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Re: [lx90] Mars

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  • Clay Sherrod
    Monte- sounds like your perserverence paid off. Glad you had a good night with Mars. It truly is a wonderful sight right now.....take it all in and enjoy
    Message 1 of 30 , Jun 1, 2001
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      Monte- sounds like your perserverence paid off. Glad you had a good night
      with Mars. It truly is a wonderful sight right now.....take it all in and
      enjoy it; it will be another 17 years before it is at least this good!

      You are correct with the polar caps and that is "what" you were seeing
      before: ice caps. As Mars approaches the sun in its highly elliptical
      orbit, it is much more prone (for many reasons) to "losing" its ice caps
      more readily than is Earth; rarely does the SPC completely dissipate, but
      nearly always does the northern cap when closest to the sun (and hence, very
      close to Earth). As these caps melt or dissipate, you will see
      strengthening of the darker shades as they intensify from the increase in
      Martian water vapor; the darker areas you are seeing now are likely
      different ones than you observed previously, but also are likely darker than
      when Mars still had most of its ambient moisture locked up in ground frost
      and polar cap ice.

      Keep looking! Mars is NOT a static world; every hour shows a different face
      as Dick Seymour has pointed out.....and every day brings some change which
      we can observe with our scopes here on Earth.

      And keep up that great enthusiasm....isn't that why we're all into
      astronomy??

      Dr. Clay

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Monte L. Caudill <monte33417@...>
      To: lx90@yahoogroups.com <lx90@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Thursday, May 31, 2001 11:37 PM
      Subject: [lx90] Mars


      >Hi all,
      >
      >Finally got to use my scope again last night. It's been real
      >cloudy here for a while. Last night was again solid overcast.
      >I checked the skies one last time at 1:30am, still solid
      >overcast so I gave up and was watching TV. Looked out my
      >bedroom window at 2:00am and thought I saw Mars so I went
      >outside. Unbelievable!! The sky was crystal clear. Out went
      >me and the scope (Quickly). When I fired up the Autostar, the
      >last date was the 20th. And as I remember that was a very short
      >viewing session due to clouds. So, It's been awhile since I've
      >looked at Mars. Seeing was real good and good sharp focus seemed
      >easier than normal. Mars looked like a totally different planet
      >than what I'd been seeing. The only thing that looked familiar
      >to me was the color. No large white areas as before but a lot of
      >darker areas and details.
      >
      >Before, (Using star diagonal, so left/right reversed but up/down
      >correct) I could always see at the bottom left, a large white
      >area and a smaller one towards the top. Also not a lot of contrast
      >between the lighter orange areas and the darker regions of the
      >planet.
      >
      >This time (Using diagonal also) there was neither a large white
      >area at the bottom left nor the smaller one towards the top. There
      >was kind of a circular darker spot towards the top left. And two
      >large dark areas which started about 1/4 width from the left edge,
      >angled down slightly all the way across to the right edge, covered
      >most of the width of the planet, both at the top and bottom with
      >only a thinner strip of bright orange separating the two. The
      >contrast between the light and dark areas was also much better.
      >
      >Please don't laugh at my ignorance, but:
      >
      >I thought that the white areas were ice caps. Are they? And the
      >planet has rotated a lot? What I mean is, at roughly the same times
      >as I've been viewing Mars, its now showing a different face???
      >
      >Or were these "ice caps" just clouds and now dissipated? Hope
      >not, or I'll feel real dumb.
      >
      >PS Sorry to be so long winded (With most of my posts). It's just
      >that I have no one here who shares my enthusiasm for Astronomy. No
      >one who wants to here too much about my excitement of what I've
      >just seen etc. If my posting of my excitement(s) (long windedness)
      >is out of line, please tell me to knock it off.
      >
      >Thanks
      >Monte
      >
      >
      >
      >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      >lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • sc02492@yahoo.com
      Yes, it s really exciting to see such detail on a planet that s usually difficult to view. A red filter brings out lots of surface features as well. You
      Message 2 of 30 , Jun 1, 2001
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        Yes, it's really exciting to see such detail on a planet that's
        usually difficult to view. A red filter brings out lots of
        surface features as well. You should check out the Mars Previewer II
        on the www.skypub.com website. This is a program that shows you the
        correct orientation of Mars at any given date/time. I bet you will
        have fun comparing what you see in your scope with the Mars Previewer
        image. I also provided some websites for good Martian maps a while
        ago. It's in the archives somewhere. Keep up the enthusiasm!

        Steve




        -
      • Larry Carlson
        I am sorry to bother everyone with what is mundane info, but I am a new owner of an LX90 and I just saw Mars for the 1st time in my life last night. I cannot
        Message 3 of 30 , Jun 20, 2001
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          I am sorry to bother everyone with what is mundane info, but I am
          a new owner of an LX90 and I just saw Mars for the 1st time in
          my life last night. I cannot describe it and I will be there tonight
          and every night the sky will allow. I have not been this excited
          since......well, never mind.
        • ian
          Hi Larry, When I saw Saturn for the first time 18 months ago with my Nexstar 5 I went *WOW* Even though incredible photographs have been around for years
          Message 4 of 30 , Jun 20, 2001
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            Hi Larry,

            When I saw Saturn for the first time 18 months ago with my Nexstar 5
            I went *WOW* Even though incredible photographs have been around for
            years there's nothing like seeing something yourself for the first time.

            Welcome to the *WOW* club.

            Ian (in London)

            At [Wed, 20 Jun 2001 20:12:34 -0000]
            "Larry Carlson" <greyhounds@...> wrote:

            I am sorry to bother everyone with what is mundane info, but I am
            a new owner of an LX90 and I just saw Mars for the 1st time in
            my life last night. I cannot describe it and I will be there tonight
            and every night the sky will allow. I have not been this excited
            since......well, never mind.


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          • reim58@yahoo.com
            I said the same thing (WOW) when I took out my LX90 and sat it next to my Nexstar5. ... for ... time. ... tonight ... http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            Message 5 of 30 , Jun 20, 2001
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              I said the same thing (WOW) when I took out my LX90 and sat it next
              to my Nexstar5.

              --- In lx90@y..., ian <ian@n...> wrote:
              > Hi Larry,
              >
              > When I saw Saturn for the first time 18 months ago with my Nexstar 5
              > I went *WOW* Even though incredible photographs have been around
              for
              > years there's nothing like seeing something yourself for the first
              time.
              >
              > Welcome to the *WOW* club.
              >
              > Ian (in London)
              >
              > At [Wed, 20 Jun 2001 20:12:34 -0000]
              > "Larry Carlson" <greyhounds@w...> wrote:
              >
              > I am sorry to bother everyone with what is mundane info, but I am
              > a new owner of an LX90 and I just saw Mars for the 1st time in
              > my life last night. I cannot describe it and I will be there
              tonight
              > and every night the sky will allow. I have not been this excited
              > since......well, never mind.
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > lx90-unsubscribe@y...
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • bgash2@home.com
              That is a great club name Ian. I got my LX 90 just in time to see Jupiter for the first time in my life. *WOW* It was a moving experience. But I have to say
              Message 6 of 30 , Jun 20, 2001
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                That is a great club name Ian. I got my LX 90 just in time to see
                Jupiter for the first time in my life. *WOW* It was a moving
                experience. But I have to say that the first time I saw M13 and the
                Ring Nebula in the same night was too much. I am looking foward to
                seeing Orion but in the mean time, I will settle for Sagitarrius (
                spelling correct?)
                Bill

                --- In lx90@y..., ian <ian@n...> wrote:
                > Hi Larry,
                >
                > When I saw Saturn for the first time 18 months ago with my Nexstar 5
                > I went *WOW* Even though incredible photographs have been around
                for
                > years there's nothing like seeing something yourself for the first
                time.
                >
                > Welcome to the *WOW* club.
                >
                > Ian (in London)
                >
                > At [Wed, 20 Jun 2001 20:12:34 -0000]
                > "Larry Carlson" <greyhounds@w...> wrote:
                >
                > I am sorry to bother everyone with what is mundane info, but I am
                > a new owner of an LX90 and I just saw Mars for the 1st time in
                > my life last night. I cannot describe it and I will be there
                tonight
                > and every night the sky will allow. I have not been this excited
                > since......well, never mind.
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > lx90-unsubscribe@y...
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • lindahicks@earthlink.net
                I haven t had a scope out this week (humidity, clouds, tired, etc) but Mars appears to be a little more ruddy to the naked eye. Are the dust storms
                Message 7 of 30 , Aug 9, 2001
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                  I haven't had a scope out this week (humidity, clouds, tired, etc)
                  but Mars appears to be a little more ruddy to the naked eye. Are the
                  dust storms disapating?

                  Clay,
                  Theories on climate (temp, H2O content, etc) these dust storms are
                  having on Mars?

                  Ken Hicks
                • Clay Sherrod
                  Hello Ken - dust storms are subsiding a bit, but not enough to cause a visual reddening; this is cause by an interesting Earth-related phenomenon that I call
                  Message 8 of 30 , Aug 9, 2001
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                    Hello Ken - dust storms are subsiding a bit, but not enough to cause a
                    visual reddening; this is cause by an interesting Earth-related phenomenon
                    that I call "pre-midnight extinction" and it is a curious fact that is
                    increasing all the time due to manmade pollutants.

                    Mars has moved into the evening sky which has a considerably greater
                    tendency to be filled with early-evening pollution which clears out and
                    settles during the cooling progression of nighttime; hence in the morning
                    sky the air is somewhat clearer of the reddening substances and Mars will
                    appear more true to color (yellow-orange); this is much like looking at the
                    moon reddened as it sets through the thick atmospheric blanket.

                    Thus, the reddening you are witnessing is a "man-made" (and sometimes water
                    vapor will do the same thing!) illusion.

                    HOWEVER...all that being said, the dust storms on Mars are commonly kicked
                    up by solar heating just after opposition at each very close apparition
                    (1956, 1971, 1983 and this one). After the sun's miniscual heat has
                    sublimated all the horefrost from within the surface soils, there is little
                    to hold the smallest dust particles to the ground; great winds will form
                    just at Mars' closest solar approach (perihelion) and subsequently will pick
                    up the newly-freed dust and circulate it widely. In many years the planet
                    can be completely obscured by the dust; using a BLUE filter sometimes can
                    penetrate thinner layers of this, a phenomenon known as "the blue clearing."

                    Hope I answered the question!

                    Dr. Clay
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: lindahicks@... <lindahicks@...>
                    To: lx90@yahoogroups.com <lx90@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Thursday, August 09, 2001 10:40 AM
                    Subject: [lx90] Mars


                    >I haven't had a scope out this week (humidity, clouds, tired, etc)
                    >but Mars appears to be a little more ruddy to the naked eye. Are the
                    >dust storms disapating?
                    >
                    >Clay,
                    >Theories on climate (temp, H2O content, etc) these dust storms are
                    >having on Mars?
                    >
                    >Ken Hicks
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    >lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >To view the LX90 FAQ, visit: www.ibida.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                  • TrumpetPA@aol.com
                    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/releases/2001/release_2001_199.html No wonder my mars pics were awful! Mark
                    Message 9 of 30 , Oct 12, 2001
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                      http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/releases/2001/release_2001_199.html

                      No wonder my mars pics were awful!

                      Mark
                    • Roberts, Terry
                      I need some help please. In July I will be moving to Honolulu. (21-19N/157-52W) What I would like to know is how much this will change the observing of Mars
                      Message 10 of 30 , May 2, 2003
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                        I need some help please.

                        In July I will be moving to Honolulu. (21-19N/157-52W)

                        What I would like to know is how much this will change the observing of Mars
                        this year.
                        I am guessing that it will place Mars higher in the sky. Or am I all wet?

                        Thanks ahead of time -
                        Terry
                        32-42N/116-59W (for now)
                      • J.D. Metzger
                        Yes, it will be higher in the sky. Since Honolulu is about 11.5 degrees south of your present latitude, Mars will be about 11.5 degrees higher in the sky at
                        Message 11 of 30 , May 2, 2003
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                          Yes, it will be higher in the sky. Since Honolulu is about 11.5
                          degrees south of your present latitude, Mars will be about 11.5
                          degrees higher in the sky at it's highest point...

                          Clear skies,
                          J.D.


                          --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "Roberts, Terry" <robertst@f...> wrote:
                          > I need some help please.
                          >
                          > In July I will be moving to Honolulu. (21-19N/157-52W)
                          >
                          > What I would like to know is how much this will change the observing
                          of Mars
                          > this year.
                          > I am guessing that it will place Mars higher in the sky. Or am I all
                          wet?
                          >
                          > Thanks ahead of time -
                          > Terry
                          > 32-42N/116-59W (for now)
                        • W4wmmAstronomy@aol.com
                          In a message dated 5/2/2003 4:37:58 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Terry, Also check out:
                          Message 12 of 30 , May 2, 2003
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                            In a message dated 5/2/2003 4:37:58 PM Central Daylight Time,
                            jdmetzg@... writes:

                            > Yes, it will be higher in the sky. Since Honolulu is about 11.5
                            > degrees south of your present latitude, Mars will be about 11.5
                            > degrees higher in the sky at it's highest point...
                            >
                            > Clear skies,
                            > J.D.

                            Terry,

                            Also check out:
                            <A HREF="http://skyandtelescope.com/resources/software/article_328_1.asp">http://skyandtelescope.com/resources/software/article_328_1.asp</A>
                            and the Mars Profiler at
                            <A HREF="http://skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/planets/article_929_3.asp#">http://skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/planets/article_929_3.asp#</A>


                            Looking up,
                            Alan
                            30* 40' 05.7" N
                            88* 15' 46.7" W


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Peter Vasey
                            Hi, Terry, Altitude at culmination on 27/28 August will be almost 53 degrees in Honolulu. Lucky man - you ll get a fine view. Only 19 degrees for me:-( As
                            Message 13 of 30 , May 3, 2003
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                              Hi, Terry,

                              Altitude at culmination on 27/28 August will be almost 53 degrees in Honolulu. Lucky man - you'll get a fine view.
                              Only 19 degrees for me:-( As J.D. Metzger said, you will see it about 11.5 degrees higher than at your present
                              location.

                              Get the free download of Skymap. Really useful for this sort of information! http://www.skymap.com/

                              Clear skies, Peter.

                              "Roberts, Terry" wrote:

                              > I need some help please.
                              >
                              > In July I will be moving to Honolulu. (21-19N/157-52W)
                              >
                              > What I would like to know is how much this will change the observing of Mars
                              > this year.
                              > I am guessing that it will place Mars higher in the sky. Or am I all wet?
                              >
                              > Thanks ahead of time -
                              > Terry
                              > 32-42N/116-59W (for now)
                            • McGinley
                              Hi all, in revisiting a previous discussion about Mars, below is an excerpt from an email newsletter that is put out by my local Planetarium, the Chabot Space
                              Message 14 of 30 , Aug 15, 2005
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                                Hi all, in revisiting a previous discussion about Mars, below is an excerpt
                                from an email newsletter that is put out by my local Planetarium, the Chabot
                                Space and Science Center, Oakland, CA.

                                Watch the skies,
                                Byron

                                Mars Approach

                                Contrary to what you may be hearing, the second closest approach of Mars to
                                Earth in 60,000 years will occur on October 29, not this August. (The
                                closest approach was two years ago when Mars was 34 million miles away.)
                                This year the Red Planet will be 43 million miles away, appear much higher
                                in the sky, much more visible, and just in time for trick-or-treating! Save
                                the date for our Mars Mania Costume Party on the evening of October 29.
                              • Kevin Muenzler
                                ...Yes but it WON T be the size of the full moon! I don t know how many emails I have received reminding me that this is going to happen... Kevin Muenzler,
                                Message 15 of 30 , Aug 15, 2005
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                                  ...Yes but it WON'T be the size of the full moon! I don't know how many
                                  emails I have received reminding me that this is going to happen...

                                  Kevin Muenzler, WB5RUE
                                  29º14'52"N 98º14'50"W
                                  Eagle Creek Observatory
                                  http://www.eaglecreekobservatory.org
                                  Please grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change and the
                                  courage to change the things I cannot accept.

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: lx90@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lx90@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                  McGinley
                                  Sent: Monday, August 15, 2005 5:06 PM
                                  To: LX90
                                  Subject: [lx90] Mars


                                  Hi all, in revisiting a previous discussion about Mars, below is an excerpt
                                  from an email newsletter that is put out by my local Planetarium, the Chabot
                                  Space and Science Center, Oakland, CA.

                                  Watch the skies,
                                  Byron

                                  Mars Approach

                                  Contrary to what you may be hearing, the second closest approach of Mars to
                                  Earth in 60,000 years will occur on October 29, not this August. (The
                                  closest approach was two years ago when Mars was 34 million miles away.)
                                  This year the Red Planet will be 43 million miles away, appear much higher
                                  in the sky, much more visible, and just in time for trick-or-treating! Save
                                  the date for our Mars Mania Costume Party on the evening of October 29.





                                  LX90 Online FAQ, visit: http://faq.lx-90.com To unsubscribe from this group
                                  mailto lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                                • Kevin Muenzler
                                  ...Yes but it WON T be the size of the full moon! I don t know how many emails I have received reminding me that this is going to happen... Kevin Muenzler,
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Aug 15, 2005
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                                    ...Yes but it WON'T be the size of the full moon! I don't know how many
                                    emails I have received reminding me that this is going to happen...

                                    Kevin Muenzler, WB5RUE
                                    29º14'52"N 98º14'50"W
                                    Eagle Creek Observatory
                                    http://www.eaglecreekobservatory.org
                                    Please grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change and the
                                    courage to change the things I cannot accept.

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: lx90@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lx90@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                    McGinley
                                    Sent: Monday, August 15, 2005 5:06 PM
                                    To: LX90
                                    Subject: [lx90] Mars


                                    Hi all, in revisiting a previous discussion about Mars, below is an excerpt
                                    from an email newsletter that is put out by my local Planetarium, the Chabot
                                    Space and Science Center, Oakland, CA.

                                    Watch the skies,
                                    Byron

                                    Mars Approach

                                    Contrary to what you may be hearing, the second closest approach of Mars to
                                    Earth in 60,000 years will occur on October 29, not this August. (The
                                    closest approach was two years ago when Mars was 34 million miles away.)
                                    This year the Red Planet will be 43 million miles away, appear much higher
                                    in the sky, much more visible, and just in time for trick-or-treating! Save
                                    the date for our Mars Mania Costume Party on the evening of October 29.





                                    LX90 Online FAQ, visit: http://faq.lx-90.com To unsubscribe from this group
                                    mailto lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  • McGinley
                                    I hope not, if Mars gets close enough to be the size of a full moon we will all be in a heap of trouble. ... From: lx90@yahoogroups.com
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Aug 15, 2005
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                                      I hope not, if Mars gets close enough to be the size of a full moon we will
                                      all be in a heap of trouble.
                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: lx90@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lx90@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Kevin
                                      Muenzler
                                      Sent: Monday, August 15, 2005 8:06 PM
                                      To: lx90@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: RE: [lx90] Mars


                                      ...Yes but it WON'T be the size of the full moon! I don't know how many
                                      emails I have received reminding me that this is going to happen...

                                      Kevin Muenzler, WB5RUE
                                      29º14'52"N 98º14'50"W
                                      Eagle Creek Observatory
                                      http://www.eaglecreekobservatory.org
                                      Please grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change and the
                                      courage to change the things I cannot accept.

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: lx90@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lx90@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                      McGinley
                                      Sent: Monday, August 15, 2005 5:06 PM
                                      To: LX90
                                      Subject: [lx90] Mars


                                      Hi all, in revisiting a previous discussion about Mars, below is an
                                      excerpt
                                      from an email newsletter that is put out by my local Planetarium, the
                                      Chabot
                                      Space and Science Center, Oakland, CA.

                                      Watch the skies,
                                      Byron

                                      Mars Approach

                                      Contrary to what you may be hearing, the second closest approach of Mars
                                      to
                                      Earth in 60,000 years will occur on October 29, not this August. (The
                                      closest approach was two years ago when Mars was 34 million miles away.)
                                      This year the Red Planet will be 43 million miles away, appear much higher
                                      in the sky, much more visible, and just in time for trick-or-treating!
                                      Save
                                      the date for our Mars Mania Costume Party on the evening of October 29.





                                      LX90 Online FAQ, visit: http://faq.lx-90.com To unsubscribe from this
                                      group
                                      mailto lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                                    • kimlx90
                                      Hello, I m a new LX 90 owner and new to telescopic astronomy. I would like to get a look at Mars before it gets too far away. I only have a couple of eyepieces
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Dec 9, 2005
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                                        Hello,

                                        I'm a new LX 90 owner and new to telescopic astronomy. I would like to
                                        get a look at Mars before it gets too far away. I only have a couple
                                        of eyepieces at the moment, the 28 that came with the scope and a 14mm
                                        5000 series. If I splash out on a barlow is it likley I would be able
                                        to see any surface features or is that only possible with photographic
                                        methods?

                                        Has anybody got any suggestions to what I should buy?

                                        Thanks

                                        Kim
                                      • Terry Belia
                                        Hello Kim and welcome to the group. I rarely can see any details of Mars without photographic help. The naked eye doesn t allow me to see much even with
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Dec 9, 2005
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                                          Hello Kim and welcome to the group. I rarely can see any details of
                                          Mars without photographic help. The naked eye doesn't allow me to see
                                          much even with eyepiece filters.

                                          My LX90 was the newer LNT variety so it came with Meade's LPI imager.
                                          It works quite well for planetary imaging although there are also
                                          members who like the Toucam (840k)web camera. Both can be purchased at
                                          a number of places.

                                          I have also had pretty good success by imaging through my Digital
                                          camera's using T-ring adapters that mate the eyepiece to the camera. I
                                          purchased the adapters at Scopetronics.com and they are quite affordable.

                                          Of course, there are plenty of other imaging options including Meade's
                                          DSI (Deep Space Imager) and Orion's new cooled imager
                                          (oriontelescope.com). The sky (and your wallet) is the limit, literally.

                                          I'm sure other members will provide you with more good information
                                          about imaging and viewing options. Have fun and clear skies.

                                          Terry



                                          --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "kimlx90" <kimlx90@y...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Hello,
                                          >
                                          > I'm a new LX 90 owner and new to telescopic astronomy. I would like to
                                          > get a look at Mars before it gets too far away. I only have a couple
                                          > of eyepieces at the moment, the 28 that came with the scope and a 14mm
                                          > 5000 series. If I splash out on a barlow is it likley I would be able
                                          > to see any surface features or is that only possible with photographic
                                          > methods?
                                          >
                                          > Has anybody got any suggestions to what I should buy?
                                          >
                                          > Thanks
                                          >
                                          > Kim
                                          >
                                        • jonpugh114
                                          Hello Kim, I agree with Terry, an LPI or a webcam is the best way of viewing surface detail on Mars. I ve actually got an LPI which is surplus to
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Dec 9, 2005
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                                            Hello Kim,

                                            I agree with Terry, an LPI or a webcam is the best way of viewing
                                            surface detail on Mars. I've actually got an LPI which is surplus
                                            to requirements, that I'd be willing to sell to you if you're UK
                                            based. Please email me if you're interested.

                                            Thanks

                                            Jon








                                            --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "Terry Belia" <tbdallas@y...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Hello Kim and welcome to the group. I rarely can see any details
                                            of
                                            > Mars without photographic help. The naked eye doesn't allow me to
                                            see
                                            > much even with eyepiece filters.
                                            >
                                            > My LX90 was the newer LNT variety so it came with Meade's LPI
                                            imager.
                                            > It works quite well for planetary imaging although there are also
                                            > members who like the Toucam (840k)web camera. Both can be
                                            purchased at
                                            > a number of places.
                                            >
                                            > I have also had pretty good success by imaging through my Digital
                                            > camera's using T-ring adapters that mate the eyepiece to the
                                            camera. I
                                            > purchased the adapters at Scopetronics.com and they are quite
                                            affordable.
                                            >
                                            > Of course, there are plenty of other imaging options including
                                            Meade's
                                            > DSI (Deep Space Imager) and Orion's new cooled imager
                                            > (oriontelescope.com). The sky (and your wallet) is the limit,
                                            literally.
                                            >
                                            > I'm sure other members will provide you with more good information
                                            > about imaging and viewing options. Have fun and clear skies.
                                            >
                                            > Terry
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "kimlx90" <kimlx90@y...> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > Hello,
                                            > >
                                            > > I'm a new LX 90 owner and new to telescopic astronomy. I would
                                            like to
                                            > > get a look at Mars before it gets too far away. I only have a
                                            couple
                                            > > of eyepieces at the moment, the 28 that came with the scope and
                                            a 14mm
                                            > > 5000 series. If I splash out on a barlow is it likley I would be
                                            able
                                            > > to see any surface features or is that only possible with
                                            photographic
                                            > > methods?
                                            > >
                                            > > Has anybody got any suggestions to what I should buy?
                                            > >
                                            > > Thanks
                                            > >
                                            > > Kim
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • corky23394
                                            I am growing seriously tired of all the expectations delivered to me through various media. Truth is, I own a 12 scope, and visually I can see absolutely no
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Dec 21, 2007
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                                              I am growing seriously tired of all the expectations delivered to me
                                              through various media. Truth is, I own a 12" scope, and visually I can
                                              see absolutely no detail on Mars whatsoever! I have taken expert advice
                                              but to no avail. Are we all kidding ourselves? What can you old timers
                                              see that I can't? I am truly interested.Please let me know, Just in
                                              case, as I suspect, I
                                              may be expecting too much!
                                              Corky.
                                            • P. Clay Sherrod
                                              Mars is the most difficult of all planets to view; please go to my website and study the Guide to Observing Mars link on the homepage.... I think that this
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Dec 21, 2007
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                                                Mars is the most difficult of all planets to view; please go to my website and study the
                                                Guide to Observing Mars link on the homepage....
                                                I think that this will help you understand the difficulties and the rewards of pursuing
                                                your study of Mars.
                                                http://www.arksky.org/index.php?pid=4
                                                Even in the largest telescopes, Mars is seemingly devoid of detail until one learns to
                                                identify the faint hues, subtle contrasts and hints of features hidden by both glare and
                                                Martian clouds.

                                                ....and, it is very, very small compared to even Saturn.

                                                Best of luck; the Guide at ASO will help you greatly.

                                                Dr. Clay
                                                -------------
                                                Arkansas Sky Observatories
                                                Harvard MPC/ H43 (Conway)
                                                Harvard MPC/ H41 (Petit Jean Mountain)
                                                Harvard MPC/ H45 (Petit Jean Mtn. South)
                                                http://www.arksky.org/


                                                ----- Original Message -----
                                                From: "corky23394" <a.corkhill@...>
                                                To: <lx90@yahoogroups.com>
                                                Sent: Friday, December 21, 2007 5:44 PM
                                                Subject: [lx90] Mars


                                                >I am growing seriously tired of all the expectations delivered to me
                                                > through various media. Truth is, I own a 12" scope, and visually I can
                                                > see absolutely no detail on Mars whatsoever! I have taken expert advice
                                                > but to no avail. Are we all kidding ourselves? What can you old timers
                                                > see that I can't? I am truly interested.Please let me know, Just in
                                                > case, as I suspect, I
                                                > may be expecting too much!
                                                > Corky.
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > To unsubscribe from this group mailto lx90-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > --
                                                > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                                > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                                > Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.17.6/1192 - Release Date: 12/21/2007 1:17 PM
                                                >
                                                >
                                              • Tom Vilot
                                                I am going to formally beg you to get rid of the red text on gray background. It is very difficult to read.
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Dec 21, 2007
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                                                  I am going to formally beg you to get rid of the red text on gray
                                                  background.

                                                  It is very difficult to read.



                                                  On Dec 21, 2007, at 4:56 PM, P. Clay Sherrod wrote:

                                                  > Mars is the most difficult of all planets to view; please go to my
                                                  > website and study the
                                                  > Guide to Observing Mars link on the homepage....
                                                  > I think that this will help you understand the difficulties and the
                                                  > rewards of pursuing
                                                  > your study of Mars.
                                                  > http://www.arksky.org/index.php?pid=4
                                                  > Even in the largest telescopes, Mars is seemingly devoid of detail
                                                  > until one learns to
                                                  > identify the faint hues, subtle contrasts and hints of features
                                                  > hidden by both glare and
                                                  > Martian clouds.
                                                  >
                                                  > ....and, it is very, very small compared to even Saturn.
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                • AstronomyW4WMM@aol.com
                                                  Speaking of Mars. There is a 1 in 75 chance that an asteroid will hit it on January 30th. Right now the calculations show that it could hit it or pass
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , Dec 21, 2007
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                                                    Speaking of Mars. There is a 1 in 75 chance that an asteroid will hit it on
                                                    January 30th. Right now the calculations show that it could hit it or pass
                                                    30,000 miles away from it.

                                                    FULL STORY at
                                                    http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/21dec_2007wd5.htm?list902305

                                                    ====================
                                                    Looking Up,
                                                    Alan
                                                    30.69° N 88.24° W



                                                    **************************************See AOL's top rated recipes
                                                    (http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)


                                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  • Mitch
                                                    Of course, that s a 99% chance that it will miss. Mitch ... From: AstronomyW4WMM@aol.com To: lx90@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, December 21, 2007 11:06 PM
                                                    Message 25 of 30 , Dec 21, 2007
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                                                      Of course, that's a 99% chance that it will miss. Mitch
                                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                                      From: AstronomyW4WMM@...
                                                      To: lx90@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Sent: Friday, December 21, 2007 11:06 PM
                                                      Subject: Re: [lx90] Mars


                                                      Speaking of Mars. There is a 1 in 75 chance that an asteroid will hit it on
                                                      January 30th. Right now the calculations show that it could hit it or pass
                                                      30,000 miles away from it.

                                                      FULL STORY at
                                                      http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/21dec_2007wd5.htm?list902305

                                                      ====================
                                                      Looking Up,
                                                      Alan
                                                      30.69° N 88.24° W

                                                      **************************************See AOL's top rated recipes
                                                      (http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)

                                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    • Peter Vasey
                                                      Hi, Tom, yes it is uncomfortable isn t it - a bit disorientatingngngng! Until (if) Clay changes it, you may be able to alter the colour settings in your
                                                      Message 26 of 30 , Dec 22, 2007
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                                                        Hi, Tom, yes it is uncomfortable isn't it - a bit disorientatingngngng!

                                                        Until (if) Clay changes it, you may be able to alter the colour settings
                                                        in your browser - I mainly use Netscape Navigator, and can alter it so
                                                        that the page shows up in simple black and white.
                                                        <Edit><Preferences><Appearance><Colours> Set to 'Use my chosen colours'
                                                        with Text black and Background white. Then refresh the page.

                                                        In Internet Explorer, it's also easy: <Tools><Internet Options><General
                                                        tab><Accessibility>

                                                        Select 'Ignore colors specified on webpages'. No need to refresh.

                                                        Cheers, Peter.

                                                        http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/astroplover/index.html
                                                        Approx. 55ºN, 2ºW (Northumberland, UK)


                                                        Tom Vilot wrote:
                                                        > I am going to formally beg you to get rid of the red text on gray
                                                        > background.
                                                        >
                                                        > It is very difficult to read.
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > On Dec 21, 2007, at 4:56 PM, P. Clay Sherrod wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >>Mars is the most difficult of all planets to view; please go to my
                                                        >>website and study the
                                                        >>Guide to Observing Mars link on the homepage....
                                                        >>I think that this will help you understand the difficulties and the
                                                        >>rewards of pursuing
                                                        >>your study of Mars.
                                                        >>http://www.arksky.org/index.php?pid=4
                                                        >>Even in the largest telescopes, Mars is seemingly devoid of detail
                                                        >>until one learns to
                                                        >>identify the faint hues, subtle contrasts and hints of features
                                                        >>hidden by both glare and
                                                        >>Martian clouds.
                                                        >>
                                                        >>....and, it is very, very small compared to even Saturn.
                                                      • Henrik VAN HOLTHOON
                                                        Hi Ed, Nice pictures surprising with the same scope as I have, this is apparently what you achieve with a good camera and good seeing conditions and experience
                                                        Message 27 of 30 , Jan 2, 2008
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                                                          Hi Ed,
                                                          Nice pictures surprising with the same scope as I have, this is apparently what you achieve with a good camera and good seeing conditions and experience as you must have, but my question to you is did you look before taking photos through the ocular and if you did can you describe what you where seeing. Orange disk, some details etc.
                                                          Regards Henrik

                                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                        • Edward Roach
                                                          Hi Henrik, Thank you. I did look through the eyepiece, but not very long. I observed with a 20mm plossl and a 2x barlow and I could make out the albedo
                                                          Message 28 of 30 , Jan 2, 2008
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                                                            Hi Henrik,

                                                            Thank you. I did look through the eyepiece, but not very long. I observed with a 20mm plossl and a 2x barlow and I could make out the albedo features, but not the polar hood. It had slight coloration, but nothing like the image. Syrtis Major was actually more pronounced just using the 20mm eyepiece alone, but the disc just seemed too small to be pleasing.
                                                            I observed Mars two years ago under much better seeing conditions and it makes a world of difference. Not so much in the color, but the surface detail on the planet itself, but the larger size of the disc at that time probably made a big difference too.

                                                            Regards,
                                                            Ed Roach

                                                            Henrik VAN HOLTHOON <henrik.van.holthoon@...> wrote:
                                                            Hi Ed,
                                                            Nice pictures surprising with the same scope as I have, this is apparently what you achieve with a good camera and good seeing conditions and experience as you must have, but my question to you is did you look before taking photos through the ocular and if you did can you describe what you where seeing. Orange disk, some details etc.
                                                            Regards Henrik

                                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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