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Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew/Aramaic text

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  • frankclancy
    Hello - would someone be kind enough to tell me what is the oldest known text or the oldest known reference to a Greek translation of a Hebrew or Jewish/Judean
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 6, 2009
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      Hello - would someone be kind enough to tell me what is the oldest known text or the oldest known reference to a Greek translation of a Hebrew or Jewish/Judean Aramaic text? Please do not point me to the Letter of Aristeas. I have my fingers crossed. Thanks

      Frank Clancy
    • andrew fincke
      Dear Frank, See Swete, Introduction, chapters 1-3. At page 31 he quotes Epiphanius about Aquila. Being ever unsure whether Greek letters will be delivered
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 6, 2009
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        Dear Frank,

        See Swete, Introduction, chapters 1-3. At page 31 he quotes Epiphanius about Aquila. Being ever unsure whether Greek letters will be delivered properly to the list and putting my neck on the line from the firing squad of Greek native speakers, I give a translation of what I read:

        "Adrianos ... set him at the head of the work.. Being embittered, he changed religion and was circumcized a Jew. Assiduously and ambitiously he taught himself Hebrew grammar and syntax. Having learned this to the core, he translated not word for word, but rather paraphrastically in such a way that he perverted some of the scripture, intruding on the translation of the 72 so as to twist the prophetic references to Christ." (For "72" see Swete, 15.)

        Andrew Fincke



        To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
        From: clancyfrank@...
        Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 07:14:01 +0000
        Subject: [lxx] Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew/Aramaic text





        Hello - would someone be kind enough to tell me what is the oldest known text or the oldest known reference to a Greek translation of a Hebrew or Jewish/Judean Aramaic text? Please do not point me to the Letter of Aristeas. I have my fingers crossed. Thanks

        Frank Clancy









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        Windows Live´┐Ż: Keep your life in sync.
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ken Penner
        The prologue to Sirach would be earlier than Epiphanius. I m not sure when to date the Greek postscript to Job 42:17. Before the Hellenistic period there
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 7, 2009
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          The prologue to Sirach would be earlier than Epiphanius. I'm not sure
          when to date the Greek postscript to Job 42:17. Before the Hellenistic
          period there wouldn't have been much demand to translate Hebrew and
          Aramaic into Greek, and I can't think of any Jewish writers between the
          beginning of the Hellenistic period and ben Sira who might have
          discussed translating into Greek.

          Are you wondering how much precedent there was for the translation of
          the scriptures from Hebrew to Greek?

          Ken


          Ken M. Penner, Ph.D.
          Assistant Professor, Religious Studies
          St. Francis Xavier University
          kpenner@...



          -----Original Message-----
          From: lxx@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lxx@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          andrew fincke
          Sent: August 6, 2009 12:56 PM
          To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [lxx] Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew/Aramaic text


          Dear Frank,

          See Swete, Introduction, chapters 1-3. At page 31 he quotes Epiphanius
          about Aquila. Being ever unsure whether Greek letters will be delivered
          properly to the list and putting my neck on the line from the firing
          squad of Greek native speakers, I give a translation of what I read:

          "Adrianos ... set him at the head of the work.. Being embittered, he
          changed religion and was circumcized a Jew. Assiduously and ambitiously
          he taught himself Hebrew grammar and syntax. Having learned this to the
          core, he translated not word for word, but rather paraphrastically in
          such a way that he perverted some of the scripture, intruding on the
          translation of the 72 so as to twist the prophetic references to
          Christ." (For "72" see Swete, 15.)

          Andrew Fincke



          To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
          From: clancyfrank@...
          Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 07:14:01 +0000
          Subject: [lxx] Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew/Aramaic text





          Hello - would someone be kind enough to tell me what is the oldest known
          text or the oldest known reference to a Greek translation of a Hebrew or
          Jewish/Judean Aramaic text? Please do not point me to the Letter of
          Aristeas. I have my fingers crossed. Thanks

          Frank Clancy









          _________________________________________________________________
          Windows Live(tm): Keep your life in sync.
          http://windowslive.com/explore?ocid=PID23384::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:NF_B
          R_sync:082009

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        • frankclancy
          Dear Ken - thanks for the suggestion. However, I have a small problem. I believe I shall have an article published about The Date of Ben Sira in which I
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 8, 2009
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            Dear Ken - thanks for the suggestion. However, I have a small problem. I believe I shall have an article published about "The Date of Ben Sira" in which I argue that Ben sira was written probably after his grandson went to Egypt or about 132-100 BCE and the grandson would have written the prologue about 100-80 BCE. Others have suggested Demetrius the Chronographer but I published an article demonstrating that Demetrius used the year 141 BCE as the base year for his chronography and I suggested there is no evidence placing him earlier than 100 BCE. And so on. I keep asking the same question - what is the earliest certain evidence of a Greek translation of a Judean text but I cannot get a satisfactory answer from any LXX scholar.

            Frank Clancy


            --- In lxx@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Penner" <kpenner@...> wrote:
            >
            > The prologue to Sirach would be earlier than Epiphanius. I'm not sure
            > when to date the Greek postscript to Job 42:17. Before the Hellenistic
            > period there wouldn't have been much demand to translate Hebrew and
            > Aramaic into Greek, and I can't think of any Jewish writers between the
            > beginning of the Hellenistic period and ben Sira who might have
            > discussed translating into Greek.
            >
            > Are you wondering how much precedent there was for the translation of
            > the scriptures from Hebrew to Greek?
            >
            > Ken
            >
            >
            > Ken M. Penner, Ph.D.
            > Assistant Professor, Religious Studies
            > St. Francis Xavier University
            > kpenner@...
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: lxx@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lxx@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            > andrew fincke
            > Sent: August 6, 2009 12:56 PM
            > To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: RE: [lxx] Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew/Aramaic text
            >
            >
            > Dear Frank,
            >
            > See Swete, Introduction, chapters 1-3. At page 31 he quotes Epiphanius
            > about Aquila. Being ever unsure whether Greek letters will be delivered
            > properly to the list and putting my neck on the line from the firing
            > squad of Greek native speakers, I give a translation of what I read:
            >
            > "Adrianos ... set him at the head of the work.. Being embittered, he
            > changed religion and was circumcized a Jew. Assiduously and ambitiously
            > he taught himself Hebrew grammar and syntax. Having learned this to the
            > core, he translated not word for word, but rather paraphrastically in
            > such a way that he perverted some of the scripture, intruding on the
            > translation of the 72 so as to twist the prophetic references to
            > Christ." (For "72" see Swete, 15.)
            >
            > Andrew Fincke
            >
            >
            >
            > To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
            > From: clancyfrank@...
            > Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 07:14:01 +0000
            > Subject: [lxx] Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew/Aramaic text
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Hello - would someone be kind enough to tell me what is the oldest known
            > text or the oldest known reference to a Greek translation of a Hebrew or
            > Jewish/Judean Aramaic text? Please do not point me to the Letter of
            > Aristeas. I have my fingers crossed. Thanks
            >
            > Frank Clancy
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > _________________________________________________________________
            > Windows Live(tm): Keep your life in sync.
            > http://windowslive.com/explore?ocid=PID23384::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:NF_B
            > R_sync:082009
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
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