. Of course if you plan some
                    other powder dispensing method that might not apply.

                    Good luck and keep the info coming.

                    Bertho

                    From: art2 Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2011 11:10

                    Photos will begin to appear as we start the build, Im actually waiting for
                    my Laser to arrive next week before I get too far into it. The first problem
                    we face is the platform table. Since we want to fill it with powder ( layer
                    by layer via inkjet) as well as use it without powder ( abs thermal
                    extrusion head), the design of it wasnt something that was obvious to us. We
                    wanted it to be sturdy, but easy enough to buld that anyone "could" build
                    it. That means we dont want to weld together a complex box/platform
                    arrangement.. It has to hold up to 12" of ceramic powder deep ( fairly
                    heavy) and be fairly tight so side leakage isnt an issue.. It has to be
                    cheap and easy for others to build..

                    We've decided to try an experiment. We're going to build it round from
                    double layers of sonotube. Inside the double 12" sonotube, will be a very
                    slightly
                    smaller sonotube ( also doubled) which will act as a piston that drives up
                    and down the outter tube. On top of that piston will be a machined cover
                    (wooden)
                    that acts as the print table.. and a linear actuator inside the whole thing
                    to drive the piston up or down 12".. giving me a round 12" by 12" deep build
                    chamber. (Round is much simpler than square.. :-) )

                    So the first attempt at a platform table will all be made from one 8' length
                    of 12ID sonotube.. the smaller sizes made by slitting and removing a
                    calculated strips so that when two are bonded together 180 degrees opposed
                    and squeezed round again they meet the size criterion. The double walled
                    sono that results both as outside and inside tubes ,when plugged with a
                    wooden platform should be strong enough to take quite a bit of stress.. and
                    painted up will look pretty unique I suspect.

                    Dunno if this will work but it solves a few problems with weight ,
                    balance,level .. and requires no bearings on the piston, just a couple
                    Orings on the piston top.. The inside sono will be deep enough to keep it
                    all acting like a piston in a car.. The outside Sono will be about 3' tall
                    and have a curved hinged door cut into its bottom foot to allow motor and
                    linear actuator to fit inside.. and that assembly will simply stand beneath
                    the robots arm.. A table top will be cut
                    to exactly fit over the top so its a table with a round 12" hole that the
                    platform move up to fill.. ( Dunno if I explained all that well enough to be
                    visuallised, but Im sure some of the hackers out there will be able to
                    picture it.. Crazy plan I know but it just solves so many issues that I cant
                    help but try it... :-)

                    (Thats the plan so far, Ill post photo's as we glue this all together and
                    try to make it work.. )

                    Thanks,
                    Art
                    www.gearotic.com

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • beebear
                    I have an inexpensive milling machine I d like to convert to a 3d printer. It s made of PVC and it does pretty good at cnc. What all do I need to use Mach 3 to
                    Message 9 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
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                      I have an inexpensive milling machine I’d like to convert to a 3d printer. It’s made of PVC and it does pretty good at cnc.

                       

                      What all do I need to use Mach 3 to run it besides the heater and filament feed?

                       

                      Thanks for the info

                       

                      John Frankforther




                      This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.


                    • migueldeservantesysaavedra
                      I m going to be very honest with you, I wouldn t use Mach, because of the nature of the way that Mach work 3D printing is an ADDITIVE manufacturing process,
                      Message 10 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I'm going to be very honest with you, I wouldn't use Mach, because of the nature of the way that Mach work 

                        3D printing is an "ADDITIVE" manufacturing process, and what we do with mach is a "Removing" material to liberate the part inside of a billet of material... hence I don't even know if Mach have such a feature!! 


                        Don't get me wrong. and more important, I'm a true novice at the use of Mach, I just bought my version less than 4 months ago and only fiddle with it perhaps one or two months before buying, 

                        But there are many other programs out there that where designed with the purpose of adding matterial in stead of taking, 
                        Also you may find  out that I'm just  a total ignorant and some one come here and tell you... yeah Mach does and even better than any other program out there.... 

                        So what I was trying to explain was just my humble and very personal point of view... OK?? 
                      • Gary Crowell
                        I think you could use Mach3, but just as your gcode interpreter/driver. You d use something like MatterControl (http://www.mattercontrol.com/) to generate the
                        Message 11 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
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                          I think you could use Mach3, but just as your gcode interpreter/driver.  You'd use something like MatterControl  (http://www.mattercontrol.com/) to generate the gcode.

                          Gary

                          On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 12:55 PM, armaggedonturbo@... [mach1mach2cnc] <mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                           

                          I'm going to be very honest with you, I wouldn't use Mach, because of the nature of the way that Mach work 


                          3D printing is an "ADDITIVE" manufacturing process, and what we do with mach is a "Removing" material to liberate the part inside of a billet of material... hence I don't even know if Mach have such a feature!! 


                          Don't get me wrong. and more important, I'm a true novice at the use of Mach, I just bought my version less than 4 months ago and only fiddle with it perhaps one or two months before buying, 

                          But there are many other programs out there that where designed with the purpose of adding matterial in stead of taking, 
                          Also you may find  out that I'm just  a total ignorant and some one come here and tell you... yeah Mach does and even better than any other program out there.... 

                          So what I was trying to explain was just my humble and very personal point of view... OK?? 




                          --
                          ----------------------------------------------
                          Gary A. Crowell Sr., P.E., CID+
                        • Andy Wander
                          You can use Mach3, as long as your CAM program spits out the proper code. I haven t worked on this for a while, but I know Slic3r has a Mach post-processor.
                          Message 12 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
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                            You can use Mach3, as long as your CAM program spits out the proper code. I haven't worked on this for a while, but I know Slic3r has a Mach post-processor.

                             

                            You will have to decide whether your extruder will act as a "spindle" on /off/speed) or as a 4th axis.

                             

                            Andy Wander


                            From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
                            Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 2:55 PM
                            To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] Re: 3D printer

                             

                             

                            I'm going to be very honest with you, I wouldn't use Mach, because of the nature of the way that Mach work 

                             

                            3D printing is an "ADDITIVE" manufacturing process, and what we do with mach is a "Removing" material to liberate the part inside of a billet of material... hence I don't even know if Mach have such a feature!! 



                            Don't get me wrong. and more important, I'm a true novice at the use of Mach, I just bought my version less than 4 months ago and only fiddle with it perhaps one or two months before buying, 

                            But there are many other programs out there that where designed with the purpose of adding matterial in stead of taking, 
                            Also you may find  out that I'm just  a total ignorant and some one come here and tell you... yeah Mach does and even better than any other program out there.... 

                            So what I was trying to explain was just my humble and very personal point of view... OK?? 

                          • Gary Crowell
                            Simplify3d (http://www.simplify3d.com/) is also another slicer/controller/gcode generator that works very well. Not free though, $140. On Tue, Sep 16, 2014
                            Message 13 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
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                              Simplify3d  (http://www.simplify3d.com/) is also another slicer/controller/gcode generator that works very well.  Not free though, $140.

                              On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 1:12 PM, Gary Crowell <garyacrowellsr@...> wrote:
                              I think you could use Mach3, but just as your gcode interpreter/driver.  You'd use something like MatterControl  (http://www.mattercontrol.com/) to generate the gcode.

                              Gary

                              On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 12:55 PM, armaggedonturbo@... [mach1mach2cnc] <mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                               

                              I'm going to be very honest with you, I wouldn't use Mach, because of the nature of the way that Mach work 


                              3D printing is an "ADDITIVE" manufacturing process, and what we do with mach is a "Removing" material to liberate the part inside of a billet of material... hence I don't even know if Mach have such a feature!! 


                              Don't get me wrong. and more important, I'm a true novice at the use of Mach, I just bought my version less than 4 months ago and only fiddle with it perhaps one or two months before buying, 

                              But there are many other programs out there that where designed with the purpose of adding matterial in stead of taking, 
                              Also you may find  out that I'm just  a total ignorant and some one come here and tell you... yeah Mach does and even better than any other program out there.... 

                              So what I was trying to explain was just my humble and very personal point of view... OK?? 




                              --
                              ----------------------------------------------
                              Gary A. Crowell Sr., P.E., CID+



                              --
                              ----------------------------------------------
                              Gary A. Crowell Sr., P.E., CID+
                            • danmauch
                              I wrote an article for The Digital Machinist Magazine and it was published in the summer 2012 issue. It explains everything on how to you your machine with
                              Message 14 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
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                                 I    wrote an article for The Digital Machinist Magazine  and it was published in the summer 2012 issue. It explains everything on how to you your machine with mach3. You can get a back copy form thm.

                                Dan Mauch

                                21th Anniversary in CNC

                                product builder odfGecko products

                              • John Dammeyer
                                I use my JGRO CNC router. It has 5 TPI ball screws so it s reasonably fast but massive enough that if I go quickly it shakes quite a bit. I m using 1.75mm
                                Message 15 of 18 , Sep 16, 2014
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                                  I use my JGRO CNC router. It has 5 TPI ball screws so it's reasonably fast
                                  but massive enough that if I go quickly it shakes quite a bit. I'm using
                                  1.75mm filament with an extruder I picked up from EBAY. No heated bed yet.
                                  EBAY temperature controller. MACH3 runs the A axis as the filament feed.
                                  Better to do that in relative mode than absolute. Use a program called
                                  Slicr3.exe. It's free. It can generate G-Code for MACH3.
                                  Now how good all this is compared to a toothed belt driven light weight 3D
                                  printer I don't know. How well the slicing is done compared to other
                                  products? I don't know. Is it better to spend money on a really good
                                  extruder? Yes. Can you do it with a cheap one? Yes. I started with the
                                  lower temperature PLA. I'll move up to ABS as soon as other projects settle
                                  down.
                                  John Dammeyer



                                  From: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com]
                                  Sent: September-16-14 11:37 AM
                                  To: mach1mach2cnc@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [mach1mach2cnc] 3D printer





                                  I have an inexpensive milling machine I'd like to convert to a 3d printer.
                                  It's made of PVC and it does pretty good at cnc.

                                  What all do I need to use Mach 3 to run it besides the heater and filament
                                  feed?

                                  Thanks for the info

                                  John Frankforther

                                  _____


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                                • Robin Stoddart-Stones
                                  Your problem is to decide what it is that you want to do. If you want to experiment with 3D printing then converting a CNC router is fairly simple, however
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Sep 17, 2014
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                                    Your problem is to decide what it is that you want to do.

                                    If you want to experiment with 3D printing then converting a CNC router is fairly simple,  however one has to ask why one would use Mach (apart from the fact that you have it).

                                    Cheap 3D printers are designed to add layers of plastic across the whole of a part, whereas subtractive engineering only worries about the rest of the part if the tool is going to collide with it. The CAM program for 3d (the "slicer") typically  prints a layer at a time with a layer thickness from a micron upwards.

                                    You need a temperature-controlled bed, you need a temperature controlled 'hot-end' and you need a controlled material feed.  Mach does none of these naturally, though you can bodge material feed as an 'axis' control.

                                    On the other hand, you can get a 3D printer controller for around $100, running on a PIC (eg: Arduino)  with free, open source  software designed for the job including the PID control of temperature and with stepper control.

                                    Equally, you might have to ask why convert your router ? It is designed to resist the forces of machining and moving a heavy spindle, while the hotend of a 3D printer has no meaningful machining forces and weighs from 30grams (to about a kilo if you have  if you have  feed control on the hotend carriage ). For a very limited price you can construct something like the Mendel90 (http://reprap.org/wiki/Mendel90) which can be scaled for a variety of sizes using  OpenScad, another free opensource program.

                                    The problem with 3D printing is that the forces involved are so low that any vibration is reflected in the part, and a router designed to ignore the very tiny forces, because they won't deflect the tool path, may well prove to be more difficult to reconstruct and isolate than something less substantial.  (My 3D printer for example shows rythymic patterns in straight parts, when the layer heights are not an exact multiple of the step heights ,1/1600 of 1.25mm, and the Z- stepper dithers).

                                    You will need a heated bed because one of the problems of 3D printing is that the material is applied at high temperature (170C for pla, 210C for abs) and contracts on cooling. Printing thick parts with many layers may result in the corners peeling off the bed due to the different rates of contraction. The heated bed allows the material to stretch and absorb the differentials. But once the layers are deeper than about 1cm,  small parts begin to overheat, so you need a small fan on the hotend to cool the plastic as it is deposited!  Again, something that Mach doesn't do very well as a natural function though it can be made to do so. (Assign an axis to 'fan control')

                                    HTH





                                    On 16/09/2014 19:37, 'beebear' beebear@... [mach1mach2cnc] wrote:
                                     

                                    I have an inexpensive milling machine I’d like to convert to a 3d printer. It’s made of PVC and it does pretty good at cnc.

                                     

                                    What all do I need to use Mach 3 to run it besides the heater and filament feed?

                                     

                                    Thanks for the info

                                     

                                    John Frankforther




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                                  • Hannu Venermo
                                    Because its is pretty easy to get mach to do anything else, if you can afford some hw. Most of the controllers are closed , and you cannot tune or change
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Sep 18, 2014
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                                      Because its is pretty easy to get mach to do anything else, if you can
                                      afford some hw.
                                      Most of the controllers are "closed", and you cannot tune or change
                                      them, or use better hw etc.
                                      And the hw is generally pretty poor.
                                      Everyone is competing on "how cheap can we make a poor printer".

                                      Its another end of the same problem, basically.

                                      On 17/09/2014 12:13, Robin Stoddart-Stones
                                      Robin.stoddartstones@... [mach1mach2cnc] wrote:
                                      > Your problem is to decide what it is that you want to do.
                                      >
                                      > If you want to experiment with 3D printing then converting a CNC
                                      > router is fairly simple, however one has to ask why one would use
                                      > Mach (apart from the fact that you have it).

                                      --
                                      -hanermo (cnc designs)
                                    • blunde04
                                      I used Dans write up and most of the same tools, works well. Happy to correspond with you as you get going. I would also suggest you start with PLA, and work
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Sep 19, 2014
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                                        I used Dans write up and most of the same tools, works well. Happy to correspond with you as you get going. I would also suggest you start with PLA, and work up to ABS, so you see progress faster. Some sli8cr has changed a bit, and the Mach in line tool he got from Nuri will take a bit of tweaking, but works well.
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