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About Ralph's Septuagint

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  • Andrew
    Ralph s Septuagint The text of the Ralph s Septuagint is not supported nor by the reliable lxx manuscripts, nor by the word of god in the new testament. I
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 6, 2002
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      Ralph’s Septuagint
       
      The text of the Ralph’s Septuagint is not supported nor by the reliable lxx manuscripts, nor by the word of god in the new testament. I wonder how Ralph may have courage to remove from the psalms the famous passage where it is written, that the body of Jesus is given for sacrifice.
       
      Brenton LXX
      "Psalm 39:6 Sacrifice and offering Thou wouldest not; but a body hast thou prepared me: whole-burnt-offering and sacrifice for sin thou didst not require. Then I said, Behold, I come: in the volume of the book it is written concerning me, I desired to do thy will, O my God, and thy law in the midst of mine heart.
       
      replaced by Ralph with this:
       
      Ralph LXX:
      39:6 Sacrifice and offering thou didst not desire; mine ears hast thou opened: burnt offering and sin offering hast thou not required. Then said I, Lo, I come: in the volume of the book it is written of me, ...
       
      How great critic, how great scientist is that Ralph.
      I thing that this is real blasphemy. He even replaces the will of god, because it is written "I desired to do thy will, O my God, and thy law in the midst of mine heart."
      Nevertheless I can see on the internet that there are organizations that even translate this pervert and profane text.????
    • David C. Hindley
      Andrew, If you expect to be taken seriously, can you please get the editor s name right? It is Alfred Rahlfs. The edition he edited was _Septuaginta_, being an
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 9, 2002
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        Andrew,

        If you expect to be taken seriously, can you please get the
        editor's name right? It is Alfred Rahlfs. The edition he
        edited was _Septuaginta_, being an eclectic text of the "Old
        Greek" Jewish scriptures.

        Of course an eclectic text will choose between variants, but
        you are imagining things if you think the editor's choice
        was made only because it was at variance with the text as
        found in a quotation contained in a book of the NT!

        Sir Lancelot Brenton's edition of the LXX is based upon a
        single source, codex Vaticanus, with some variants from
        codex Alexandrinus mentioned in the footnotes, but not
        affecting, I believe, the translation, except in a few cases
        where the Vaticanus manuscript was mutilated and
        Alexandrinus provided the next best text (and these cases
        are enumerated in an appendix).

        Likewise, Rahlfs' edition is also based upon Codex
        Vaticanus, but textual variants found in codex Alexandrinus
        and codex Sinaiticus are adopted in preference to those in
        codex Vaticanus based upon Rahlfs' critical opinion. I am
        very sure he is using standard text critical methodology to
        judge which are more likely representative of the "Old
        Greek" version used by the majority of Jews.

        However, it is certain that all the existing manuscripts
        (Vaticanus, Alexandrinus or Sinaiticus) preserve a mixture
        of text types (those of the "Old Greek" mainly and of
        Theodotian in the case of at least a couple books, plus
        possibly others), and several Greek translations of
        individual books of Jewish scripture were known to be
        circulating in antiquity. Any one of them could have been
        used by the author of a NT book.

        Are you getting your material from a tract or something?

        Respectfully,

        Dave Hindley
        Cleveland, Ohio, USA
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