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Evidence for LXX usage in the NT

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  • JavaJedi2
    I know that it s commonly assumed by many scholars that the NT writers used a Greek translation, related in some way to the lXX as we know it. What if I
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 7, 2004
      I know that it's commonly assumed by many scholars that the NT
      writers used a Greek translation, related in some way to the lXX as we
      know it. What if I wanted to demonstrate, rather than assert this?
      What would be the most efficient way to demonstarte that, for my
      specific purposes, Luke-Acts uses the LXX primarily when citing the
      Sriptures of Israel? Thanks.

      Ken Litwak
      Affiliate Faculty
      Southwestern College
      Wichita, KS
    • CS Bartholomew
      ... Hello Ken, At the risk of starteing the obvious ... You could start out by identifying all the OT citations and allusions in Luke-Acts and then using
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 8, 2004
        On 4/7/04 8:49 PM, "JavaJedi2" <javajedi2@...> wrote:

        > I know that it's commonly assumed by many scholars that the NT
        > writers used a Greek translation, related in some way to the lXX as we
        > know it. What if I wanted to demonstrate, rather than assert this?
        > What would be the most efficient way to demonstarte that, for my
        > specific purposes, Luke-Acts uses the LXX primarily when citing the
        > Sriptures of Israel?

        Hello Ken,

        At the risk of starteing the obvious ...

        You could start out by identifying all the OT citations and allusions in
        Luke-Acts and then using E.Tov's MT/LXX database do a comprehensive
        comparison of the Luke-Acts citations with the MT and LXX. Assuming that
        some of these citations are also found in Qumran copies of the Hebrew Bible
        you would also need to take that data into consideration particularly where
        there is agreement between the LXX and the Qumran witnesses. In other words
        you cannot assume a citation is based on the LXX if there is a Qumran text
        which agrees with the LXX against the MT.

        There are of course a lot of technical nuances involved in this sort of
        project, like the methods you use to establish similarity between different
        witnesses, text critical issues in the LXX, and so forth.

        This is not going to be a minor project.

        kol tov,
        Clay Bartholomew
      • CS Bartholomew
        ... At the risk of stating the obvious ... CSB
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 8, 2004
          On 4/8/04 12:26 PM, "CS Bartholomew" <jacksonpollock@...> wrote:

          > At the risk of starteing the obvious ...

          At the risk of stating the obvious ...

          CSB
        • Philip Silouan Thompson
          ... As someone has said, you could start by laying out all the OT passages and allusions in Luke and Acts and comparing them with the modern Tenach and with
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 15, 2004
            Ken Litwak wrote:
            > I know that it's commonly assumed by many scholars that
            > the NT writers used a Greek translation, related in some
            > way to the lXX as we know it...
            > What would be the most efficient way to demonstarte that,
            > for my specific purposes, Luke-Acts uses the LXX primarily
            > when citing the Sriptures of Israel? Thanks.

            As someone has said, you could start by laying out all the OT passages and
            allusions in Luke and Acts and comparing them with the modern Tenach and
            with the LXX. (Not hard to do with a computer and software like the Sword
            Project: www.crosswire.org)

            I don't know if that'll prove that St Luke used the LXX, but I think you'll
            find you can defend his at least usually using a text tradition related more
            to the one underlying the LXX than to the modern Masoretic text.

            Remember to include the Scribes' testing Christ with a story of a woman
            married in succession to seven men, each of whom dies - an allusion to the
            tale of Tobit.

            Here's a table that could help you get started:
            http://students.cua.edu/16kalvesmaki/LXX/NTChart.htm

            Hope that's helpful.

            Relurking,

            Philip Silouan Thompson
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