Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Collimating trouble

Expand Messages
  • Fernando
    Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob s knobs could be of some help to you: http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf With the outer
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 1, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob's knobs could be of some help to you:

      http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf

      With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly, and then check if some of the inner collimation screws is out of place and maybe one of the springs misaligned. With the secondary assembly being removed you can also check the two "baffle tubes" at both sides of the corrector plate, and retighten them if needed (they are screwed one into the other).
      Good luck (and be very carefull when manipulating the secondary!)

      Fernando

      --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@..." wrote:
      >
      > I am having a huge issue with collimation. I have an 8" LX90 ACF purchased in 2010. I can't figure out if there is a mis-print in my manual, or if my particular model is laid out differently than most Meades with respect to the collimating screws. All I can say for sure is that my secondary is loose and I don't know what screws to tighten to fix it.
      >
      > I tried to collimate for the first time about 6 months ago when I started some photography. Visually, it never needed an adjustment. So, I read the manual where it clearly had a diagram pointing to the OUTER 3 screws as the ones to use to collimate. So these are the ones I used. I had trouble getting a good result so I brought it in to the shop where I bought it for some coaching. They said no, no, no use the inner 3 screws, not the outer 3. All Meade scopes are like that. So we tightened down the outer 3 and collimated using the inner 3.
      >
      > That seemed good for a while,but now here I am months later and I can't get a clear focus at all. After trying to collimate using the inner screws again I simply can't get a good result. In fact, the secondary is tilted so badly now that my out of focus star is oval rather than round. I have also noticed that the secondary housing that holds the screws is now loose, even though the outer 3 screws are snug.
      >
      > Is my manual correct after all? Is it the inner or outer screws that I should use for collimation? How do I fix this without doing any more damage?!
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Joe
      >
    • joe.bonner@rogers.com
      Thanks so much for that Fernando. It looks like I might be able to fix this myself after all. I just need to work up the courage to take tools to my scope! I
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 3, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks so much for that Fernando. It looks like I might be able to fix this
        myself after all. I just need to work up the courage to take tools to my
        scope! I hope it's just a miss aligned spring.

        Thanks again,
        Joe

        --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "Fernando" wrote:
        >
        > Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob's knobs could be of some help to you:
        >
        > http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
        >
        > With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly, and then check if some of the inner collimation screws is out of place and maybe one of the springs misaligned. With the secondary assembly being removed you can also check the two "baffle tubes" at both sides of the corrector plate, and retighten them if needed (they are screwed one into the other).
        > Good luck (and be very carefull when manipulating the secondary!)
        >
        > Fernando
        >
        > --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
        > >
        > > I am having a huge issue with collimation. I have an 8" LX90 ACF purchased in 2010. I can't figure out if there is a mis-print in my manual, or if my particular model is laid out differently than most Meades with respect to the collimating screws. All I can say for sure is that my secondary is loose and I don't know what screws to tighten to fix it.
        > >
        > > I tried to collimate for the first time about 6 months ago when I started some photography. Visually, it never needed an adjustment. So, I read the manual where it clearly had a diagram pointing to the OUTER 3 screws as the ones to use to collimate. So these are the ones I used. I had trouble getting a good result so I brought it in to the shop where I bought it for some coaching. They said no, no, no use the inner 3 screws, not the outer 3. All Meade scopes are like that. So we tightened down the outer 3 and collimated using the inner 3.
        > >
        > > That seemed good for a while,but now here I am months later and I can't get a clear focus at all. After trying to collimate using the inner screws again I simply can't get a good result. In fact, the secondary is tilted so badly now that my out of focus star is oval rather than round. I have also noticed that the secondary housing that holds the screws is now loose, even though the outer 3 screws are snug.
        > >
        > > Is my manual correct after all? Is it the inner or outer screws that I should use for collimation? How do I fix this without doing any more damage?!
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > > Joe
        > >
        >
      • John Hilliard
        We purchased a previously owned 8 LX 90 ACF about eight months ago and have been very satisfied with it. Last month over new moon weekend we noticed some
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 4, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          We purchased a previously owned 8" LX 90 ACF about eight months ago and have been very satisfied with it. Last month over new moon weekend we noticed some issues with the tracking. We use a Mallincam and would notice that even when the GOTO beeps that it has arrived that there would be still be some slight movement in Alt or Az or sometimes both. Occasionally I would bump the opposite direction arrow key to get it to stop and sometimes we would just wait it out.

          We would center the object in on the monitor and would sometimes get the same drift, sometimes not. Once we went to a longer integration (exposure) time it might take two or three refreshes before we could get a stable image.

          The settling down after a GOTO had been occurring for a couple of outings but the tracking issue just started the last night of our last new moon trip. I wrote it off to one of the clutches being a bit too loose and forgot about it.

          Saturday evening we went to an outreach session at a local park and I went to M-42 and just left it there for the public to observe. Every once in a while I would check to see if the Trapezium was still centered and would bring it back to center. Again not worrying much as people have a tendency to bump the scope and I was just recentering.

          Last night I set up the scope and centered the Trapezium in an 11mm plossl. I noticed it slowly would drift down and to the left in the FOV. I re-centered a few times and after a half hour it would be halfway to the lower left.

          This is something new. Typically it would hold for what seemed extended periods of time and the only 'smear' issues we ever had with the Mallincam was on longer integrations and if someone walked by and a vibration was picked up.

          We do have a counterweight bar on the scope and have it well balanced in Altitude. We work only in Alt/Az. I have been concerned about just how tight to crank the Azimuth clutch lock...not to over tighten but again to secure it. But I have never cranked it as tight as I could turn it by hand.

          With the image dropping in the FOV, it would seem that the OTA is rising too fast. (Orion was in the Southeast and we never tracked it across the meridian last evening...but did on Saturday night.) Also, trying to keep things straight with a mirror image, it would seem that tracking in Azimuth is also a bit fast? I do get confused on the east west movement and the mirror image thing so if moving east in the FOV...it is actually moving west???

          Anyway, any help or insight would be appreciated.

          For six of the eight months the scope has been almost flawless so what did I do?

          John


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • P. Clay Sherrod
          Hello John....what you describe sound very much like you simply need to train drives on the mount again, very carefully in Alt Az on a distant landmark. In
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 4, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello John....what you describe sound very much like you simply need to train
            drives on the mount again, very carefully in Alt Az on a distant landmark.
            In addition, being out of balance will cause the same symptoms you describe.
            Check these things and run some more tests.

            Dr. Clay
            _____
            Arkansas Sky Observatories
            MPC H45 - Petit Jean Mountain South
            MPC H41 - Petit Jean Mountain
            MPC H43 - Conway West
            http://www.arksky.org/

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "John Hilliard" <jhilliard4@...>
            To: <lx90@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 12:18 PM
            Subject: [lx90] Tracking Issues


            > We purchased a previously owned 8" LX 90 ACF about eight months ago and have
            > been very satisfied with it. Last month over new moon weekend we noticed some
            > issues with the tracking. We use a Mallincam and would notice that even when
            > the GOTO beeps that it has arrived that there would be still be some slight
            > movement in Alt or Az or sometimes both. Occasionally I would bump the
            > opposite direction arrow key to get it to stop and sometimes we would just
            > wait it out.
            >
            > We would center the object in on the monitor and would sometimes get the same
            > drift, sometimes not. Once we went to a longer integration (exposure) time it
            > might take two or three refreshes before we could get a stable image.
            >
            > The settling down after a GOTO had been occurring for a couple of outings but
            > the tracking issue just started the last night of our last new moon trip. I
            > wrote it off to one of the clutches being a bit too loose and forgot about it.
            >
            > Saturday evening we went to an outreach session at a local park and I went to
            > M-42 and just left it there for the public to observe. Every once in a while
            > I would check to see if the Trapezium was still centered and would bring it
            > back to center. Again not worrying much as people have a tendency to bump the
            > scope and I was just recentering.
            >
            > Last night I set up the scope and centered the Trapezium in an 11mm plossl. I
            > noticed it slowly would drift down and to the left in the FOV. I re-centered
            > a few times and after a half hour it would be halfway to the lower left.
            >
            > This is something new. Typically it would hold for what seemed extended
            > periods of time and the only 'smear' issues we ever had with the Mallincam was
            > on longer integrations and if someone walked by and a vibration was picked up.
            >
            > We do have a counterweight bar on the scope and have it well balanced in
            > Altitude. We work only in Alt/Az. I have been concerned about just how tight
            > to crank the Azimuth clutch lock...not to over tighten but again to secure it.
            > But I have never cranked it as tight as I could turn it by hand.
            >
            > With the image dropping in the FOV, it would seem that the OTA is rising too
            > fast. (Orion was in the Southeast and we never tracked it across the meridian
            > last evening...but did on Saturday night.) Also, trying to keep things
            > straight with a mirror image, it would seem that tracking in Azimuth is also a
            > bit fast? I do get confused on the east west movement and the mirror image
            > thing so if moving east in the FOV...it is actually moving west???
            >
            > Anyway, any help or insight would be appreciated.
            >
            > For six of the eight months the scope has been almost flawless so what did I
            > do?
            >
            > John
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group mailto lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo!
            > Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • autostaretx
            Drifting during tracking isn t a result of a poor train As for which way down and to the left really is can be partly sorted out by menuing to
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 4, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Drifting during tracking isn't a result of a poor "train"

              As for which way "down and to the left" really is can be partly sorted out by menuing to Utilities/Sleep Scope.

              When you tap ENTER, the scope will *stop* (and the display will go black).

              Watch in the eyepiece... the star is now moving to the "west" (since the scope stopped, but the Earth didn't).

              If you're looking east of the central meridian, an overhead star will be moving "up" as it moves "west".
              If you're looking west of the central meridian, an overhead star will be moving "down" as it moves "west".

              To resume the tracking, tap any other key *except* ENTER.
              (i use the "?" key as one "known safe")

              Hmmm... if you had earlier done a GoTo the Moon (and then merely slewed to M42), that would've kicked the sidereal tracking rate to Lunar... which is 3.5% slower than "real" sidereal...

              Likewise, if you have our patch kit installed with the "remember Custom Tracking Rate" option, you might have inadvertently brought over an oddball rate from your previous session.

              Otherwise, i vote for slight misalignment, unless you had a guiding camera attached to the Autoguider socket... that could have been asserting a continuous "guide" signal.

              good luck
              --dick

              --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "John Hilliard" wrote:
              >
              > We purchased a previously owned 8" LX 90 ACF about eight months ago and have been very satisfied with it. Last month over new moon weekend we noticed some issues with the tracking. We use a Mallincam and would notice that even when the GOTO beeps that it has arrived that there would be still be some slight movement in Alt or Az or sometimes both. Occasionally I would bump the opposite direction arrow key to get it to stop and sometimes we would just wait it out.
              >
              > We would center the object in on the monitor and would sometimes get the same drift, sometimes not. Once we went to a longer integration (exposure) time it might take two or three refreshes before we could get a stable image.
              >
              > The settling down after a GOTO had been occurring for a couple of outings but the tracking issue just started the last night of our last new moon trip. I wrote it off to one of the clutches being a bit too loose and forgot about it.
              >
              > Saturday evening we went to an outreach session at a local park and I went to M-42 and just left it there for the public to observe. Every once in a while I would check to see if the Trapezium was still centered and would bring it back to center. Again not worrying much as people have a tendency to bump the scope and I was just recentering.
              >
              > Last night I set up the scope and centered the Trapezium in an 11mm plossl. I noticed it slowly would drift down and to the left in the FOV. I re-centered a few times and after a half hour it would be halfway to the lower left.
              >
              > This is something new. Typically it would hold for what seemed extended periods of time and the only 'smear' issues we ever had with the Mallincam was on longer integrations and if someone walked by and a vibration was picked up.
              >
              > We do have a counterweight bar on the scope and have it well balanced in Altitude. We work only in Alt/Az. I have been concerned about just how tight to crank the Azimuth clutch lock...not to over tighten but again to secure it. But I have never cranked it as tight as I could turn it by hand.
              >
              > With the image dropping in the FOV, it would seem that the OTA is rising too fast. (Orion was in the Southeast and we never tracked it across the meridian last evening...but did on Saturday night.) Also, trying to keep things straight with a mirror image, it would seem that tracking in Azimuth is also a bit fast? I do get confused on the east west movement and the mirror image thing so if moving east in the FOV...it is actually moving west???
              >
              > Anyway, any help or insight would be appreciated.
              >
              > For six of the eight months the scope has been almost flawless so what did I do?
              >
              > John
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • joe.bonner@rogers.com
              Fernando, I was about to try this tonight and thought I had better ask a clarification question first. My secondary assembly is actually more than just loose -
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 6, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Fernando,

                I was about to try this tonight and thought I had better ask a clarification question first. My secondary assembly is actually more than just loose - it spins in both directions using very little force.

                When you say "With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly...", do you mean the entire secondary assembly (mirror and all), or just the black plastic ring that sits on top of the dark grey ring? Looking at my scope, I don't see how the secondary mirror will fit through the hole in the corrector plate.

                Also, what are the baffle tubes? I don't see any tubes surrounding my secondary mirror. I see the following components to the "assembly", working from the outside in:
                - A black plastic ring that holds the 6 screws,
                - A dark grey ring,
                - A grey gasket,
                - The corrector plate,
                - Another grey gasket,
                - The secondary mirror

                This entire assembly is spinning except for the 2 gaskets and the corrector plate itself.

                Is this the same as your setup? From what I can see, the mirror is too big to fit through the hole in the corrector plate. Am I missing something?

                Thanks,
                Joe



                --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@..." wrote:
                >
                > Thanks so much for that Fernando. It looks like I might be able to fix this
                > myself after all. I just need to work up the courage to take tools to my
                > scope! I hope it's just a miss aligned spring.
                >
                > Thanks again,
                > Joe
                >
                > --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "Fernando" wrote:
                > >
                > > Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob's knobs could be of some help to you:
                > >
                > > http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                > >
                > > With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly, and then check if some of the inner collimation screws is out of place and maybe one of the springs misaligned. With the secondary assembly being removed you can also check the two "baffle tubes" at both sides of the corrector plate, and retighten them if needed (they are screwed one into the other).
                > > Good luck (and be very carefull when manipulating the secondary!)
                > >
                > > Fernando
                > >
                > > --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I am having a huge issue with collimation. I have an 8" LX90 ACF purchased in 2010. I can't figure out if there is a mis-print in my manual, or if my particular model is laid out differently than most Meades with respect to the collimating screws. All I can say for sure is that my secondary is loose and I don't know what screws to tighten to fix it.
                > > >
                > > > I tried to collimate for the first time about 6 months ago when I started some photography. Visually, it never needed an adjustment. So, I read the manual where it clearly had a diagram pointing to the OUTER 3 screws as the ones to use to collimate. So these are the ones I used. I had trouble getting a good result so I brought it in to the shop where I bought it for some coaching. They said no, no, no use the inner 3 screws, not the outer 3. All Meade scopes are like that. So we tightened down the outer 3 and collimated using the inner 3.
                > > >
                > > > That seemed good for a while,but now here I am months later and I can't get a clear focus at all. After trying to collimate using the inner screws again I simply can't get a good result. In fact, the secondary is tilted so badly now that my out of focus star is oval rather than round. I have also noticed that the secondary housing that holds the screws is now loose, even though the outer 3 screws are snug.
                > > >
                > > > Is my manual correct after all? Is it the inner or outer screws that I should use for collimation? How do I fix this without doing any more damage?!
                > > >
                > > > Thanks,
                > > > Joe
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • Fernando Campuzano
                My setup (LX90 8 no-ACF, year 2005) is like the one you can see in figure #2 of the Bob s knobs instructions:
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 7, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  My setup (LX90 8" no-ACF, year 2005) is like the one you can see in figure #2 of the Bob's knobs instructions:
                  http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                  Removing the three outer screws, I can get what you can see in figure #4 of the instructions (the secondary out of the OTA). With this secondary assembly removed, at the OTA I have:
                  - An outer ring, whith the female threads for the three outer screws
                  - The corrector plate
                  - A tube at the other side of the corrector
                  The outer ring and the tube are screwed one into the other through the hole in the corrector plate. Then I can retighten them if needed.
                  Maybe your setup is different....
                  Anyway, hope this helps
                  Regards,
                  Fernando


                  >________________________________
                  >De: "joe.bonner@..." <joe.bonner@...>
                  >Para: lx90@yahoogroups.com
                  >Enviado: Jueves 7 de febrero de 2013 4:55
                  >Asunto: [lx90] Re: Collimating trouble
                  >

                  >Fernando,
                  >
                  >I was about to try this tonight and thought I had better ask a clarification question first. My secondary assembly is actually more than just loose - it spins in both directions using very little force.
                  >
                  >When you say "With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly...", do you mean the entire secondary assembly (mirror and all), or just the black plastic ring that sits on top of the dark grey ring? Looking at my scope, I don't see how the secondary mirror will fit through the hole in the corrector plate.
                  >
                  >Also, what are the baffle tubes? I don't see any tubes surrounding my secondary mirror. I see the following components to the "assembly", working from the outside in:
                  >- A black plastic ring that holds the 6 screws,
                  >- A dark grey ring,
                  >- A grey gasket,
                  >- The corrector plate,
                  >- Another grey gasket,
                  >- The secondary mirror
                  >
                  >This entire assembly is spinning except for the 2 gaskets and the corrector plate itself.
                  >
                  >Is this the same as your setup? From what I can see, the mirror is too big to fit through the hole in the corrector plate. Am I missing something?
                  >
                  >Thanks,
                  >Joe
                  >
                  >--- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@..." wrote:
                  >>
                  >> Thanks so much for that Fernando. It looks like I might be able to fix this
                  >> myself after all. I just need to work up the courage to take tools to my
                  >> scope! I hope it's just a miss aligned spring.
                  >>
                  >> Thanks again,
                  >> Joe
                  >>
                  >> --- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "Fernando" wrote:
                  >> >
                  >> > Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob's knobs could be of some help to you:
                  >> >
                  >> > http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                  >> >
                  >> > With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly, and then check if some of the inner collimation screws is out of place and maybe one of the springs misaligned. With the secondary assembly being removed you can also check the two "baffle tubes" at both sides of the corrector plate, and retighten them if needed (they are screwed one into the other).
                  >> > Good luck (and be very carefull when manipulating the secondary!)
                  >> >
                  >> > Fernando
                  >> >
                  >> > --- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
                  >> > >
                  >> > > I am having a huge issue with collimation. I have an 8" LX90 ACF purchased in 2010. I can't figure out if there is a mis-print in my manual, or if my particular model is laid out differently than most Meades with respect to the collimating screws. All I can say for sure is that my secondary is loose and I don't know what screws to tighten to fix it.
                  >> > >
                  >> > > I tried to collimate for the first time about 6 months ago when I started some photography. Visually, it never needed an adjustment. So, I read the manual where it clearly had a diagram pointing to the OUTER 3 screws as the ones to use to collimate. So these are the ones I used. I had trouble getting a good result so I brought it in to the shop where I bought it for some coaching. They said no, no, no use the inner 3 screws, not the outer 3. All Meade scopes are like that. So we tightened down the outer 3 and collimated using the inner 3.
                  >> > >
                  >> > > That seemed good for a while,but now here I am months later and I can't get a clear focus at all. After trying to collimate using the inner screws again I simply can't get a good result. In fact, the secondary is tilted so badly now that my out of focus star is oval rather than round. I have also noticed that the secondary housing that holds the screws is now loose, even though the outer 3 screws are snug.
                  >> > >
                  >> > > Is my manual correct after all? Is it the inner or outer screws that I should use for collimation? How do I fix this without doing any more damage?!
                  >> > >
                  >> > > Thanks,
                  >> > > Joe
                  >> > >
                  >> >
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • joe.bonner@rogers.com
                  Thanks Fernando, that helps. I ve made some progress! Based on your description, I realized that what I thought was the side of the secondary mirror, was
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 7, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks Fernando, that helps. I've made some progress!

                    Based on your description, I realized that what I thought was the side of the secondary mirror, was actually the side of the baffle tube. The secondary mirror was, of course, inside that tube. So after removing the 3 outer screws, I was able to pull out the secondary mirror and its backing plate. As it turns out, one of the springs had become coil bound and was sticking out a bit. I carefully nudged it back into position. This was likely a factor in making collimation difficult.

                    Now, I am still left with the loose outer ring and tube. How did you go about tightening them? They do appear to screw one into the other, as you said, but I was unable to rotate one without the other following the same rotation. Its awkward to either hold or turn the inside tube. Is there a trick or technique to it? Or maybe I'm missing something fundamental. There are no more screws in your assembly, are there?

                    Thanks,
                    Joe


                    --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, Fernando Campuzano wrote:
                    >
                    > My setup (LX90 8" no-ACF, year 2005) is like the one you can see in figure #2 of the Bob's knobs instructions:
                    > http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                    > Removing the three outer screws, I can get what you can see in figure #4 of the instructions (the secondary out of the OTA). With this secondary assembly removed, at the OTA I have:
                    > - An outer ring, whith the female threads for the three outer screws
                    > - The corrector plate
                    > - A tube at the other side of the corrector
                    > The outer ring and the tube are screwed one into the other through the hole in the corrector plate. Then I can retighten them if needed.
                    > Maybe your setup is different....
                    > Anyway, hope this helps
                    > Regards,
                    > Fernando
                    >
                    >
                    > >________________________________
                    > >De: "joe.bonner@..."
                    > >Para: lx90@yahoogroups.com
                    > >Enviado: Jueves 7 de febrero de 2013 4:55
                    > >Asunto: [lx90] Re: Collimating trouble
                    > >
                    > > 
                    > >Fernando,
                    > >
                    > >I was about to try this tonight and thought I had better ask a clarification question first. My secondary assembly is actually more than just loose - it spins in both directions using very little force.
                    > >
                    > >When you say "With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly...", do you mean the entire secondary assembly (mirror and all), or just the black plastic ring that sits on top of the dark grey ring? Looking at my scope, I don't see how the secondary mirror will fit through the hole in the corrector plate.
                    > >
                    > >Also, what are the baffle tubes? I don't see any tubes surrounding my secondary mirror. I see the following components to the "assembly", working from the outside in:
                    > >- A black plastic ring that holds the 6 screws,
                    > >- A dark grey ring,
                    > >- A grey gasket,
                    > >- The corrector plate,
                    > >- Another grey gasket,
                    > >- The secondary mirror
                    > >
                    > >This entire assembly is spinning except for the 2 gaskets and the corrector plate itself.
                    > >
                    > >Is this the same as your setup? From what I can see, the mirror is too big to fit through the hole in the corrector plate. Am I missing something?
                    > >
                    > >Thanks,
                    > >Joe
                    > >
                    > >--- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >> Thanks so much for that Fernando. It looks like I might be able to fix this
                    > >> myself after all. I just need to work up the courage to take tools to my
                    > >> scope! I hope it's just a miss aligned spring.
                    > >>
                    > >> Thanks again,
                    > >> Joe
                    > >>
                    > >> --- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "Fernando" wrote:
                    > >> >
                    > >> > Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob's knobs could be of some help to you:
                    > >> >
                    > >> > http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                    > >> >
                    > >> > With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly, and then check if some of the inner collimation screws is out of place and maybe one of the springs misaligned. With the secondary assembly being removed you can also check the two "baffle tubes" at both sides of the corrector plate, and retighten them if needed (they are screwed one into the other).
                    > >> > Good luck (and be very carefull when manipulating the secondary!)
                    > >> >
                    > >> > Fernando
                    > >> >
                    > >> > --- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
                    > >> > >
                    > >> > > I am having a huge issue with collimation. I have an 8" LX90 ACF purchased in 2010. I can't figure out if there is a mis-print in my manual, or if my particular model is laid out differently than most Meades with respect to the collimating screws. All I can say for sure is that my secondary is loose and I don't know what screws to tighten to fix it.
                    > >> > >
                    > >> > > I tried to collimate for the first time about 6 months ago when I started some photography. Visually, it never needed an adjustment. So, I read the manual where it clearly had a diagram pointing to the OUTER 3 screws as the ones to use to collimate. So these are the ones I used. I had trouble getting a good result so I brought it in to the shop where I bought it for some coaching. They said no, no, no use the inner 3 screws, not the outer 3. All Meade scopes are like that. So we tightened down the outer 3 and collimated using the inner 3.
                    > >> > >
                    > >> > > That seemed good for a while,but now here I am months later and I can't get a clear focus at all. After trying to collimate using the inner screws again I simply can't get a good result. In fact, the secondary is tilted so badly now that my out of focus star is oval rather than round. I have also noticed that the secondary housing that holds the screws is now loose, even though the outer 3 screws are snug.
                    > >> > >
                    > >> > > Is my manual correct after all? Is it the inner or outer screws that I should use for collimation? How do I fix this without doing any more damage?!
                    > >> > >
                    > >> > > Thanks,
                    > >> > > Joe
                    > >> > >
                    > >> >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Fernando Campuzano
                    No, there are no more screws. Just a matter of small or big hands... :-) Try to turn the inside tube with your fingers working as a forceps, and with the
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 7, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      No, there are no more screws. Just a matter of small or big hands... :-)
                      Try to turn the inside tube with your fingers working as a forceps, and with the other hand hold the outer ring.


                      >________________________________
                      >De: "joe.bonner@..." <joe.bonner@...>
                      >Para: lx90@yahoogroups.com
                      >Enviado: Viernes 8 de febrero de 2013 4:45
                      >Asunto: [lx90] Re: Collimating trouble
                      >

                      >Thanks Fernando, that helps. I've made some progress!
                      >
                      >Based on your description, I realized that what I thought was the side of the secondary mirror, was actually the side of the baffle tube. The secondary mirror was, of course, inside that tube. So after removing the 3 outer screws, I was able to pull out the secondary mirror and its backing plate. As it turns out, one of the springs had become coil bound and was sticking out a bit. I carefully nudged it back into position. This was likely a factor in making collimation difficult.
                      >
                      >Now, I am still left with the loose outer ring and tube. How did you go about tightening them? They do appear to screw one into the other, as you said, but I was unable to rotate one without the other following the same rotation. Its awkward to either hold or turn the inside tube. Is there a trick or technique to it? Or maybe I'm missing something fundamental. There are no more screws in your assembly, are there?
                      >
                      >Thanks,
                      >Joe
                      >
                      >--- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, Fernando Campuzano wrote:
                      >>
                      >> My setup (LX90 8" no-ACF, year 2005) is like the one you can see in figure #2 of the Bob's knobs instructions:
                      >> http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                      >> Removing the three outer screws, I can get what you can see in figure #4 of the instructions (the secondary out of the OTA). With this secondary assembly removed, at the OTA I have:
                      >> - An outer ring, whith the female threads for the three outer screws
                      >> - The corrector plate
                      >> - A tube at the other side of the corrector
                      >> The outer ring and the tube are screwed one into the other through the hole in the corrector plate. Then I can retighten them if needed.
                      >> Maybe your setup is different....
                      >> Anyway, hope this helps
                      >> Regards,
                      >> Fernando
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> >________________________________
                      >> >De: "joe.bonner@..."
                      >> >Para: mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com
                      >> >Enviado: Jueves 7 de febrero de 2013 4:55
                      >> >Asunto: [lx90] Re: Collimating trouble
                      >> >
                      >> > 
                      >> >Fernando,
                      >> >
                      >> >I was about to try this tonight and thought I had better ask a clarification question first. My secondary assembly is actually more than just loose - it spins in both directions using very little force.
                      >> >
                      >> >When you say "With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly...", do you mean the entire secondary assembly (mirror and all), or just the black plastic ring that sits on top of the dark grey ring? Looking at my scope, I don't see how the secondary mirror will fit through the hole in the corrector plate.
                      >> >
                      >> >Also, what are the baffle tubes? I don't see any tubes surrounding my secondary mirror. I see the following components to the "assembly", working from the outside in:
                      >> >- A black plastic ring that holds the 6 screws,
                      >> >- A dark grey ring,
                      >> >- A grey gasket,
                      >> >- The corrector plate,
                      >> >- Another grey gasket,
                      >> >- The secondary mirror
                      >> >
                      >> >This entire assembly is spinning except for the 2 gaskets and the corrector plate itself.
                      >> >
                      >> >Is this the same as your setup? From what I can see, the mirror is too big to fit through the hole in the corrector plate. Am I missing something?
                      >> >
                      >> >Thanks,
                      >> >Joe
                      >> >
                      >> >--- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Thanks so much for that Fernando. It looks like I might be able to fix this
                      >> >> myself after all. I just need to work up the courage to take tools to my
                      >> >> scope! I hope it's just a miss aligned spring.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Thanks again,
                      >> >> Joe
                      >> >>
                      >> >> --- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "Fernando" wrote:
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > Hello Joe. Maybe the instructions for the Bob's knobs could be of some help to you:
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > http://www.bobsknobs.com/Literature/assets/M6screwinfo2.pdf
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > With the outer screws you can remove the secondary assembly, and then check if some of the inner collimation screws is out of place and maybe one of the springs misaligned. With the secondary assembly being removed you can also check the two "baffle tubes" at both sides of the corrector plate, and retighten them if needed (they are screwed one into the other).
                      >> >> > Good luck (and be very carefull when manipulating the secondary!)
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > Fernando
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > --- In mailto:lx90%40yahoogroups.com, "joe.bonner@" wrote:
                      >> >> > >
                      >> >> > > I am having a huge issue with collimation. I have an 8" LX90 ACF purchased in 2010. I can't figure out if there is a mis-print in my manual, or if my particular model is laid out differently than most Meades with respect to the collimating screws. All I can say for sure is that my secondary is loose and I don't know what screws to tighten to fix it.
                      >> >> > >
                      >> >> > > I tried to collimate for the first time about 6 months ago when I started some photography. Visually, it never needed an adjustment. So, I read the manual where it clearly had a diagram pointing to the OUTER 3 screws as the ones to use to collimate. So these are the ones I used. I had trouble getting a good result so I brought it in to the shop where I bought it for some coaching. They said no, no, no use the inner 3 screws, not the outer 3. All Meade scopes are like that. So we tightened down the outer 3 and collimated using the inner 3.
                      >> >> > >
                      >> >> > > That seemed good for a while,but now here I am months later and I can't get a clear focus at all. After trying to collimate using the inner screws again I simply can't get a good result. In fact, the secondary is tilted so badly now that my out of focus star is oval rather than round. I have also noticed that the secondary housing that holds the screws is now loose, even though the outer 3 screws are snug.
                      >> >> > >
                      >> >> > > Is my manual correct after all? Is it the inner or outer screws that I should use for collimation? How do I fix this without doing any more damage?!
                      >> >> > >
                      >> >> > > Thanks,
                      >> >> > > Joe
                      >> >> > >
                      >> >> >
                      >> >>
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >>
                      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >>
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.