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2244RE: [lxx] question

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  • andrew fincke
    May 1, 2007
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      Dear Dmitri,
      Liddell-Scott, 1365 bottom is unambiguous as to peraths. It's a wanderer
      that Philo explains as Ebraios. Here's the place from Philo, De migratione
      Abrahami, cited from BibleWorks 7:
      to. auvcei/n evpi. tw/| ge,noj ei=nai ~Ebrai,wn( oi-j e;qoj avpo. tw/n
      aivsqhtw/n evpi. ta. nohta. metani,stasqai pera,thj ga.r o` ~Ebrai/oj
      e`rmhneu,etai(
      It basically says:
      "To boast to be of the race of the Hebrews, whose natural instinct was to
      move around, since peraths means Ebraios (Hebrew)".
      Andrew Fincke


      >From: "Tony Costa" <tmcos@...>
      >Reply-To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
      >To: <lxx@yahoogroups.com>
      >Subject: RE: [lxx] question
      >Date: Sat, 28 Apr 2007 14:48:28 -0400
      >
      >The Greek word PERATH (from PERATHS) carries the meaning of "migrant" and
      >"wanderer" which is what Brenton's footnote is alluding to. This may
      >correspond to the possible meaning of the word "Hebrew" in the MT. Abram
      >(later Abraham) was told to leave Ur of the Chaldees (Mesopotamia) and he
      >moved westward towards Canaan (Gen. 12:1ff). Thus the emphasis on the west
      >side of the east (Mesopotamia). Some see this term as having reference to
      >Abraham's forefather Eber (Gen. 10:21). Best wishes,
      >
      >
      >
      >Tony Costa, PhD (cand)
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      >From: lxx@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lxx@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dmitri
      >zagvazdin
      >Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2007 2:11 PM
      >To: lxx@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [lxx] question
      >
      >
      >
      >Brenton translates GENESIS 14:13 as "And one of them that had been rescued
      >came and told Abram the Hebrew..." And yet the Greek word he is translating
      >as "Hebrew" is peratn (my transliteration without a Greek font). What does
      >this word mean? Surely not "Hebrew." The closest I could find in a Greek
      >dictionary was "on the opposite side, of the west as opposed to the east."
      >Brenton's footnote says "Greek: passer." What is he saying?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
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      >
      >
      >

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