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Re: [lxx] Re: Ho Strategos vs. Ho Arxwn in Daniel 10:13

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  • Darrell H. Smith
    Sar is indeed ruler, prince, or αρχων. However, in the specific application of waging warfare, taken in the context of the leader of a host of fighters,
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 19, 2010
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      Sar is indeed ruler, prince, or αρχων. However, in the specific application of
      waging warfare, taken in the context of the leader of a host of fighters,
      στρατεγος is also perfectly valid as a translation. It is, after all, just a
      translation, and in translation, license is taken to convey meaning to an
      audience who do not know the original language.

      Darrell

      On Monday 18 January 2010 11:48:22 pm you wrote:
      > While reading Daniel 10:13 in BibleWorks 8, I noticed that the BGT
      > uses the phrase Ho Strategos basilews while Daniel (TH) 10:13 has ho
      > arxwn basileias. Either Ho Strategos translates the Hebrew Sar or
      > arxwn translates it. In classical Greek, ho strategos means "the
      > general" whereas in the Septuaginta it seems to mean "ruler" or
      > "captain" whereas arxn means "ruler, lord, or prince." Here,
      > whichever Greek word properly translates Sar, the Greek dictionary
      > translates arxanggelos whence we get "archangel." In this passage,
      > "prince" means a tutelary angel or a guardian angel of a nation, based
      > on the ancient Jewish idea that different nations had tutelary gods
      > (for the henotheistic Israelites) and tutelary angels or guardian
      > angels (for the monotheistic Israelites).
      >
      > Why the difference in the two Greek versions of the lxx? Also, I'm
      > doing some research on Jewish astrology, particularly as it pertains
      > to the idea in Daniel 10:13-14 that celestial battles take place in
      > heaven, in this case between Prince Michael, the guardian angel of
      > Israel, and the Prince of the kings of Persia, the guardian angel of
      > Persia. This means that victory for Michael in his celestial battle
      > with the angels of other countries means victory for the Israelites on
      > Earth, while defeat for Michael means defeat for the Israelites. Note
      > that in Chapter 10 an unknown angel is speaking to Daniel, but
      > 10:21-11:1 is a later editorial interpolation that seems to connect
      > the chapter to the previous chapter when the angel Gabriel was
      > speaking to Daniel, so in theory the angel Gabriel is speaking to
      > Daniel in chapter 10 as well. Anyone have any recommendations for
      > books on Jewish astrology? Thanks.
      >
      > Yours,
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