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more on numbering the psalms

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  • William Yarchin
    On the Dead Sea Scrolls: The only numerical allusion to David’s compositions I know of from Qumran is the famous prose section in column 27 of the Cave 11
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 25, 2013
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      On the Dead Sea Scrolls: The only numerical allusion to David�s
      compositions I know of from Qumran is the famous prose section in column 27
      of the Cave 11 Psalms Scroll. There David is credited with 4,050 psalmic
      compositions. Interestingly, those lines claim for David�s oeuvre a
      conspicuous undergirding to the liturgy of the Jewish cult. In that same
      scroll, however, as in all other DSS psalms MSS, psalms are distinguished
      from each other by space intervals but not by numbering of any kind.
      Several psalms scrolls from Qumran attest to Hebrew MS evidence for the
      multiple arrangements of content not unlike the non-MT arrangement we see
      in LXX Jeremiah. Nine of the 39 Judean Desert psalms scrolls show different
      arrangements of the psalms relative to the MT, including several
      incommensurate with the 5-book division.


      On Justin�s psalms-quotations: As far as I can tell they constitute the
      earliest attestation of ordinal reference to the Psalms. Although his
      ordinal references in the Dialogue are in agreement with the LXX numbering,
      in the 1st Apology Justin quotes the whole of Psalms 1+2 as a single
      composition, unlike the LXX where they are separate. Maybe Justin tends to
      quote from a testimonia source.


      On Justin using a Jewish psalms-reference system: I hesitate to agree that
      a Jewish Trypho would be familiar with Justin�s ordinal references to
      psalms. Jewish sources never refer to the psalms ordinally until later
      midrashim, hundreds of years after Justin. Even there (in Midrash Tehillim)
      I have found only two instances of ordinal psalms-reference, and they be
      later additions to the midrash MS tradition. The Mekhilta, the Mishna, the
      Tosefta, Tanhuma, the Talmuds�none of these compendia, rife with quotations
      from and allusions to the psalms, employs numbers to identify them. Nothing
      in the Jewish sources preceding Justin (the DSS) nor following him (the
      rabbinic sources) shows recognition of a system of numbering the psalms in
      Hebrew. So I wonder whether a 2nd-century Jew Trypho would be fluent in the
      numbering system Justin uses.


      A tantalizing bit of evidence for Jewish numbering of the psalms: there is
      one palimpsest from the Cairo Genizah that has, underneath the Hebrew text
      of Yerushalmi, some psalm-text in Greek, apparently from Aquila. This Greek
      text is dated palaeographically to the 6th century and includes a
      psalm-number according to the Hebrew counting instead of the Greek counting.


      On the origins of Christian psalms-numbering: We know of eight papyri best
      described as school-exercises that have biblical psalms. For example, on
      its recto *P.Lond.Lit.* 207 (LDAB 3473) has Psalms 11:7-14:4 and on its
      verso Isocrates� *ad Demonicum* 26-28, albeit from a different yet
      contemporary hand. Both recto and verso feature syllable-division dots,
      pointing to use in an educational setting. Nomina sacra and contractions
      for kurios and theos on the recto suggest a Christian milieu. Could papyri
      like this reflect a Christian school context in which scripture (at least
      the psalms) was studied along with Greek literature? Inasmuch as the latter
      tended to include enumeration of book-sections, perhaps the (exclusively,
      originally?) Christian practice of numbering psalms came about in such
      settings and fit well in the Christian liturgical context as well.


      Bill



      --
      William Yarchin, Ph.D.
      Dean's Endowed Professor of Biblical Studies
      Azusa Pacific University
      626/969-3434 ext. 5683


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Joel Kalvesmaki
      Dear Bill (if I may), Your paragraph below esp. intrigued me. Could you give an example of Greek literature s (prose, not poetry, right?) enumeration of book
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 27, 2013
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        Dear Bill (if I may),

        Your paragraph below esp. intrigued me. Could you give an example of Greek
        literature's (prose, not poetry, right?) enumeration of book sections? I
        assume you mean subsections of books, or did you mean just book units? If
        the former, are these numeration schemes individual or shared? That is, do
        we find a common numbering scheme of internal parts of a given text from
        one MS/papyrus to another? Or would the numbering scheme be tailored to
        each specific MS/papyrus? Any references you might know would be helpful.

        Best wishes,

        jk

        On Fri, Jan 25, 2013 at 2:42 PM, William Yarchin <BYarchin@...> wrote:

        > On the origins of Christian psalms-numbering: We know of eight papyri best
        > described as school-exercises that have biblical psalms. For example, on
        > its recto *P.Lond.Lit.* 207 (LDAB 3473) has Psalms 11:7-14:4 and on its
        > verso Isocrates’ *ad Demonicum* 26-28, albeit from a different yet
        > contemporary hand. Both recto and verso feature syllable-division dots,
        > pointing to use in an educational setting. Nomina sacra and contractions
        > for kurios and theos on the recto suggest a Christian milieu. Could papyri
        > like this reflect a Christian school context in which scripture (at least
        > the psalms) was studied along with Greek literature? Inasmuch as the latter
        > tended to include enumeration of book-sections, perhaps the (exclusively,
        > originally?) Christian practice of numbering psalms came about in such
        > settings and fit well in the Christian liturgical context as well.
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Robert Kraft
        I decided to check for numbered items in the materials I ve been collecting for a projected updated version of Roberts and Skeat on the birth of the codex
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 27, 2013
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          I decided to check for numbered items in the materials I've been
          collecting for a projected updated version of Roberts and Skeat on the
          birth of the codex
          (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rak/courses/735/book/codex-rev1.html), and
          found a couple of possibly relevant items:

          P. Rylands 1 53 (Pack 1106) parchment Homer; 3/4 century ce, quire
          number present

          M-P 2712 [Paraliterary Papyri 0278LDAB 5315 Cribiore 385] Lond BM 37533
          school word lists (8[9] wooden tablets 3rd c; two student hands, both
          sides; ##6-8 blank; "pages" numbered both sides)

          I'm not in a position to check the details right now, but thought it
          might be worth adding to the discussion.

          Bob Kraft, emeritus UPenn

          On 1/27/2013 9:33 PM, Joel Kalvesmaki wrote:
          > Dear Bill (if I may),
          >
          > Your paragraph below esp. intrigued me. Could you give an example of Greek
          > literature's (prose, not poetry, right?) enumeration of book sections? I
          > assume you mean subsections of books, or did you mean just book units? If
          > the former, are these numeration schemes individual or shared? That is, do
          > we find a common numbering scheme of internal parts of a given text from
          > one MS/papyrus to another? Or would the numbering scheme be tailored to
          > each specific MS/papyrus? Any references you might know would be helpful.
          >
          > Best wishes,
          >
          > jk
          >
          > On Fri, Jan 25, 2013 at 2:42 PM, William Yarchin <BYarchin@...> wrote:
          >
          >> On the origins of Christian psalms-numbering: We know of eight papyri best
          >> described as school-exercises that have biblical psalms. For example, on
          >> its recto *P.Lond.Lit.* 207 (LDAB 3473) has Psalms 11:7-14:4 and on its
          >> verso Isocrates’ *ad Demonicum* 26-28, albeit from a different yet
          >> contemporary hand. Both recto and verso feature syllable-division dots,
          >> pointing to use in an educational setting. Nomina sacra and contractions
          >> for kurios and theos on the recto suggest a Christian milieu. Could papyri
          >> like this reflect a Christian school context in which scripture (at least
          >> the psalms) was studied along with Greek literature? Inasmuch as the latter
          >> tended to include enumeration of book-sections, perhaps the (exclusively,
          >> originally?) Christian practice of numbering psalms came about in such
          >> settings and fit well in the Christian liturgical context as well.
          >>
          >>
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • david lynn reedy
          My question would be was there and sort of numbering system taht was employed by Jerome or Philo, by the Rabbics of the Exilic period, or back even to Solomon
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 28, 2013
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            My question would be was there and sort of numbering system taht was employed by Jerome or Philo, by the Rabbics of the Exilic period, or back even to Solomon and David?



            ________________________________
            From: Robert Kraft <kraft@...>
            To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2013 10:31 PM
            Subject: Re: [lxx] more on numbering texts in antiquity


             

            I decided to check for numbered items in the materials I've been
            collecting for a projected updated version of Roberts and Skeat on the
            birth of the codex
            (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rak/courses/735/book/codex-rev1.html), and
            found a couple of possibly relevant items:

            P. Rylands 1 53 (Pack 1106) parchment Homer; 3/4 century ce, quire
            number present

            M-P 2712 [Paraliterary Papyri 0278LDAB 5315 Cribiore 385] Lond BM 37533
            school word lists (8[9] wooden tablets 3rd c; two student hands, both
            sides; ##6-8 blank; "pages" numbered both sides)

            I'm not in a position to check the details right now, but thought it
            might be worth adding to the discussion.

            Bob Kraft, emeritus UPenn

            On 1/27/2013 9:33 PM, Joel Kalvesmaki wrote:
            > Dear Bill (if I may),
            >
            > Your paragraph below esp. intrigued me. Could you give an example of Greek
            > literature's (prose, not poetry, right?) enumeration of book sections? I
            > assume you mean subsections of books, or did you mean just book units? If
            > the former, are these numeration schemes individual or shared? That is, do
            > we find a common numbering scheme of internal parts of a given text from
            > one MS/papyrus to another? Or would the numbering scheme be tailored to
            > each specific MS/papyrus? Any references you might know would be helpful.
            >
            > Best wishes,
            >
            > jk
            >
            > On Fri, Jan 25, 2013 at 2:42 PM, William Yarchin mailto:BYarchin%40apu.edu> wrote:
            >
            >> On the origins of Christian psalms-numbering: We know of eight papyri best
            >> described as school-exercises that have biblical psalms. For example, on
            >> its recto *P.Lond.Lit.* 207 (LDAB 3473) has Psalms 11:7-14:4 and on its
            >> verso Isocrates’ *ad Demonicum* 26-28, albeit from a different yet
            >> contemporary hand. Both recto and verso feature syllable-division dots,
            >> pointing to use in an educational setting. Nomina sacra and contractions
            >> for kurios and theos on the recto suggest a Christian milieu. Could papyri
            >> like this reflect a Christian school context in which scripture (at least
            >> the psalms) was studied along with Greek literature? Inasmuch as the latter
            >> tended to include enumeration of book-sections, perhaps the (exclusively,
            >> originally?) Christian practice of numbering psalms came about in such
            >> settings and fit well in the Christian liturgical context as well.
            >>
            >>
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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