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1465Re: [lxx] Psalms

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  • Robert Kraft
    Jan 5, 2005
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      Pietersma's new translation (Oxford 2000) has:

      "When my enemy turns back, they shall grow weak ...."

      The construction seems to be a "normal" accusative-with-infinitive in a temporal
      clause -- interlinearally "in the to-turn-back-my-enemy to the rear ..." (The
      infinitive is active, not passive.)

      Similar constructions abound: see
      4.2 and 4, 9.23 and 30-31, 13.7, ... 63.2, 67.8 and 15, 70.9, 75.10, ETC.
      The subject of the infinitive is normally in the accusative following the
      infinitive. For further examples and constructions, search the morphological files
      for Psalms:

      http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/gopher/text/religion/biblical/lxxmorph/28.Psalms1.mlxx
      http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/gopher/text/religion/biblical/lxxmorph/29.Psalms2.mlxx

      RAK

      > I would like to know your opinion on the correct translation of the psalm
      > 9,4; it has an accusative that I cannot understand well:
      >
      > "When my enemy is turned back, they shall be feeble and perish at thy
      > presence"
      > or:
      > "When my enemy turns back, etc"
      > or:
      > "When God turns back my enemy, etc."
      >
      > Which meaning? Why this strange construction?
      >
      > Thanks
      > Andrea
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Robert A. Kraft, Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania
      227 Logan Hall (Philadelphia PA 19104-6304); tel. 215 898-5827
      kraft@...
      http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rs/rak/kraft.html
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