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RE: [lunar-observing] Re: Some Images From Jan and Feb

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  • bob_p@earthlink.net
    HI Eric, Thanks so much for the feedback. The FSQ is a lot of fun to use and more forgiving of seeing conditions than most scopes. Regards, Bob P.S. Hope you
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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      HI Eric,
      Thanks so much for the feedback. The FSQ is a lot of fun to use and more forgiving of seeing conditions than most scopes.

      Regards, Bob

      P.S. Hope you have some clear skies and steady seeing.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Eric Roel
      To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: 3/2/2006 2:24:45 PM
      Subject: [lunar-observing] Re: Some Images From Jan and Feb


      Bob:
      Superb images taken with your 106mm FSQ, Bob, you have a killer scope
      aside of your skills as an imager. I have seen many images taken
      through those scopes and others and as usual, you can find good to
      superb scope specimens. Congratulations,
      Eric. (M�xico)










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    • bob_p@earthlink.net
      Hi Tom, Thanks very much! I always like the mid to upper latitude shots on the moon cause they do seem to have more depth to them - more visual clues due to
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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        Hi Tom,
        Thanks very much! I always like the mid to upper latitude shots on the moon cause they do seem to have more depth to them - more visual clues due to the foreshortening of the craters I guess.

        Regards, Bob


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Tom Bash
        To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: 3/2/2006 2:55:54 PM
        Subject: [lunar-observing] Re: Some Images From Jan and Feb


        Great shots Bob! Your Tycho image looks 3-D!

        Regards,
        Tom

        --- In lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com, "bob_p@..." <bob_p@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I've been fortunate to have had some very good to excellent seeing
        conditions several times earlier this year. Here's a few of the
        better images:
        >
        > Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the small S-
        shaped feature starting just at the E end of Copernicus' central
        mountain complex. As far as I can tell this is a displacement in
        surface level where the upslope is here illuminated by the rising
        sun. Maybe part of it would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it
        would be in the shadow of the mountain.
        > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
        >
        > Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to capture
        several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava patterns (running
        NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare Frigoris interesting - they
        looked like several descending stairs or maybe waves coming into a
        beach. I was also intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run
        almost at right angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
        > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
        >
        > Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first time
        I've had sufficient resolution in this area to see the large number
        of small secondary craters surrounding Tycho.
        > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
        >
        > Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the ejecta
        around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative smoothness of the
        maria. Also there's an area in the lower right just above the rille
        and to the left of the mare area - at first it looked like a short
        horizontal band that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred
        to me but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough
        than the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image artifact.
        What would cause such an area?
        > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
        >
        > Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I hadn't even
        heard of Orontius (the large somewhat pentagonal crater above
        center) before looking at this image. Orontius' floor is really
        covered in ejecta and secondary craters except for (presumably) the
        more recent Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much
        smoother floor. Orontius F is interesting to me because of the very
        straight shadow shown here and at the 12 o'clock position what looks
        to be a spill of light colored material from the wall across the
        floor. The contrast with the dark colored floor was striking to me.
        Many other secondary crater chains in this whole area.
        > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
        >
        > Regards, Bob
        >
        > Details:
        > - Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
        > - Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK 21BF04 B/W
        Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
        > - 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000 to 1800
        out of 6000 frames
        > - Processed in Registax, PS CS
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >






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      • bob_p@earthlink.net
        Hi Tony, Thanks very much! Regards, Bob ... From: Tony Gondola To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com Sent: 3/2/2006 7:32:59 PM Subject: Re: [lunar-observing]
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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          Hi Tony,
          Thanks very much!
          Regards, Bob


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Tony Gondola
          To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: 3/2/2006 7:32:59 PM
          Subject: Re: [lunar-observing] Some Images From Jan and Feb


          An excellent set of images Bob...........

          Tony


          bob_p@... wrote:

          >I've been fortunate to have had some very good to excellent seeing conditions several times earlier this year. Here's a few of the better images:
          >
          >Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the small S-shaped feature starting just at the E end of Copernicus' central mountain complex. As far as I can tell this is a displacement in surface level where the upslope is here illuminated by the rising sun. Maybe part of it would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it would be in the shadow of the mountain.
          >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
          >
          >Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to capture several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava patterns (running NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare Frigoris interesting - they looked like several descending stairs or maybe waves coming into a beach. I was also intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run almost at right angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
          >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
          >
          >Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first time I've had sufficient resolution in this area to see the large number of small secondary craters surrounding Tycho.
          >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
          >
          >Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the ejecta around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative smoothness of the maria. Also there's an area in the lower right just above the rille and to the left of the mare area - at first it looked like a short horizontal band that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred to me but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough than the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image artifact. What would cause such an area?
          >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
          >
          >Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I hadn't even heard of Orontius (the large somewhat pentagonal crater above center) before looking at this image. Orontius' floor is really covered in ejecta and secondary craters except for (presumably) the more recent Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much smoother floor. Orontius F is interesting to me because of the very straight shadow shown here and at the 12 o'clock position what looks to be a spill of light colored material from the wall across the floor. The contrast with the dark colored floor was striking to me. Many other secondary crater chains in this whole area.
          >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
          >
          >Regards, Bob
          >
          >Details:
          >- Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
          >- Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK 21BF04 B/W Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
          >- 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000 to 1800 out of 6000 frames
          >- Processed in Registax, PS CS
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >



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        • bob_p@earthlink.net
          Hi Stefan, I very much appreciate the feedback! I ve been struggling with exposure on a number of images and in trying not to blow out hilites have had too
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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            Hi Stefan,
            I very much appreciate the feedback! I've been struggling with exposure on a number of images and in trying not to blow out hilites have had too much underexposure which is not helpful to a well toned image. I'll have to work on that.

            Regards, Bob

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: slammel
            To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: 3/2/2006 8:35:08 PM
            Subject: [lunar-observing] Re: Some Images From Jan and Feb


            These images show a huge amount of detail Bob and your observations
            raise some interesting questions, I just wish I could answer some for
            you!

            The processing techniques you are using now seem to be working well
            for you in terms of extracting the maximum amount of detail. If I was
            to be just the tiniest bit critical I would say they are more severe
            than your earlier images which had a more subtle appearance. For
            example your image of Janssen still has a stunning amount of detail
            when you look closely.

            Just my 2 cents worth as they say - I'm still in awe of what you
            achieve with this scope!

            Regards,
            Stefan

            --- In lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com, "bob_p@..." <bob_p@...> wrote:
            >
            > I've been fortunate to have had some very good to excellent seeing
            conditions several times earlier this year. Here's a few of the better
            images:
            >
            > Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the small S-shaped
            feature starting just at the E end of Copernicus' central mountain
            complex. As far as I can tell this is a displacement in surface level
            where the upslope is here illuminated by the rising sun. Maybe part of
            it would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it would be in the shadow
            of the mountain.
            > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
            >
            > Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to capture
            several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava patterns (running
            NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare Frigoris interesting - they looked
            like several descending stairs or maybe waves coming into a beach. I
            was also intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run almost at right
            angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
            > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
            >
            > Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first time I've
            had sufficient resolution in this area to see the large number of
            small secondary craters surrounding Tycho.
            > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
            >
            > Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the ejecta
            around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative smoothness of the
            maria. Also there's an area in the lower right just above the rille
            and to the left of the mare area - at first it looked like a short
            horizontal band that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred
            to me but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough than
            the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image artifact. What
            would cause such an area?
            > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
            >
            > Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I hadn't even
            heard of Orontius (the large somewhat pentagonal crater above center)
            before looking at this image. Orontius' floor is really covered in
            ejecta and secondary craters except for (presumably) the more recent
            Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much smoother floor.
            Orontius F is interesting to me because of the very straight shadow
            shown here and at the 12 o'clock position what looks to be a spill of
            light colored material from the wall across the floor. The contrast
            with the dark colored floor was striking to me. Many other secondary
            crater chains in this whole area.
            > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
            >
            > Regards, Bob
            >
            > Details:
            > - Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
            > - Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK 21BF04 B/W
            Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
            > - 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000 to 1800 out
            of 6000 frames
            > - Processed in Registax, PS CS
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >





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          • bob_p@earthlink.net
            Hi David, Thanks very much! I think the Questar could also produce really excellent results. I had one about 30 years ago and optically (and mechanically) it
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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              Hi David,
              Thanks very much! I think the Questar could also produce really excellent results. I had one about 30 years ago and optically (and mechanically) it was first rate. I remember some of the film images of the moon Questar used to advertise with and they were quite impressive - today's cameras and especially processing techniques should be able to do even better. With a 2x barlow it would be at an ideal focal length to match some of todays cameras. Good luck and I look forward to seeing your images!

              Regards, Bob


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: David Dench
              To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: 3/3/2006 2:43:22 AM
              Subject: [lunar-observing] Re: Some Images From Jan and Feb


              Bob,
              your images are absolutely marvellous. They have stung me into action
              ( well mental action that is ;). I have never come close to these
              with my Questar3.5 the way I have traditionally used it ( alt-az,
              undriven, hand-guided ). But if a small scope is capable of such
              images, I must have a go at mounting it equatorially and getting
              some longer AVI runs.
              Of course, now all I need is sufficient clear nights and
              a hefty dose of good seeing and ...
              Very best wishes,
              David
              >
              > Regards, Bob
              >
              > Details:
              > - Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
              > - Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK 21BF04 B/W
              Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
              > - 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000 to 1800 out
              of 6000 frames
              > - Processed in Registax, PS CS
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >






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            • Paolo R. Lazzarotti
              A great result indeed, Bob! I love your processing as well the resolution! I think my next instrument won t be larger than 100mm if weather here will go on
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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                A great result indeed, Bob!
                I love your processing as well the resolution!
                I think my next instrument won't be larger than 100mm if weather here
                will go on this way! :-(((

                bob_p@... wrote:

                >I've been fortunate to have had some very good to excellent seeing conditions several times earlier this year. Here's a few of the better images:
                >
                >Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the small S-shaped feature starting just at the E end of Copernicus' central mountain complex. As far as I can tell this is a displacement in surface level where the upslope is here illuminated by the rising sun. Maybe part of it would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it would be in the shadow of the mountain.
                >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
                >
                >Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to capture several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava patterns (running NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare Frigoris interesting - they looked like several descending stairs or maybe waves coming into a beach. I was also intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run almost at right angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
                >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
                >
                >Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first time I've had sufficient resolution in this area to see the large number of small secondary craters surrounding Tycho.
                >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
                >
                >Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the ejecta around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative smoothness of the maria. Also there's an area in the lower right just above the rille and to the left of the mare area - at first it looked like a short horizontal band that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred to me but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough than the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image artifact. What would cause such an area?
                >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
                >
                >Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I hadn't even heard of Orontius (the large somewhat pentagonal crater above center) before looking at this image. Orontius' floor is really covered in ejecta and secondary craters except for (presumably) the more recent Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much smoother floor. Orontius F is interesting to me because of the very straight shadow shown here and at the 12 o'clock position what looks to be a spill of light colored material from the wall across the floor. The contrast with the dark colored floor was striking to me. Many other secondary crater chains in this whole area.
                >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
                >
                >Regards, Bob
                >
                >Details:
                >- Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
                >- Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK 21BF04 B/W Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
                >- 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000 to 1800 out of 6000 frames
                >- Processed in Registax, PS CS
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                --
                Ad astra per semper.

                \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_

                eng. Paolo R. Lazzarotti

                http://www.astromeccanica.it
                Italian High Quality Astro Instruments

                http://www.paololazzarotti.com
                Personal Photo Gallery
              • bob_p@earthlink.net
                Paolo, thanks very much! If my seeing was typically better I d be thinking about moving up to 315mm :) Hope the weather clears and seeing steadies for you.
                Message 7 of 15 , Mar 3, 2006
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                  Paolo, thanks very much! If my seeing was typically better I'd be thinking about moving up to 315mm :) Hope the weather clears and seeing steadies for you.

                  Regards, Bob


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Paolo R. Lazzarotti
                  To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: 3/3/2006 6:32:16 AM
                  Subject: Re: [lunar-observing] Some Images From Jan and Feb


                  A great result indeed, Bob!
                  I love your processing as well the resolution!
                  I think my next instrument won't be larger than 100mm if weather here
                  will go on this way! :-(((

                  bob_p@... wrote:

                  >I've been fortunate to have had some very good to excellent seeing conditions several times earlier this year. Here's a few of the better images:
                  >
                  >Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the small S-shaped feature starting just at the E end of Copernicus' central mountain complex. As far as I can tell this is a displacement in surface level where the upslope is here illuminated by the rising sun. Maybe part of it would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it would be in the shadow of the mountain.
                  >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
                  >
                  >Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to capture several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava patterns (running NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare Frigoris interesting - they looked like several descending stairs or maybe waves coming into a beach. I was also intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run almost at right angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
                  >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
                  >
                  >Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first time I've had sufficient resolution in this area to see the large number of small secondary craters surrounding Tycho.
                  >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
                  >
                  >Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the ejecta around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative smoothness of the maria. Also there's an area in the lower right just above the rille and to the left of the mare area - at first it looked like a short horizontal band that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred to me but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough than the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image artifact. What would cause such an area?
                  >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
                  >
                  >Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I hadn't even heard of Orontius (the large somewhat pentagonal crater above center) before looking at this image. Orontius' floor is really covered in ejecta and secondary craters except for (presumably) the more recent Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much smoother floor. Orontius F is interesting to me because of the very straight shadow shown here and at the 12 o'clock position what looks to be a spill of light colored material from the wall across the floor. The contrast with the dark colored floor was striking to me. Many other secondary crater chains in this whole area.
                  >http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
                  >
                  >Regards, Bob
                  >
                  >Details:
                  >- Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
                  >- Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK 21BF04 B/W Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
                  >- 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000 to 1800 out of 6000 frames
                  >- Processed in Registax, PS CS
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --
                  Ad astra per semper.

                  \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_ \_

                  eng. Paolo R. Lazzarotti

                  http://www.astromeccanica.it
                  Italian High Quality Astro Instruments

                  http://www.paololazzarotti.com
                  Personal Photo Gallery




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                • Peter Lloyd
                  Hello Bob. Straight shadows are intriguing aren t they. I had a very similar puzzle over an image of Eimmart a while back. If you are interested, it is on my
                  Message 8 of 15 , Mar 5, 2006
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                    Hello Bob.

                    Straight shadows are intriguing aren't they. I had a very
                    similar puzzle over an image of Eimmart a while back. If
                    you are interested, it is on my Mare Crisium page
                    http://www.madpc.net/~peterl/Moon/Craters/MareCrisium050314.html

                    Very nice pictures!

                    Regards,

                    Peter

                    "bob_p@..." wrote:
                    >
                    > I've been fortunate to have had some very good to
                    > excellent seeing conditions several times earlier this
                    > year. Here's a few of the better images:
                    >
                    > Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the
                    > small S-shaped feature starting just at the E end of
                    > Copernicus' central mountain complex. As far as I can tell
                    > this is a displacement in surface level where the upslope
                    > is here illuminated by the rising sun. Maybe part of it
                    > would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it would be in
                    > the shadow of the mountain.
                    > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
                    >
                    > Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to
                    > capture several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava
                    > patterns (running NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare
                    > Frigoris interesting - they looked like several descending
                    > stairs or maybe waves coming into a beach. I was also
                    > intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run almost at
                    > right angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
                    > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
                    >
                    > Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first
                    > time I've had sufficient resolution in this area to see
                    > the large number of small secondary craters surrounding
                    > Tycho.
                    > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
                    >
                    > Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the
                    > ejecta around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative
                    > smoothness of the maria. Also there's an area in the lower
                    > right just above the rille and to the left of the mare
                    > area - at first it looked like a short horizontal band
                    > that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred to me
                    > but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough
                    > than the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image
                    > artifact. What would cause such an area?
                    > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
                    >
                    > Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I
                    > hadn't even heard of Orontius (the large somewhat
                    > pentagonal crater above center) before looking at this
                    > image. Orontius' floor is really covered in ejecta and
                    > secondary craters except for (presumably) the more recent
                    > Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much
                    > smoother floor. Orontius F is interesting to me because of
                    > the very straight shadow shown here and at the 12 o'clock
                    > position what looks to be a spill of light colored
                    > material from the wall across the floor. The contrast with
                    > the dark colored floor was striking to me. Many other
                    > secondary crater chains in this whole area.
                    > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
                    >
                    > Regards, Bob
                    >
                    > Details:
                    > - Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
                    > - Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK
                    > 21BF04 B/W Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
                    > - 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000
                    > to 1800 out of 6000 frames
                    > - Processed in Registax, PS CS
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    --
                    Peter Lloyd
                    Bedfordshire, UK.
                    51º 56' 53"N 0º 32' 05"W
                    http://www.astrolloyd.tk
                  • bob_p@earthlink.net
                    Hi Peter, I remember the Eimmart discussion from a while back. I guess that s one reason the moon is so fascinating - the lighting is always different and
                    Message 9 of 15 , Mar 5, 2006
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                      Hi Peter, I remember the Eimmart discussion from a while back. I guess that's one reason the moon is so fascinating - the lighting is always different and provides interesting puzzles and insights.

                      Regards, Bob


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Peter Lloyd
                      To: lunar-observing@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: 3/5/2006 4:54:47 AM
                      Subject: Re: [lunar-observing] Some Images From Jan and Feb


                      Hello Bob.

                      Straight shadows are intriguing aren't they. I had a very
                      similar puzzle over an image of Eimmart a while back. If
                      you are interested, it is on my Mare Crisium page
                      http://www.madpc.net/~peterl/Moon/Craters/MareCrisium050314.html

                      Very nice pictures!

                      Regards,

                      Peter

                      "bob_p@..." wrote:
                      >
                      > I've been fortunate to have had some very good to
                      > excellent seeing conditions several times earlier this
                      > year. Here's a few of the better images:
                      >
                      > Copernicus, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:33. Note the
                      > small S-shaped feature starting just at the E end of
                      > Copernicus' central mountain complex. As far as I can tell
                      > this is a displacement in surface level where the upslope
                      > is here illuminated by the rising sun. Maybe part of it
                      > would cast a shadow at sunset but part of it would be in
                      > the shadow of the mountain.
                      > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725070
                      >
                      > Plato, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 00:46. I was happy to
                      > capture several craterlets in Plato. I also found the lava
                      > patterns (running NW to SE) N and NW of Plato in Mare
                      > Frigoris interesting - they looked like several descending
                      > stairs or maybe waves coming into a beach. I was also
                      > intrigued that there are also Dorsa that run almost at
                      > right angles to these Dorsa. Why did that happen?
                      > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56256497
                      >
                      > Tycho, Udate: 2006/02/08, Utime: 01:27. This is the first
                      > time I've had sufficient resolution in this area to see
                      > the large number of small secondary craters surrounding
                      > Tycho.
                      > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725107
                      >
                      > Aristoteles, Udate: 2006/02/05, Utime: 23:46. I liked the
                      > ejecta around Aritoteles contrasting with the relative
                      > smoothness of the maria. Also there's an area in the lower
                      > right just above the rille and to the left of the mare
                      > area - at first it looked like a short horizontal band
                      > that didn't get sharpened properly. It looks blurred to me
                      > but in looking at LO images it actually is much less rough
                      > than the area to the N and S of it so it's not an image
                      > artifact. What would cause such an area?
                      > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725039
                      >
                      > Orontius/Maginus, Udate: 2006/01/08, Utime: 00:26. I
                      > hadn't even heard of Orontius (the large somewhat
                      > pentagonal crater above center) before looking at this
                      > image. Orontius' floor is really covered in ejecta and
                      > secondary craters except for (presumably) the more recent
                      > Orontius F in the upper right part which has a much
                      > smoother floor. Orontius F is interesting to me because of
                      > the very straight shadow shown here and at the 12 o'clock
                      > position what looks to be a spill of light colored
                      > material from the wall across the floor. The contrast with
                      > the dark colored floor was striking to me. Many other
                      > secondary crater chains in this whole area.
                      > http://www.pbase.com/bob_p/image/56725476
                      >
                      > Regards, Bob
                      >
                      > Details:
                      > - Images taken at Lat: 35:36N, Long: 82:33W, Elev: ~900m
                      > - Tak FSQ-106mm refractor, Televue 5x Powermate, DMK
                      > 21BF04 B/W Firewire camera, Blue IR-block filter
                      > - 15fps, 1/27sec in all cases, Generally a stack of 1000
                      > to 1800 out of 6000 frames
                      > - Processed in Registax, PS CS
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      --
                      Peter Lloyd
                      Bedfordshire, UK.
                      51� 56' 53"N 0� 32' 05"W
                      http://www.astrolloyd.tk


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