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Calling all observers!

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  • Danny Caes
    A strange case... Here s a question to all observers of the moon and every other kind of celestial object (stars, deep-sky, etc...). I want to know if there
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 26, 2012
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      A strange case...
       
      Here's a question to all observers of the moon and every other kind of celestial object (stars, deep-sky, etc...).
      I want to know if there are members of the Lunar Observing Group (and other sky-related sites) who have ever observed the variable star S-Crateris through a low-power telescope? (a large aperture telescope).
      This star (S-CRT) looks quite bloodred on wide-angle photographs of the northeastern part in the constellation Crater (the Cup).
      I remember one such photograph made by Akira Fujii (of the Virgo/Corvus/Crater region), and it show'd a most distinct bloodred dot at the location of S-Crateris.
      There's another such photograph online, see:
      http://www.allthesky.com/constellations/crater/
      (click on the small photograph to see the complete scan, and try to detect the bloodred S-Crateris via a star-atlas such as Uranometria 2000.0).
      I want to observe S-Crateris when it is culminating, south of the (also culminating) Beta-Leonis; aka "Denebola" (note that there's a bright Mars nearby these days! Mars at its opposition!).
      S-Crateris is not mentioned on chart 89 of Charles Scovil's AAVSO atlas, and it is also absent on page 238 of the Sky Catalogue 2000.0; Volume 2 (the section Variable Stars).
      There's only one scientific article about S-Crateris online, but... not the slightest word about its bloodred color (or... is it not at all bloodred colored?) (is it only red on photographs?).
      P.S.:
      The coordinates of S-Crateris are:
      11:53 / -7:39 (epoch 2000.0).
      See also chart 282 in Wil Tirion's first edition of the Uranometria 2000.0 star-atlas (Willmann-Bell, 1987).

      Danny (into a new "red-star wave"!)
    • Danny Caes
      S-Crateris is also absent in the Espin-Birmingham catalogue of red stars (although it is an M-type star). See at 11:53.
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 26, 2012
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        S-Crateris is also absent in the Espin-Birmingham catalogue of red stars (although it is an M-type star).
        See at 11:53.
         
        (don't know if S-Crateris is one of those in the broad belt of to-be-occulted stars)(??)(it could be).
        P.S.:
        Mind the 40th anniversary of Apollo 16 in april!
         
        Danny
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2012 2:18 PM
        Subject: [lunar-observing] Calling all observers!

        A strange case...
         
        Here's a question to all observers of the moon and every other kind of celestial object (stars, deep-sky, etc...).
        I want to know if there are members of the Lunar Observing Group (and other sky-related sites) who have ever observed the variable star S-Crateris through a low-power telescope? (a large aperture telescope).
        This star (S-CRT) looks quite bloodred on wide-angle photographs of the northeastern part in the constellation Crater (the Cup).
        I remember one such photograph made by Akira Fujii (of the Virgo/Corvus/Crater region), and it show'd a most distinct bloodred dot at the location of S-Crateris.
        There's another such photograph online, see:
        http://www.allthesky.com/constellations/crater/
        (click on the small photograph to see the complete scan, and try to detect the bloodred S-Crateris via a star-atlas such as Uranometria 2000.0).
        I want to observe S-Crateris when it is culminating, south of the (also culminating) Beta-Leonis; aka "Denebola" (note that there's a bright Mars nearby these days! Mars at its opposition!).
        S-Crateris is not mentioned on chart 89 of Charles Scovil's AAVSO atlas, and it is also absent on page 238 of the Sky Catalogue 2000.0; Volume 2 (the section Variable Stars).
        There's only one scientific article about S-Crateris online, but... not the slightest word about its bloodred color (or... is it not at all bloodred colored?) (is it only red on photographs?).
        P.S.:
        The coordinates of S-Crateris are:
        11:53 / -7:39 (epoch 2000.0).
        See also chart 282 in Wil Tirion's first edition of the Uranometria 2000.0 star-atlas (Willmann-Bell, 1987).

        Danny (into a new "red-star wave"!)
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