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Psalms

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  • jtomchak1936
    hi, gang! i m working on an interliner work of the Psalms in a teach me database using Rahlfs text with 3 english translations and parsing. Brenton s (with
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 10, 2003
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      hi, gang!
      i'm working on an interliner work of the Psalms in a "teach me"
      database using Rahlfs' text with 3 english translations and parsing.
      Brenton's (with gr var. noted) the Douay ver., the kjv ver. what i need
      is some way to check on the greek behind the Douay english. Rahlfs'
      notes offer very little. is there anything out there on the internet
      that can help me? thanks, joe.
    • Steve Puluka
      ... From: jtomchak1936 ... Dear Joe, I believe that Douay used the Vulgate as the translation text. Thus there is Latin, not Greek behind
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 11, 2003
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: jtomchak1936 <jtomchak@...>

        > hi, gang!
        > i'm working on an interliner work of the Psalms in a "teach me"
        > database using Rahlfs' text with 3 english translations and parsing.
        > Brenton's (with gr var. noted) the Douay ver., the kjv ver. what i need
        > is some way to check on the greek behind the Douay english. Rahlfs'
        > notes offer very little. is there anything out there on the internet
        > that can help me? thanks, joe.

        Dear Joe,

        I believe that Douay used the Vulgate as the translation text. Thus there
        is Latin, not Greek behind the text. In the Psalms, much of this still
        follows the Old Latin with very little change towards the Hebrew. Jerome
        encountered much resistance to his move towards Hebrew in the Psalter. So
        ultimately there is a Greek original behind the Old Latin, but we don't know
        anything about it.

        See Jelicoe, "The Septuagint in Modern Study" and Swete, "Introduction to
        the Old Testament in Greek" for information on the early translations of the
        Septuagint.

        Steve Puluka
        Masters Student SS Cyril & Methodius Seminary, Pittsburgh
        Cantor in the Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
        http://www.geocities.com/spuluka
      • Andrea Nicolotti
        I would like to know your opinion on the correct translation of the psalm 9,4; it has an accusative that I cannot understand well: When my enemy is turned
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 3, 2005
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          I would like to know your opinion on the correct translation of the psalm
          9,4; it has an accusative that I cannot understand well:

          "When my enemy is turned back, they shall be feeble and perish at thy
          presence"
          or:
          "When my enemy turns back, etc"
          or:
          "When God turns back my enemy, etc."

          Which meaning? Why this strange construction?

          Thanks
          Andrea
        • Robert Kraft
          Pietersma s new translation (Oxford 2000) has: When my enemy turns back, they shall grow weak .... The construction seems to be a normal
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 5, 2005
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            Pietersma's new translation (Oxford 2000) has:

            "When my enemy turns back, they shall grow weak ...."

            The construction seems to be a "normal" accusative-with-infinitive in a temporal
            clause -- interlinearally "in the to-turn-back-my-enemy to the rear ..." (The
            infinitive is active, not passive.)

            Similar constructions abound: see
            4.2 and 4, 9.23 and 30-31, 13.7, ... 63.2, 67.8 and 15, 70.9, 75.10, ETC.
            The subject of the infinitive is normally in the accusative following the
            infinitive. For further examples and constructions, search the morphological files
            for Psalms:

            http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/gopher/text/religion/biblical/lxxmorph/28.Psalms1.mlxx
            http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/gopher/text/religion/biblical/lxxmorph/29.Psalms2.mlxx

            RAK

            > I would like to know your opinion on the correct translation of the psalm
            > 9,4; it has an accusative that I cannot understand well:
            >
            > "When my enemy is turned back, they shall be feeble and perish at thy
            > presence"
            > or:
            > "When my enemy turns back, etc"
            > or:
            > "When God turns back my enemy, etc."
            >
            > Which meaning? Why this strange construction?
            >
            > Thanks
            > Andrea
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >



            --
            Robert A. Kraft, Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania
            227 Logan Hall (Philadelphia PA 19104-6304); tel. 215 898-5827
            kraft@...
            http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rs/rak/kraft.html
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