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Re: shipping containers used for housing

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  • Eric Hunting
    I ve done extensive study of this subject and have proposed container use for eco-village and Aquarius seed settlement development. There is even some
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1 7:30 AM
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      I've done extensive study of this subject and have proposed container
      use for eco-village and Aquarius seed settlement development. There is
      even some potential for using containers as the basis of simple float
      platforms, though more work needs to be done on that concept.

      Shipping containers can make for great homes with any level of
      simplicity or luxury one might imagine. They are commonly used for
      housing around the world and there is quite a craze today among
      architects to experiment with them. However, they are far less common
      in the US than anywhere else, the reason being that costs for custom
      metalworking for container modding is more expensive in the US than
      anywhere else in the world. (this being due to 'executive premium'
      pricing; the premium added to the price of most non-wholesale non-
      commodity goods and services sold business-to-business in the US based
      on the presumption that one's customer is the equivalent of Dilbert's
      Pointy Haired Boss who is too important to spend time shopping around
      and will routinely pay any amount of money for anything as long as he
      can get what he wants yesterday) Consequently, unless you or your
      friends have good metalworking skills or can find a standardized
      prefab container home like the roughly $160k Quick-House (http://www.quik-build.com/index.htm
      ) you'll pay an order of magnitude more for a container mod home in
      the US than anywhere else in the world -even using recycled
      containers. Of course, the current economic situation may be changing
      this as the companies doing container mod work have tended to be very
      over-specialized in market and may be in dire straights today.

      The actual process of adapting a container for housing is not terribly
      complicated and there are a few self-published books on the subject
      floating around on the Internet. One of the things that contribute to
      high cost with these is over-elaborate design common to many architect-
      designed container mods and the tendency for people to try and
      disguise the container to make its exterior appear less industrial and
      more like the banal suburban stick-frame housing. But if one can use
      containers in ways that require as little physical modification as
      possible the adaptation costs are much reduced. Using the ends for
      windows and doors or making large open sections in sides rather than
      'framing' windows and doors is more practical. The work of the
      architects at Hybrid Seattle (http://www.hybridseattle.com/) are an
      excellent example and some of their recent 'cargotecture' designs have
      direct application for Aquarius Seed type projects, such as the
      c2000sft and c1920mu designs that in many ways parallel the T-slot
      based UtiliHab-based strategy I've proposed in TMP2. The chief design
      limitation tends to be that an 8 foot wide space is often thought of
      as cramped and paired or triplet containers (joined side-by-side) tend
      to make better building units than solitary containers. This whole
      side-to-side join still represents a significant bit of metalworking,
      especially if intended to be demountable or to allow for on-side
      assembly of the sections. Insulated containers, used for refrigerated
      goods, are the easiest type to modify as they typically have aluminum
      plank floors, great insulation already installed, and smooth stainless
      steel interior skins that support mounting of hardware with pop-rivet
      screw sockets (rivkels), work fine exposed for kitchen and bath areas,
      and can easily be covered in simple textiles for a warmer feel. But
      these tend to be rarer and more expensive than the standard dry good
      shipping containers which some designers prefer for their corrugated
      exterior surface even though their interiors require complete framing
      to host insulation and drywall or planking.

      One of the best sources of information on-line about container housing
      is the Container Bay section of the FabPrefab web site;

      http://www.fabprefab.com/fabfiles/containerbayhome.htm

      Eric Hunting
      erichunting@...


      > shipping containers used for housing

      > Posted by: "Jamie Brandenburg" jmepwr67@... jmepwr67Wed Feb
      > 11, 2009 4:39 pm (PST)

      > Have any of you guys researched the use of shipping containers for
      > housing? I am very interested in this use of recycling.
      >
      > Thanks for all the great information you put out here!
    • Jamal Wills
      It would be interesting to see something like these structures along the top of an ocean going barge. Jamal
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 4 4:20 PM
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        It would be interesting to see something like these structures along the top of an ocean going barge.

        Jamal
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