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Re: [lxx] Changes in the LXX from the Hebrew

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  • Steve Puluka
    ... Jack, There are several reasons that can explain why an LXX text departs from the MT Hebrew tradition. 1-The LXX translator could see a different point
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 25, 2005
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      vogtjack wrote:
      >
      > In Ps 43:27 LXX the Greek uses TOU ONOMATOS SOU for the Hebrew hesd
      > and the Greek inserts Lord in the vocative case in the previous line.
      > Why does the Greek add Lord and not put it in the same line as your
      > name? There are many times where the Greek has inserted the name into
      > the text. Any idea why this is? Do we know when the tradition started
      > where YHWH'S name is not spoken or, more to the point, when
      > replacements were used for it like we find in the Greek OT?

      Jack,

      There are several reasons that can explain why an LXX text departs from
      the MT Hebrew tradition.

      1-The LXX translator could see a different point and/or word division in
      the same base text as the MT.
      2-The LXX translator could "miss read" the same base text as the MT with
      errors or expansions.
      3-The LXX translator could be smoothing out a difficult reading in the
      same base text as the MT
      4-The LXX translator could have a different Hebrew text

      I think here we are dealing with situation number four. The differences
      are too large to easily explain in other ways. Number two is possible,
      but I don't think there would be a good reason for this particular
      expansion in the translation. In other words, there would not be a good
      motivation to expand this text on the translators part and the
      mistranslation of hesd is too far moved from the text to be called a
      translation.

      We do know from text criticism studies and the finding of the Dead Sea
      Scrolls that there were textual differences in the Hebrew texts in
      antiquity that ultimately standardized with the MT tradition.
      Unfortunately, the surviving examples are scattered throughout the Old
      Testament and small by comparison.

      But the Psalm scrolls at Qumran demonstrate that the Psalter was far
      from fixed in both order and text before the Masorah come to work.

      None of these deal with the specific text in question but all will help
      you get the lay of the land in textual studies of the LXX & MT.

      Klein, Ralph W. Textual criticism of the Old Testament : the Septuagint
      after Qumran. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1974.


      Tov, Emanuel. Textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible. Minneapolis:
      Fortress Press, 1992.

      Wurthwein, Ernst. The text of the Old Testament : an introduction to the
      Biblia Hebraica. Translated by Erroll Rhodes. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids:
      Eerdmans, 1979.


      --
      Steve Puluka
      Masters Student, SS Cyril & Methodius Seminary
      Cantor, Holy Ghost Church, Mckees Rocks PA
      http://www.puluka.com
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