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Phillestines

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  • Peter Papoutsis
    Dear All: Has there ever been any clear cut information on the use of the word Phillestine in the LXX Pentateuch and the Greek word Allophili in the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 13, 2007
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      Dear All:
       
      Has there ever been any clear cut information on the use of the word "Phillestine" in the LXX Pentateuch and the Greek word "Allophili" in the reminder of the LXX Old Testament. Further, does "Allophili" refer to the Phillestines" or does it just mean "Foreigners"?


      Peter A. Papoutsis


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    • Philip Silouan Thompson
      ... Hi Peter, Translators have to decide whether something is a description (to be translated) or a proper name (to be transliterated). I ve seen a number of
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 23, 2007
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        Peter Papoutsis wrote:
        > The Septuagint in Psalm 67 reads
        > 15 The mountain of God is a rich mountain;
        > a curdled mountain, a rich mountain.
        >
        > The Masoretic Psalm 68 reads:
        > 16. The mountain of God is a fertile mountain,
        > the mountain of majestic peaks is a fertile mountain.
        > - Tehillim Ohel Yosef Yitzchak
        >
        > This is very interesting because most English
        > translations of the Hebrew translate fertile mountain
        > as Mountain of Bashan. Yet this English translation
        > of the Psalms from the Hebrew actually has a very
        > accurate translation of both the Hebrew and Greek
        > where the Greek can be translated at Rich, Fat or Fertile.


        Hi Peter,

        Translators have to decide whether something is a description (to be
        translated) or a proper name (to be transliterated). I've seen a number
        of places in the Psalter where the LXX translators chose differently
        from most modern English translators.

        You mentioned Ps. 67 where the word bashan is translated, though
        elsewhere it's left as a name (e.g. Og, king of the land of Basan in Ps.
        135). Idle thought: What if someone rendered it everywhere: Og, king of
        the rich country? or Og, king of the land of rich brown soil? Of course
        that goes way beyond translation.

        In Ps. 59 and 107, the LXX translators put "valley of tabernacles",
        translating the Hebrew, where the KJV treats it asa name: "Valley of
        Succoth".

        There's a proper name Etham in the OT; it was one of the places Israel
        stopped after the parting of the Red Sea. cf. Ex. 13:20; Num. 33:6,7. So
        in Ps. 73, the LXX translators took "etham" to be a proper name: "Thou
        driedst up the rivers of Etham" where English Bibles usually translate
        it: thou driedst up mighty rivers (KJV Ps. 74:15.

        Elsewhere you mentioned the Philistines; there the Greeks translator
        paraphrased the Hebrew word p'lishti (invaders, foreigners) into
        "allophyloi" while other Greeks transliterated it giving us Philistia,
        Philistines, and (via Latin) Palestine.

        Just some more examples to add to your list. I'm sure there are many
        more; I've only been looking at the Psalms.

        Silouan Thompson
        Walla Walla, Washington USA
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