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  • Henrik VAN HOLTHOON
    Hi Niall, I was looking at your photos concerning Mars, how did you do it as you are always complaining about bad weather and not so good seeing these pictures
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 1, 2008
      Hi Niall,
      I was looking at your photos concerning Mars, how did you do it as you are always complaining about bad weather and not so good seeing these pictures are rather good. I tried myself just looking at Mars end of November and I got only an orange disk no details what so ever. I can not remember the size of your scope I have an LX90GPS 8”. You must have stolen the photos somewhere before you getting angry I am just kidding.
      We had a lot of turbulence in France apparently you had very little.
      I will try again in February as I am not close to my scope on the moment unfortunately Mars will be by then a lot farther away, enfin such is live.
      Regards Henrik

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Niall Saunders
      Hi Henrik, No - NEITHER of those pictures are mine !!!! One is by Ed Roach (on the left), the other is from Hubble (on the right), taken a few days earlier. I
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 1, 2008
        Hi Henrik,

        No - NEITHER of those pictures are mine !!!!

        One is by Ed Roach (on the left), the other is from Hubble (on the
        right), taken a few days earlier.

        I put them up, side by side, just to show how good Ed Roach's
        pictures really are.

        I have had no luck this winter season - every time I get the
        observatory open, the clouds roll in - or, if they don't, it was
        because they were already there in the first place, masquerading as
        a transparent layer of water up above us.

        Instead, I am going to upload my best Mars image from last time
        round - just to remind me how things 'could have been' if the
        weather had cooperated.

        My image is at "1:1", as it came out of the DSI (original, colour) -
        the one on the right is Ed's and has had to be reduced by a factor
        of 3 to get the image sizes to compare). Click the link below :-
        <http://tech.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/lx90/photos/view/8c79?b=3>

        Cheers,
        Niall Saunders
        Clinterty Observatories
        Aberdeen, SCOTLAND

        --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, Henrik VAN HOLTHOON
        <henrik.van.holthoon@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Niall,
        > I was looking at your photos concerning Mars, how did you do it as
        you are always complaining about bad weather and not so good seeing
        these pictures are rather good. I tried myself just looking at Mars
        end of November and I got only an orange disk no details what so
        ever. I can not remember the size of your scope I have an LX90GPS
        8”. You must have stolen the photos somewhere before you getting
        angry I am just kidding.
        > We had a lot of turbulence in France apparently you had very
        little.
        > I will try again in February as I am not close to my scope on the
        moment unfortunately Mars will be by then a lot farther away, enfin
        such is live.
        > Regards Henrik
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Edward Roach
        Hi Henrik, That was my image. I use an 8 LX90 also.The seeing conditions were average, but the high frame rate of the Imaging Source cameras and no video
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 1, 2008
          Hi Henrik,

          That was my image. I use an 8" LX90 also.The seeing conditions were average, but the high frame rate of the Imaging Source cameras and no video compression, really helps to capture those fleeting moments when the seeing steadies slightly.

          You can see in these examples of what can be achieved in very good and excellent seeing conditions with the 8" LX90 and a DMK camera. Here is an image of Saturn I took in March of 2006 under very good conditions, about 7/10 on the Pickering scale.

          http://tinyurl.com/rp4sx

          Here is a lunar image of the craters Maurolycus, Stofler and Heraclitus. This was taken under excellent conditions around 8-9/10 on the Pickering scale, the best seeing I have ever had in 4 years of imaging!

          http://tinyurl.com/34vqdc

          Hopefully your seeing conditions improve soon because it is quite a sight to see these visually and on the computer screen under great conditions.

          Regards,
          Ed Roach





          Henrik VAN HOLTHOON <henrik.van.holthoon@...> wrote:
          Hi Niall,
          I was looking at your photos concerning Mars, how did you do it as you are always complaining about bad weather and not so good seeing these pictures are rather good. I tried myself just looking at Mars end of November and I got only an orange disk no details what so ever. I can not remember the size of your scope I have an LX90GPS 8”. You must have stolen the photos somewhere before you getting angry I am just kidding.
          We had a lot of turbulence in France apparently you had very little.
          I will try again in February as I am not close to my scope on the moment unfortunately Mars will be by then a lot farther away, enfin such is live.
          Regards Henrik

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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