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Re: [lxx] arguments from the silence of the critical apparatus [more]

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  • Chris B.
    Where do you buy this Gottingen book?
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 1, 2004
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      Where do you buy this Gottingen book?
    • James Miller
      ... It s not a single book, but a series. It s something like 15-20 volumes thus far. Each volume gives a reconstructed Greek text for a book, or a portion,
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 1, 2004
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        On Mon, 1 Mar 2004, Chris B. wrote:

        > Where do you buy this Gottingen book?

        It's not a single book, but a series. It's something like 15-20 volumes
        thus far. Each volume gives a reconstructed Greek text for a book, or a
        portion, of the OT. There is an extensive apparatus (which I've been
        discussing) that takes up usually 50% or more of any given page of the
        volumes and that lists variant readings to those the editor of the
        respective volume has chosen for the reconstructed (critical) text. The
        project has been ongoing for about 70 years now (! yes, my Psalmi cum Odis
        volume, which was the first published, I believe, lists the initial
        publication date as 1931) and is not yet complete. There is talk of
        reissuing (doing new editions of) the early volumes already. As has been
        discussed thus far, the introductory material is in German, as is the
        explication of signs and abbreviations used in the apparatus. The
        apparatus itself uses Latin and Latin abbreviations when comments are
        required. Now, to your question. I'm guessing it could be ordered
        through some large online retailer like amazon.com. Here's the citation
        as it appears in my library's catalogue: Septuaginta: Vetus Testamentum
        Graecum / auctoritate Academiae Litterarum Gottingensis editum, Göttinge:
        Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1931- (there's that pesky umlaut! the secret is,
        after all, copy and paste! Hey, if "Gottingensis" is good enough for
        those snooty Latins, "Gottingen" can suit just fine for us regular old
        Americans). I suppose contacting the publisher directly would be another
        way of getting, or finding out how to get, it.

        James
      • John McChesney-Young
        ... and James Miller suggested: ... Dove Booksellers lists most or all of the volumes: http://dovebook.com/new/product.asp?code=like 936 Those in Europe might
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 1, 2004
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          >On Mon, 1 Mar 2004, Chris B. wrote:
          >
          >> Where do you buy this Gottingen book?

          and James Miller suggested:

          ... I'm guessing it could be ordered
          >through some large online retailer like amazon.com.

          Dove Booksellers lists most or all of the volumes:

          http://dovebook.com/new/product.asp?code=like'936'

          Those in Europe might find ordering from Buchhandel.de easier:

          http://www.buchhandel.de/

          Putting this search string into the "Profisuche" window:

          Vetus Testamentum Graecum

          will return the series - and additionally provide
          more extensive bibliographical data. These
          results show that Dove's prices are extremely
          reasonable; e.g., the Sirach volume is list 94
          Eur in Germany and $125 from Dove, barely above
          the inter-bank exchange rate.

          (Please note that I have no connection to Dove Books other than as a customer.)

          >(there's that pesky umlaut! the secret is,
          >after all, copy and paste! Hey, if "Gottingensis" is good enough for
          >those snooty Latins, "Gottingen" can suit just fine for us regular old
          >Americans).

          Umlauted letters are not part of the universally
          understood (by computers) 7-bit character set
          called lower ASCII, and as a result are
          problematic when used in e-mail. Observation of
          their attempted use on other lists suggests that
          about 90% of recipients will see these correctly:

          ä ë ï ö ü

          but about 10% won't. See:

          http://recipes.chef2chef.net/cool/data/accented-character-recipe.htm

          for instructions for European accents for PCs and
          Macs, but don't expect them to be visible to all
          correspondents.

          One solution is to use the alternates mandated
          for Bryn Mawr Classical Review contributors:

          http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/review.html

          A slightly more intuitive option is to use a
          double quotation mark after the letter, but
          perhaps the best alternative is the long-time
          standard of replacing an umlaut with a following
          "e". See e.g. paragraph 5 here:

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaeresis

          John
          --


          *** John McChesney-Young ** panis@...
          ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A. ***
        • Michael Jay
          ... I see all non 7-bit lower ASCII as Chinese myself.
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 1, 2004
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            >
            > Umlauted letters are not part of the universally
            > understood (by computers) 7-bit character set
            > called lower ASCII, and as a result are
            > problematic when used in e-mail. Observation of
            > their attempted use on other lists suggests that
            > about 90% of recipients will see these correctly:


            I see all non 7-bit lower ASCII as Chinese myself.
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