Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: LX90 8" Dew Shield

Expand Messages
  • kimlx90
    Hi Paul, Just came accross this http://www.telescopeplanet.co.uk/ViewProdDetails.asp?prod_code=PON03K000071 if you still want a hard dew sheild. Says in stock.
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 1, 2006
      Hi Paul,

      Just came accross this
      http://www.telescopeplanet.co.uk/ViewProdDetails.asp?prod_code=PON03K000071

      if you still want a hard dew sheild. Says in stock.

      Kim

      --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "pauled51" <paul.edwards@...> wrote:
      >
      > Winter is approaching and I've had an 8" hard dew shield (Meade) on
      > back order from Telescope House in the UK since March 06 - still no
      > sign of a shipment from Meade yet! Anyway, this will be my first
      > winter observing and I'm guessing that a dew shield (or heater) is
      > essential. Several questions:
      > 1. I'm going for the hard dew shield as I'm guessing that it is
      > significantly more effective than a soft version + I've just taken
      > delivery of a 2" diagonal, so the hard dew shield should help to
      > balance the scope.
      > 2. Can I buy one from another vendor in the UK? I'm assuming (maybe
      > wrongly) that if Telescope House don't have them, then neither
      > should anyone else (being that they are the main importer of Meade
      > products).
      > 3. What are the alternatives? Dew Heaters, or do they also need a
      > shield? Generally more expensive, but is the extra expense worth it?
      > 4. I live in Crawley, West Sussex, UK, so light polution is a
      > problem. The dew shield should help with light polution - true? If
      > yes, does the hard or soft dew shield work the best?
      >
      > Lot's of questions, so hope you have the time to answer.
      >
      > Just to finish off, I'd like to say that I've been following this
      > group for over a year now and it is full of very knowledgeable and
      > dedicated people. Astronomy is a great pursuit made better by this
      > group!
      >
      > It's raining and I wish for clear skies.
      >
      > Paul
      > Crawley, UK
      >
    • Kory Hamzeh
      Hello Everyone, I m relative novice to astrophotography. I currently own a Meade ETX125AT, which is quite limited in what it can do in terms of
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 1, 2006
        Hello Everyone,

        I'm relative novice to astrophotography. I currently own a Meade
        ETX125AT, which is quite limited in what it can do in terms of
        astrophotography. I also own a Meade DSI Pro. I'm looking at purchasing
        a telescope that I can use both for viewing and also deep sky
        photography. I'm partially handicapped and although I'm not in a
        wheelchair, I can not lift anything heavier than 40 pounds. The scope
        that I was looking at was the Celestron CGE 11. During a discussion with
        Dr. Clay Sherrod, he suggested the LX90 with the 8" aperture. It fits my
        weight limitations, but I'm concerned about the 8" in astrophotography
        applications. It seems that almost every "decent" deep sky image I have
        seen has been with a 10" or larger. I'm not questioning Dr. Clay's
        suggestions, I'm just trying to understand it better because of my lack
        of experience.

        How does the LX90 8" fair in astrophotography applications? Does the DRI
        Pro work well with it?

        Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

        Thanks,
        Kory
      • jonpugh114
        Hello Kory, I ve seen stunning deep sky images taken with 80mm refractors, so 8 is plenty. You could always look into converting a shed into an observatory,
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 1, 2006
          Hello Kory,

          I've seen stunning deep sky images taken with 80mm refractors, so 8"
          is plenty. You could always look into converting a shed into an
          observatory, that way you won't have to do any lifting at all,
          because an LX90 gains a lot of weight if you add a wedge, guidescope
          and counter weights. You'll also find that the more hassle involved
          in setting up, the less you'll use it.

          Cheers

          Jon




          --- In lx90@yahoogroups.com, "Kory Hamzeh" <kory@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hello Everyone,
          >
          > I'm relative novice to astrophotography. I currently own a Meade
          > ETX125AT, which is quite limited in what it can do in terms of
          > astrophotography. I also own a Meade DSI Pro. I'm looking at
          purchasing
          > a telescope that I can use both for viewing and also deep sky
          > photography. I'm partially handicapped and although I'm not in a
          > wheelchair, I can not lift anything heavier than 40 pounds. The
          scope
          > that I was looking at was the Celestron CGE 11. During a
          discussion with
          > Dr. Clay Sherrod, he suggested the LX90 with the 8" aperture. It
          fits my
          > weight limitations, but I'm concerned about the 8" in
          astrophotography
          > applications. It seems that almost every "decent" deep sky image I
          have
          > seen has been with a 10" or larger. I'm not questioning Dr. Clay's
          > suggestions, I'm just trying to understand it better because of my
          lack
          > of experience.
          >
          > How does the LX90 8" fair in astrophotography applications? Does
          the DRI
          > Pro work well with it?
          >
          > Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Kory
          >
        • Colin Dawson
          Hi Kory. The LX-90 8 is a good scope for Astrophotography. I ve had one for about 5 years now and find that the limitations are not the scope, but a mixture
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 2, 2006
            Hi Kory.

            The LX-90 8" is a good scope for Astrophotography. I've had one for about 5
            years now and find that the limitations are not the scope, but a mixture of
            bad weather and lack of experience. I have managed to get a couple of
            superb images (check out the gallery on my website www.cjdawson.com).

            I don't agree with Doc Clay about the weight issue. As another member has
            said, the scope can accrete alot of weight if you head towards a setup
            similar to mine - wedge, guidescope etc). There is also the problem that
            of setting up the scope - with a wedge it's rather awkward as you need to
            lift the scope, screw in a bit then hang the OTA onto the wedge. Having
            said that, using CCD cameras like the DSI, can allow for a series of short
            exposures so you won't need to build a large system. Might be worth a try.

            Regards
            Colin Dawson
            www.cjdawson.com

            _____

            From: lx90@yahoogroups.com [mailto:lx90@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kory
            Hamzeh
            Sent: 01 October 2006 21:47
            To: lx90@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [lx90] LX90 8" For Astrophotography




            Hello Everyone,

            I'm relative novice to astrophotography. I currently own a Meade
            ETX125AT, which is quite limited in what it can do in terms of
            astrophotography. I also own a Meade DSI Pro. I'm looking at purchasing
            a telescope that I can use both for viewing and also deep sky
            photography. I'm partially handicapped and although I'm not in a
            wheelchair, I can not lift anything heavier than 40 pounds. The scope
            that I was looking at was the Celestron CGE 11. During a discussion with
            Dr. Clay Sherrod, he suggested the LX90 with the 8" aperture. It fits my
            weight limitations, but I'm concerned about the 8" in astrophotography
            applications. It seems that almost every "decent" deep sky image I have
            seen has been with a 10" or larger. I'm not questioning Dr. Clay's
            suggestions, I'm just trying to understand it better because of my lack
            of experience.

            How does the LX90 8" fair in astrophotography applications? Does the DRI
            Pro work well with it?

            Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

            Thanks,
            Kory






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Brad Draper
            Kory, Dr. Clay is correct, an 8 LX-90 should be all you need for taking great images. Check out the Meade_DSI Yahoo group, there are lots of people using 8
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 2, 2006
              Kory, Dr. Clay is correct, an 8" LX-90 should be all you need for taking great images. Check out the Meade_DSI Yahoo group, there are lots of people using 8" LX-90's that are taking wonderful images. It is what I use and I have been very pleased with it's performance. Don't thing that bigger is better when it comes to CCD Imaging!!! Brad D.
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Kory Hamzeh
              To: lx90@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, October 01, 2006 4:47 PM
              Subject: [lx90] LX90 8" For Astrophotography



              Hello Everyone,

              I'm relative novice to astrophotography. I currently own a Meade
              ETX125AT, which is quite limited in what it can do in terms of
              astrophotography. I also own a Meade DSI Pro. I'm looking at purchasing
              a telescope that I can use both for viewing and also deep sky
              photography. I'm partially handicapped and although I'm not in a
              wheelchair, I can not lift anything heavier than 40 pounds. The scope
              that I was looking at was the Celestron CGE 11. During a discussion with
              Dr. Clay Sherrod, he suggested the LX90 with the 8" aperture. It fits my
              weight limitations, but I'm concerned about the 8" in astrophotography
              applications. It seems that almost every "decent" deep sky image I have
              seen has been with a 10" or larger. I'm not questioning Dr. Clay's
              suggestions, I'm just trying to understand it better because of my lack
              of experience.

              How does the LX90 8" fair in astrophotography applications? Does the DRI
              Pro work well with it?

              Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

              Thanks,
              Kory





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.