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Re: [luf-team] developing SEE-1

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  • Andrew Robinson
    Lurk mode off... ... http://www.cat.org.uk/ ..has a large selection of fact sheets and how-to books on alternative technologies available by mail order. The
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 1, 2001
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      Lurk mode off...

      On Sat, Mar 31, 2001, Eric Hunting <hunting@...> wrote:

      >You might also want to contact the relatively nearby Center for Maximum
      >Potential Building Systems, an eco-architecture design group in Austin.
      >They might have some advice for construction approaches well suited to
      >the local environment and local resources. They can also offer tours of
      >eco-architecture in the region.

      http://www.cat.org.uk/

      ..has a large selection of fact sheets and how-to books on
      alternative technologies available by mail order. The actual centre
      is well worth a visit too, but that's probably a bit difficult as
      you're in the US. ;-)

      Anyway, my point is that if you see anything useful in their
      publication list I would be prepared to purchase and ship, defrayed
      against a year or 4's membership. US$12 is such a piddling little
      sum to get a bankers draft for...

      Contact me off list if you're interested.

      Regards

      <a>
      --
      Andrew Robinson, Specialist Registrar |<excession@...>
      in Anaesthesia & Intensive Care |<aeon@...>
      Stoke School of Anaesthesia, W Midlands, UK|

      Despite the cost of living,
      have you noticed how it remains so popular?
    • Andrew Robinson
      ... Website. ... [all from Centre for Alternative Technology www.cat.org.uk ] ... ..altogether comes to a grand total of UK?52.94 or US$91.35, plus postage.
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 1, 2001
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        On Sun, Apr 1, 2001, Richard Crews <RLCrews@...> wrote:

        >That is a kind offer, Andrew, thanks -- and an interesting and useful
        Website.
        >
        >"Off the Grid" looks like it might be very useful.
        >Also "Creative Sustainable Gardening"
        >"Tapping the Sun"
        >"Windpower Workshop"
        >and -- as long as our credit holds up --
        >"Power Plants"
        >"Sewage Solutions" and
        >"Lifting the Lid"
        >
        >and from the "Booklets and Factsheets" I'd like
        >"Solar Energy Factsheet" and
        >"Introducing . . . Biofuels"
        >
        >and from "Tipsheets"
        >"Composting Secrets" and
        >"Herb Spiral"

        [all from "Centre for Alternative Technology" www.cat.org.uk ]

        >That should cover your membership well into the 22d century. Perhaps
        >some other UKers would like to chip in.

        ..altogether comes to a grand total of UK?52.94 or US$91.35, plus postage.

        I can cover around half that at present. Any offers from other lurking
        Brits to make up the rest? Replies on or off list.

        I'll get a discount as a member of CAT, so the final total won't be quite
        as high as I calculated above, but I have to make the order by phone
        to make sure.

        Regards

        <a>
        --
        Andrew Robinson, Specialist Registrar |<excession@...>
        in Anaesthesia & Intensive Care |<aeon@...>
        Stoke School of Anaesthesia, W Midlands, UK|

        Who needs rhetorical questions?
      • Richard Crews
        That is a kind offer, Andrew, thanks -- and an interesting and useful Website. Off the Grid looks like it might be very useful. Also Creative Sustainable
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 1, 2001
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          Re: [luf-team] developing SEE-1
          That is a kind offer, Andrew, thanks -- and an interesting and useful Website.

          "Off the Grid" looks like it might be very useful.
          Also "Creative Sustainable Gardening"
          "Tapping the Sun"
          "Windpower Workshop"
          and -- as long as our credit holds up --
          "Power Plants"
          "Sewage Solutions" and
          "Lifting the Lid"

          and from the "Booklets and Factsheets" I'd like
          "Solar Energy Factsheet" and
          "Introducing . . . Biofuels"

          and from "Tipsheets"
          "Composting Secrets" and
          "Herb Spiral"

          That should cover your membership well into the 22d century.  Perhaps some other UKers would like to chip in.

          Cheers, Richard Crews


          Lurk mode off...

          On Sat, Mar 31, 2001, Eric Hunting <hunting@...> wrote:

          >You might also want to contact the relatively nearby Center for Maximum
          >Potential Building Systems, an eco-architecture design group in Austin.
          >They might have some advice for construction approaches well suited to
          >the local environment and local resources. They can also offer tours of
          >eco-architecture in the region.

          http://www.cat.org.uk/

          ..has a large selection of fact sheets and how-to books on
          alternative technologies available by mail order. The actual centre
          is well worth a visit too, but that's probably a bit difficult as
          you're in the US. ;-)

          Anyway, my point is that if you see anything useful in their
          publication list I would be prepared to purchase and ship, defrayed
          against a year or 4's membership. US$12 is such a piddling little
          sum to get a bankers draft for...

          Contact me off list if you're interested.

          Regards

          <a>
          --
          Andrew Robinson, Specialist Registrar      |<excession@...>
          in Anaesthesia & Intensive Care            |<aeon@...>
          Stoke School of Anaesthesia, W Midlands, UK|

                            Despite the cost of living,
                    have you noticed how it remains so popular?
        • Richard Crews
          That s great, Andrew, thanks. The books and booklets will be very helpful. The address here, by the way, is a private mail box where they will sign for
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 1, 2001
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            Re: [luf-team] Buying books from CAT
            That's great, Andrew, thanks.  The books and booklets will be very helpful.

            The address here, by the way, is a private mail box where they will sign for packages.  It costs only $4.60 a month -- the cost of living in Bastrop is remarkably low.

               Richard Crews
               (or, if you prefer, "The Living Universe Foundation" -- but it's safer to add "c/o Richard Crews"))
               103 Childers Drive, Suite E-335
               Bastrop, TX  78602

            Thanks again, Richard

            On Sun, Apr 1, 2001, Richard Crews <RLCrews@...> wrote:

            >That is a kind offer, Andrew, thanks -- and an interesting and useful
            Website.
            >
            >"Off the Grid" looks like it might be very useful.
            >Also "Creative Sustainable Gardening"
            >"Tapping the Sun"
            >"Windpower Workshop"
            >and -- as long as our credit holds up --
            >"Power Plants"
            >"Sewage Solutions" and
            >"Lifting the Lid"
            >
            >and from the "Booklets and Factsheets" I'd like
            >"Solar Energy Factsheet" and
            >"Introducing . . . Biofuels"
            >
            >and from "Tipsheets"
            >"Composting Secrets" and
            >"Herb Spiral"

            [all from "Centre for Alternative Technology" www.cat.org.uk ]

            >That should cover your membership well into the 22d century.  Perhaps
            >some other UKers would like to chip in.

            ..altogether comes to a grand total of UK?52.94 or US$91.35, plus postage.

            I can cover around half that at present. Any offers from other lurking
            Brits to make up the rest? Replies on or off list.

            I'll get a discount as a member of CAT, so the final total won't be quite
            as high as I calculated above, but I have to make the order by phone
            to make sure.

            Regards

            <a>
            --
            Andrew Robinson, Specialist Registrar      |<excession@...>
            in Anaesthesia & Intensive Care            |<aeon@...>
            Stoke School of Anaesthesia, W Midlands, UK|
          • Jerome Dodge
            I actually thought of a protective setup for mobiles in flood and tornado prone areas. It consists of a large vault-like concrete box in the ground with a slab
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 1, 2001
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              I actually thought of a protective setup for mobiles in flood and tornado
              prone areas. It consists of a large vault-like concrete box in the ground
              with a slab on floats in the bottom. all utilities are piped in through a
              track system in one end of it the way reciprocating machinery is fed power.
              The slab rises in a flood to lift the mobile or modular home. In a tornado,
              it drops into the ground for wind protection, and in case of both flood and
              tornado...
              you're screwed, basicly.
              Anyway, if you like the option of an inground home, it's pretty slick. I
              would put a foot or two of dirt and sod on top and a sunscoop skylight,
              maybe some hydraulics for when you want to move furniture in or out between
              floods. In-ground saves on air conditioning, too.


              >From: Richard Crews <RLCrews@...>
              >Reply-To: luf-team@yahoogroups.com
              >To: luf-team@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [luf-team] developing SEE-1
              >Date: Fri, 30 Mar 2001 18:54:26 -0800
              >
              >I'd like to know what ideas people have as to research and
              >construction that I can do now to further the evolution of SEE-1.
              >
              >Richard Crews

              _________________________________________________________________
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            • Iain Hallam
              ... Let me know what the postage will be, but I m happy to cover the other half. What form of payment would you want? - Iain.
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 3, 2001
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                > ...altogether comes to a grand total of UK?52.94 or US$91.35, plus postage.

                Let me know what the postage will be, but I'm happy to cover the other
                half. What form of payment would you want?

                - Iain.
              • Richard Crews
                Thanks much, guys (or, I guess, blokes ). The SEE-1 official library is under way. These, and other key materials, will be available for visitors to read --
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 4, 2001
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                  Re: [luf-team] Buying books from CAT
                  Thanks much, guys (or, I guess, "blokes').

                  The SEE-1 official library is under way.

                  These, and other key materials, will be available for visitors to read -- as well as for resident members to study and build stuff from.

                  You probably got our SEE-1 address here, but I'll send it along again --

                  Richard Crews
                  (or, if you prefer, "The Living Universe Foundation" -- but better add "c/o Richard Crews")
                  103 Childers Drive, Suite E-335
                  Bastrop, TX  78602

                  Cheers, Richard


                  > ...altogether comes to a grand total of UK?52.94 or US$91.35, plus postage.

                  Let me know what the postage will be, but I'm happy to cover the other
                  half. What form of payment would you want?

                  - Iain.
                • Eric Hunting
                  R. Crews writes; ... Sounds like it might be suitable for adobe bricks, though all clay is not the same. It s like concrete. There are different mixes of
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 4, 2001
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                    R. Crews writes;

                    >I believe soil analysis would be superfluous. The earth is rich loam
                    >over dense, utterly impermeable clay. I have thought of digging and
                    >shaping bricks -- sun drying turns them as hard a rocks. Do they
                    >need some glazing or covering to keep them from sogging up with the
                    >next rainy season?

                    Sounds like it might be suitable for adobe bricks, though all clay is not
                    the same. It's like concrete. There are different mixes of actual clay,
                    mineral aggregates, as well as organic material. Natural clay is
                    hydrophobic because when it contacts water the clay particles in the
                    outer surface of the material expand and become impermeable. This is why
                    they use a sheathing of Bentonite clay to protect underground buildings
                    from moisture. However, the hydrated layers becomes more plastic and so
                    the clay particles can be more easily moved around by gravity, surface
                    tension, the force of their own expansion, friction from moving water,
                    etc. When the water is removed the material dries and the clay particles
                    shrink, possibly shifting in position in the material matrix. This
                    results in flaking and fracturing of the outer surface. This is countered
                    by a certain volume of organic material -cellulose- in the mix, which
                    behaves in the manner of fiber reinforcement. Natural American style
                    adobe will also rely on a kind of 'glue' in the mortar which is made from
                    crushed prickly-pear cactus. (it's quite a sophisticated composite
                    material when it comes down to it) Natural adobe homes rely on a coating
                    of mud plaster to protect them from weathering. It's sort of a
                    sacrificial layer of the same basic material that isolates the structural
                    materials from wear and it has to be restored every few years. The
                    streamlined appearance of adobe structures is also intended to help in
                    this, minimizing rough surfaces and depressions where water might
                    accumulate when it rains. There's also a certain reliance on the dryness
                    of the climate to reduce the frequency of this surface restoration. More
                    modern adobe structures use a mix of adobe and conventional lime based
                    plaster. Cob homes and often rammed earth homes as well rely on isolating
                    the walls from moisture using overhanging roofs and just-above-grade
                    stone footings. The earth still soaks up humidity from the air but in a
                    manner similar to wood and without much structural deformation. This lets
                    these earth structures tolerate the climates of the UK, Washington state,
                    and Oregon. Traditional European cob homes use a white or beige lime
                    based exterior plaster covering. The cob-revival homes and rammed earth
                    homes here in the US use an adobe-like plaster.

                    You could probably make some things like planting containers and low
                    decorative walls or walkway borders with just stacked bricks alone,
                    accepting that they would probably have a life of only a couple years.
                    This can be extended by mixing in some portland cement. There's a popular
                    approach to making decorative containers for gardening based on simply
                    mixing earth and portland cement which can be hand-molded into different
                    shapes and decorated with rocks. It's often used for miniature container
                    gardens and Bonzai because the combination is easily colonized by moss
                    and lichen and produces attractive organic forms that are reminiscent of
                    Chinese landscape art.

                    >> I suggest looking for a source of used but clean 50
                    >>gallon polyethylene drums for containers. You can cut them in half to
                    >>make good rugged pots and use a couple whole to store rainwater. Standard
                    >>accessories for drum handling will put wheels and handles on them. Later
                    >>on they might be used for hydroponics.
                    >
                    >I have put in 9 fruit trees in bare root, and all seem to be doing
                    >well (thanks to the excessive late rain). I had some 50-gallon
                    >plastic (ex-onion) drums in Mill Valley, and they were indeed useful
                    >in several regards through the years. I don't know of any source in
                    >or near Bastrop. Do you? Does anyone?
                    >
                    >Keith suggests plastic trash cans from Walmart, and I have purchased
                    >one plastic garbage can there. I would want to have specific plans
                    >before I made further investment (my money is very limited).

                    Texas now has more chemical plants than New Jersey (scary, isn't it?) so
                    my thinking is that you might find these drums available free for the
                    asking. That's why I suggested the drums. Companies making food products
                    are probably the safer bet for avoiding toxic residues. Here in NJ you
                    can sometimes find them just by driving around. They get dumped all over
                    the place -though this being NJ it's not always clear what might be in
                    them or what they've been used for...

                    Feed troughs are good as planters, hydroponics containers, and the like
                    but they are pretty heavy.

                    >>You could also try getting into contact with other eco-villages in Texas

                    >For what purpose specifically? At any rate, feel free to contact them.

                    Volunteer labor, loans of equipment and tools, advice on dealing with
                    local conditions, agencies, and society, examples of working architecture
                    and systems, technical support for building, leads on local support
                    opportunities, trading of resources, freebies like seeds, cuttings,
                    surplus food. Basic community networking. Most people setting up planned
                    communities are big on the idea of 'community' and so they frequently
                    help others trying to do the same thing. Considering how hard it is to
                    get LUF members out to work with you, you should exploit what local
                    sources for help you can.



                    Eric Hunting

                    hunting@...
                  • Andrew Robinson
                    Your books should be with you within 14 days. Thanks to Iain Hallam, the cheque arrived this am. Regards -- Andrew Robinson, Specialist Registrar
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 12, 2001
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                      Your books should be with you within 14 days.

                      Thanks to Iain Hallam, the cheque arrived this am.

                      Regards

                      <a>
                      --
                      Andrew Robinson, Specialist Registrar |<excession@...>
                      in Anaesthesia & Intensive Care |<aeon@...>
                      Stoke School of Anaesthesia, W Midlands, UK|

                      Just remember...if the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off
                    • Richard Crews
                      That s great, thanks. And the SEE-1 library thanks you -- and all future users. In fact, all of the LUF -- in fact, all sentient beings, past, present, and
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 12, 2001
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                        Re: [luf-team] Buying books from CAT
                        That's great, thanks.  And the SEE-1 library thanks you -- and all future users.  In fact, all of the LUF -- in fact, all sentient beings, past, present, and future . . . well, you get the idea.

                        Cheers, Richard

                        Your books should be with you within 14 days.

                        Thanks to Iain Hallam, the cheque arrived this am.

                        Regards

                        <a>
                        --
                        Andrew Robinson,
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