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what im looking into doing in my realestate dealings

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  • rward8
    My though s on what im doing in houseing Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any comments about it. First the outside of the building As you
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 2, 2008
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      My though's on what im doing in houseing





      Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any comments
      about it. First the outside of the building As you can see from the
      pictures.



      It not a very big house and it is under 50K to buy it. As for the roof
      im thinking about putting in about 20K solor singles in on the whole
      roof and the garage in the back.



      Im not sure what else I would do to the property beyond that on the
      outside.



      Now for stuff that moves beyond normal for a house any that I know of.



      I had this idea to cover a part of the house like two rooms on the
      outside wall with small camra maybe even the siding itself. On the
      inside would be something that would trigger the wall to seem to vanish
      as if you where looking outside. The main reason why I would even try
      this is because that one step closer to having a lcd wall.



      Another crazy idea I had was what I could do next after everthing above.



      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao
      <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao>
      Claytronics which is small computer's that can rearange
      themselves's I would like too see that in housing of some sort
      although a lot of testing would have too be done as well.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • rward8
      ... http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b344/bzald/houseing/021.jpg http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b344/bzald/houseing/023.jpg ... roof ... of. ... vanish ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 2, 2008
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        --- In luf-team@yahoogroups.com, "rward8" <rward8@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > My though's on what im doing in houseing
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any comments
        > about it. First the outside of the building As you can see from the
        > pictures.
        http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b344/bzald/houseing/021.jpg
        http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b344/bzald/houseing/023.jpg
        > http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b344/bzald/houseing/024.jpg
        > http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b344/bzald/houseing/025.jpg
        >
        > It not a very big house and it is under 50K to buy it. As for the
        roof
        > im thinking about putting in about 20K solor singles in on the whole
        > roof and the garage in the back.
        >
        >
        >
        > Im not sure what else I would do to the property beyond that on the
        > outside.
        >
        >
        >
        > Now for stuff that moves beyond normal for a house any that I know
        of.
        >
        >
        >
        > I had this idea to cover a part of the house like two rooms on the
        > outside wall with small camra maybe even the siding itself. On the
        > inside would be something that would trigger the wall to seem to
        vanish
        > as if you where looking outside. The main reason why I would even
        try
        > this is because that one step closer to having a lcd wall.
        >
        >
        >
        > Another crazy idea I had was what I could do next after everthing
        above.
        >
        >
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao
        > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao>
        > Claytronics which is small computer's that can rearange
        > themselves's I would like too see that in housing of some sort
        > although a lot of testing would have too be done as well.
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Eric Hunting
        Looking at the photos, I can see there is not much you can radically do to such a home in terms of structure. There s a lot of potential surface renovation but
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 10, 2008
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          Looking at the photos, I can see there is not much you can radically
          do to such a home in terms of structure. There's a lot of potential
          surface renovation but it also looks like it's in generally good shape
          and, outside of trying to make some kind of demonstration home or
          performing upgrades to reduce latent toxicity, it's not necessarily
          logical to replace functional stuff with new stuff just because the
          new stuff is labeled green.

          It looks to me like this house was built in the early 1950s and has
          seen two or three cycles of renovation, with the last within the last
          5 years and on a low budget. The back room is a late addition,
          probably produced by converting an open porch into, most likely, a
          laundry room and/or mother-in-law suite. It may have been used as a
          rental apartment.

          The roof line of the house and close spacing of the neighborhood are
          very problematic. (the area looked a lot like New Jersey to me...)
          Though the addition of solar shingles is a very good idea, there just
          is not going to be enough roof area in any one direction for solar
          power to function effectively. I would think the utility shed is
          probably better suited to adding solar than the main house is but
          there may be enough area for a supplemental solar water heater panel
          on some south-facing side of the house. If the area suits it, a small
          wind turbine might be something to consider too, though you are in a
          very dense suburban neighborhood and it would need to be one of the
          more discreet vertical type to not annoy neighbors.

          The back yard would be well suited to a victory garden and some
          creative landscaping work and I would put a lot into that. It has
          potential to be a real haven. I don't know what the interior layout is
          like, but the design of the rear extension looks atrocious, though it
          may have been a concession to stuff on the left hand side of the
          property. It looks like privacy may be a problem with the location,
          which landscaping could improve.

          The front porch is very unusual and seems to have some story to tell.
          Is that indoor-outdoor carpet covering the porch? The front iron
          columns are probably original to house or part of an early renovation.
          Notice how they don't match the faux-italian columns at the back of
          the porch? Why would someone put those on the back and not replace or
          put surrounds in the front to match? Perhaps the open frame ironwork
          had another purpose, like hanging decorations. Porches with no hand
          rail aren't intended to be functional and I don't think this ever had
          them -at least not since a first incarnation. Yet this porch seems to
          be used more than is typical. Like it was a local gathering place, a
          place for the local queen bee to hold court, or a place to use as a
          showcase stage for elaborate holiday decorations.

          I agree with you that there isn't too much you can do with this beyond
          the exterior. However, if the interior is in need of renovation you
          could do a lot of upgrades in terms of adjustments to the room
          partitions and more appropriate materials; bamboo and cork flooring,
          alternative wall coverings, greener cabinetry, new insulation like soy-
          based polyurethane foam, etc. And with plumbing and heating you can
          look at things like hydronic radiant heating, shower water diverters
          (stores the cold water from a shower as it heats up to be used
          elsewhere), integral graywater reutilization (which can use graywater
          to flush toilets and water the garden) and things like this. Lighting
          upgrades to such things as LED or fiber optic lighting and the use of
          sun tube skylights are another option. I suspect this house as a lot
          of persistently dark corners and stairwells. That may be the extent of
          it, though.

          Use of virtual video window-walls would be interesting but difficult
          to integrate into the kind of construction this house uses with such
          small spaces. You're basically limited to rear projection displays for
          this technology today which means you need at least a meter of space
          behind a wall to mount the necessary equipment. That kind of
          experiment is better suited to newly built housing where this can be
          accommodated in the original design. I think a smarter option is to
          adjust the landscaping of the site to provide more boundary privacy
          and open up some of the sides of the house with some nice new tall
          windows or translucent wall paneling.

          Claytronics is probably not going to realize anything anyone can
          actually use for anything for the next 40 years. It's a very nascent
          concept and not much more. When it does realize something in the
          future, it will open the possibilities for a lot of interesting home
          decor novelties -wall art and sculpture that morphs on demand- but
          most of its practical uses would be in the realm of communications,
          computer user interfacing, and toys. It will be many decades more
          before it may be able to do things like create resilient structures
          such as furniture and buildings on-demand.

          If you want to do something really novel from an environmental
          standpoint but don't have a huge budget, let me share with you a
          housing concept I have been planning to use for myself for some time
          now. have a look here;

          http://www.poligon.com/pages/shelters.htm

          These are prefabricated steel park shelters. They are strong, simple,
          assembled in days, and they're relatively cheap on a per-square-foot
          basis. Pay particular attention to the rectangular designs.

          Now, have a look at this;

          http://z.about.com/d/architecture/1/0/B/l/glasshouse.jpg

          This is Phillip Johnson's Glass House in New Canaan Connecticut. Built
          in 1949, it was the famous architect's own home until his death at the
          turn of the 20th century.

          Over my long search for the most practical way to build non-toxic
          housing, I searched for a strategy for building homes that reduced a
          house to as few a number of non-toxic materials as possible, could
          minimize construction labor as much as possible, and not compromise
          standard of living in order to do those things. When I found the Glass
          House I realized I was on the right track to that. However, architects
          are like the diabolical elf Rumplestiltskin. They have the magical
          ability to turn even straw bale into gold. If one tried to clone
          Johnson's Glass House today, using the techniques of construction he
          used in 1949, it could cost a couple million dollars! But then I found
          those park shelters and I realized one could make pretty much the same
          thing from those enclosed with commercial minimal-framing window
          systems. One could build an ultra-Modernist home at LESS cost than any
          conventional house. All one needed to do was fashion a concrete slab
          with radiant heating and utilities runs through it, surround it in a
          'moat' of river stone to make a drainage system, put one of these
          larger shelters on top of it, erect the commercial windows with all
          clear or a combination of clear, translucent, and opaque panels, put
          in a suspended ceiling system with tracks for curtains or Japanese
          screens, and then build an interior enclosure for the bathroom leaving
          the rest of the space open-plan. A second shelter could provide you
          with a car shelter and utility shed. Many other in-fill wall options
          are possible, such as using straw bale, adobe, stacked stone,
          commercial hanging wall systems, whatever. You can use whatever you
          like because it doesn't need to be load-bearing. And you can use more
          conventional interior partitioning with the usual built-up stud walls.
          But the clear span of the shelters made open-plan designs the most
          practical. Most of the cost of a home is in the labor for interior
          finishing. But with this interior finishing is reduced to primarily a
          choice of furniture. Essentially, this is a free-standing loft
          apartment. When I contacted this particular shelter manufacturer, I
          learned some people had already dome this same idea using their
          shelters.

          Now, this strategy isn't suited to all locations. Obviously, this
          would never work in a location like the house you had pictures of. It
          demands enough property to allow the landscape to provide a level of
          privacy the structure itself doesn't. You lose some of the economy in
          the cost of added land. And an all-open-plan house is not exactly
          conducive to a home with a lot of children, or a lot of people in
          general. But it's cheap, simple, non-toxic, and it offers the prospect
          of a good test-bed for a lot of sustainable and alternative energy
          technology that also looks very sophisticated. The contiguous roof
          area you can put to solar use is vast. The concrete slab deck area is
          free to integrate things like living machine graywater gardens,
          container farming, pools and ponds, and the like. Wind turbines would
          look elegant adjacent to it. You get away with using all kinds of low-
          impact interior materials that are harder to make work in a more
          conventional structure. And the impact it would have on the natural
          landscape would be minimal compared to conventional homes. Because the
          interior is so freely adapted, you can install all sorts of things
          that aren't practical in a conventional home. Indoor hydroponics,
          water-walls, elaborate computer system racks, floor-to-ceiling video
          displays, floor-to-ceiling free-standing shelving, textile partitions,
          hanging aquariums, you name it. Any domestic technology present or
          future can be quickly integrated without radical renovation. And
          nothing need be permanent, which suits the need for spontaneous
          adaptability with contemporary living. Until I learned of the T-Slot
          framing for housing, this was what I considered the closest thing to a
          'real' 21st century home. The closest a house can get to being like a
          computer.

          Eric Hunting
          erichunting@...



          On Sep 3, 2008, at 12:13 PM, Luf-team@yahoogroups.com wrote:

          > what im looking into doing in my realestate dealings
          > Posted by: "rward8" rward8@... rward8Tue Sep 2, 2008 2:47 pm
          > (PDT)
          >
          > My though's on what im doing in houseing
          >
          > Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any comments
          > about it. First the outside of the building As you can see from the
          > pictures.
          >
          > It not a very big house and it is under 50K to buy it. As for the roof
          > im thinking about putting in about 20K solor singles in on the whole
          > roof and the garage in the back.
          >
          > Im not sure what else I would do to the property beyond that on the
          > outside.
          >
          > Now for stuff that moves beyond normal for a house any that I know of.
          >
          > I had this idea to cover a part of the house like two rooms on the
          > outside wall with small camra maybe even the siding itself. On the
          > inside would be something that would trigger the wall to seem to
          > vanish
          > as if you where looking outside. The main reason why I would even try
          > this is because that one step closer to having a lcd wall.
          >
          > Another crazy idea I had was what I could do next after everthing
          > above.
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao
          > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao>
          > Claytronics which is small computer's that can rearange
          > themselves's I would like too see that in housing of some sort
          > although a lot of testing would have too be done as well.
        • rward8
          the only problem i have with the house is like of pivercy and your right on avg most of the houses in hamilton ohio are like that we are talking about shotgun
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 11, 2008
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            the only problem i have with the house is like of pivercy and your
            right on avg most of the houses in hamilton ohio are like that we are
            talking about shotgun houses, some victorion houses but not many.




            --- In luf-team@yahoogroups.com, Eric Hunting <erichunting@...> wrote:
            >
            > Looking at the photos, I can see there is not much you can
            radically
            > do to such a home in terms of structure. There's a lot of
            potential
            > surface renovation but it also looks like it's in generally good
            shape
            > and, outside of trying to make some kind of demonstration home or
            > performing upgrades to reduce latent toxicity, it's not
            necessarily
            > logical to replace functional stuff with new stuff just because
            the
            > new stuff is labeled green.
            >
            > It looks to me like this house was built in the early 1950s and
            has
            > seen two or three cycles of renovation, with the last within the
            last
            > 5 years and on a low budget. The back room is a late addition,
            > probably produced by converting an open porch into, most likely, a
            > laundry room and/or mother-in-law suite. It may have been used as
            a
            > rental apartment.
            >
            > The roof line of the house and close spacing of the neighborhood
            are
            > very problematic. (the area looked a lot like New Jersey to me...)
            > Though the addition of solar shingles is a very good idea, there
            just
            > is not going to be enough roof area in any one direction for solar
            > power to function effectively. I would think the utility shed is
            > probably better suited to adding solar than the main house is but
            > there may be enough area for a supplemental solar water heater
            panel
            > on some south-facing side of the house. If the area suits it, a
            small
            > wind turbine might be something to consider too, though you are in
            a
            > very dense suburban neighborhood and it would need to be one of
            the
            > more discreet vertical type to not annoy neighbors.
            >
            > The back yard would be well suited to a victory garden and some
            > creative landscaping work and I would put a lot into that. It has
            > potential to be a real haven. I don't know what the interior layout
            is
            > like, but the design of the rear extension looks atrocious, though
            it
            > may have been a concession to stuff on the left hand side of the
            > property. It looks like privacy may be a problem with the
            location,
            > which landscaping could improve.
            >
            > The front porch is very unusual and seems to have some story to
            tell.
            > Is that indoor-outdoor carpet covering the porch? The front iron
            > columns are probably original to house or part of an early
            renovation.
            > Notice how they don't match the faux-italian columns at the back
            of
            > the porch? Why would someone put those on the back and not replace
            or
            > put surrounds in the front to match? Perhaps the open frame
            ironwork
            > had another purpose, like hanging decorations. Porches with no
            hand
            > rail aren't intended to be functional and I don't think this ever
            had
            > them -at least not since a first incarnation. Yet this porch seems
            to
            > be used more than is typical. Like it was a local gathering place,
            a
            > place for the local queen bee to hold court, or a place to use as
            a
            > showcase stage for elaborate holiday decorations.
            >
            > I agree with you that there isn't too much you can do with this
            beyond
            > the exterior. However, if the interior is in need of renovation
            you
            > could do a lot of upgrades in terms of adjustments to the room
            > partitions and more appropriate materials; bamboo and cork
            flooring,
            > alternative wall coverings, greener cabinetry, new insulation like
            soy-
            > based polyurethane foam, etc. And with plumbing and heating you
            can
            > look at things like hydronic radiant heating, shower water
            diverters
            > (stores the cold water from a shower as it heats up to be used
            > elsewhere), integral graywater reutilization (which can use
            graywater
            > to flush toilets and water the garden) and things like this.
            Lighting
            > upgrades to such things as LED or fiber optic lighting and the use
            of
            > sun tube skylights are another option. I suspect this house as a
            lot
            > of persistently dark corners and stairwells. That may be the extent
            of
            > it, though.
            >
            > Use of virtual video window-walls would be interesting but
            difficult
            > to integrate into the kind of construction this house uses with
            such
            > small spaces. You're basically limited to rear projection displays
            for
            > this technology today which means you need at least a meter of
            space
            > behind a wall to mount the necessary equipment. That kind of
            > experiment is better suited to newly built housing where this can
            be
            > accommodated in the original design. I think a smarter option is
            to
            > adjust the landscaping of the site to provide more boundary
            privacy
            > and open up some of the sides of the house with some nice new tall
            > windows or translucent wall paneling.
            >
            > Claytronics is probably not going to realize anything anyone can
            > actually use for anything for the next 40 years. It's a very
            nascent
            > concept and not much more. When it does realize something in the
            > future, it will open the possibilities for a lot of interesting
            home
            > decor novelties -wall art and sculpture that morphs on demand- but
            > most of its practical uses would be in the realm of
            communications,
            > computer user interfacing, and toys. It will be many decades more
            > before it may be able to do things like create resilient
            structures
            > such as furniture and buildings on-demand.
            >
            > If you want to do something really novel from an environmental
            > standpoint but don't have a huge budget, let me share with you a
            > housing concept I have been planning to use for myself for some
            time
            > now. have a look here;
            >
            > http://www.poligon.com/pages/shelters.htm
            >
            > These are prefabricated steel park shelters. They are strong,
            simple,
            > assembled in days, and they're relatively cheap on a per-square-
            foot
            > basis. Pay particular attention to the rectangular designs.
            >
            > Now, have a look at this;
            >
            > http://z.about.com/d/architecture/1/0/B/l/glasshouse.jpg
            >
            > This is Phillip Johnson's Glass House in New Canaan Connecticut.
            Built
            > in 1949, it was the famous architect's own home until his death at
            the
            > turn of the 20th century.
            >
            > Over my long search for the most practical way to build non-toxic
            > housing, I searched for a strategy for building homes that reduced
            a
            > house to as few a number of non-toxic materials as possible, could
            > minimize construction labor as much as possible, and not
            compromise
            > standard of living in order to do those things. When I found the
            Glass
            > House I realized I was on the right track to that. However,
            architects
            > are like the diabolical elf Rumplestiltskin. They have the magical
            > ability to turn even straw bale into gold. If one tried to clone
            > Johnson's Glass House today, using the techniques of construction
            he
            > used in 1949, it could cost a couple million dollars! But then I
            found
            > those park shelters and I realized one could make pretty much the
            same
            > thing from those enclosed with commercial minimal-framing window
            > systems. One could build an ultra-Modernist home at LESS cost than
            any
            > conventional house. All one needed to do was fashion a concrete
            slab
            > with radiant heating and utilities runs through it, surround it in
            a
            > 'moat' of river stone to make a drainage system, put one of these
            > larger shelters on top of it, erect the commercial windows with
            all
            > clear or a combination of clear, translucent, and opaque panels,
            put
            > in a suspended ceiling system with tracks for curtains or Japanese
            > screens, and then build an interior enclosure for the bathroom
            leaving
            > the rest of the space open-plan. A second shelter could provide
            you
            > with a car shelter and utility shed. Many other in-fill wall
            options
            > are possible, such as using straw bale, adobe, stacked stone,
            > commercial hanging wall systems, whatever. You can use whatever
            you
            > like because it doesn't need to be load-bearing. And you can use
            more
            > conventional interior partitioning with the usual built-up stud
            walls.
            > But the clear span of the shelters made open-plan designs the most
            > practical. Most of the cost of a home is in the labor for interior
            > finishing. But with this interior finishing is reduced to primarily
            a
            > choice of furniture. Essentially, this is a free-standing loft
            > apartment. When I contacted this particular shelter manufacturer,
            I
            > learned some people had already dome this same idea using their
            > shelters.
            >
            > Now, this strategy isn't suited to all locations. Obviously, this
            > would never work in a location like the house you had pictures of.
            It
            > demands enough property to allow the landscape to provide a level
            of
            > privacy the structure itself doesn't. You lose some of the economy
            in
            > the cost of added land. And an all-open-plan house is not exactly
            > conducive to a home with a lot of children, or a lot of people in
            > general. But it's cheap, simple, non-toxic, and it offers the
            prospect
            > of a good test-bed for a lot of sustainable and alternative energy
            > technology that also looks very sophisticated. The contiguous roof
            > area you can put to solar use is vast. The concrete slab deck area
            is
            > free to integrate things like living machine graywater gardens,
            > container farming, pools and ponds, and the like. Wind turbines
            would
            > look elegant adjacent to it. You get away with using all kinds of
            low-
            > impact interior materials that are harder to make work in a more
            > conventional structure. And the impact it would have on the
            natural
            > landscape would be minimal compared to conventional homes. Because
            the
            > interior is so freely adapted, you can install all sorts of things
            > that aren't practical in a conventional home. Indoor hydroponics,
            > water-walls, elaborate computer system racks, floor-to-ceiling
            video
            > displays, floor-to-ceiling free-standing shelving, textile
            partitions,
            > hanging aquariums, you name it. Any domestic technology present or
            > future can be quickly integrated without radical renovation. And
            > nothing need be permanent, which suits the need for spontaneous
            > adaptability with contemporary living. Until I learned of the T-
            Slot
            > framing for housing, this was what I considered the closest thing
            to a
            > 'real' 21st century home. The closest a house can get to being like
            a
            > computer.
            >
            > Eric Hunting
            > erichunting@...
            >
            >
            >
            > On Sep 3, 2008, at 12:13 PM, Luf-team@yahoogroups.com wrote:
            >
            > > what im looking into doing in my realestate dealings
            > > Posted by: "rward8" rward8@... rward8Tue Sep 2, 2008 2:47 pm
            > > (PDT)
            > >
            > > My though's on what im doing in houseing
            > >
            > > Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any
            comments
            > > about it. First the outside of the building As you can see from
            the
            > > pictures.
            > >
            > > It not a very big house and it is under 50K to buy it. As for the
            roof
            > > im thinking about putting in about 20K solor singles in on the
            whole
            > > roof and the garage in the back.
            > >
            > > Im not sure what else I would do to the property beyond that on
            the
            > > outside.
            > >
            > > Now for stuff that moves beyond normal for a house any that I
            know of.
            > >
            > > I had this idea to cover a part of the house like two rooms on the
            > > outside wall with small camra maybe even the siding itself. On the
            > > inside would be something that would trigger the wall to seem to
            > > vanish
            > > as if you where looking outside. The main reason why I would even
            try
            > > this is because that one step closer to having a lcd wall.
            > >
            > > Another crazy idea I had was what I could do next after
            everthing
            > > above.
            > >
            > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao
            > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao>
            > > Claytronics which is small computer's that can rearange
            > > themselves's I would like too see that in housing of some sort
            > > although a lot of testing would have too be done as well.
            >
          • Raymond Hicks
            I m not sure how many of you guys know of it, but zillow.com will give you some excellent resource information of many addresses including year it was built,
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 12, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              I'm not sure how many of you guys know of it, but zillow.com will give
              you some excellent resource information of many addresses including
              year it was built, sq. footage, # rooms, heating and cooling, etc.

              On 9/10/08, Eric Hunting <erichunting@...> wrote:
              > Looking at the photos, I can see there is not much you can radically
              > do to such a home in terms of structure. There's a lot of potential
              > surface renovation but it also looks like it's in generally good shape
              > and, outside of trying to make some kind of demonstration home or
              > performing upgrades to reduce latent toxicity, it's not necessarily
              > logical to replace functional stuff with new stuff just because the
              > new stuff is labeled green.
              >
              > It looks to me like this house was built in the early 1950s and has
              > seen two or three cycles of renovation, with the last within the last
              > 5 years and on a low budget. The back room is a late addition,
              > probably produced by converting an open porch into, most likely, a
              > laundry room and/or mother-in-law suite. It may have been used as a
              > rental apartment.
              >
              > The roof line of the house and close spacing of the neighborhood are
              > very problematic. (the area looked a lot like New Jersey to me...)
              > Though the addition of solar shingles is a very good idea, there just
              > is not going to be enough roof area in any one direction for solar
              > power to function effectively. I would think the utility shed is
              > probably better suited to adding solar than the main house is but
              > there may be enough area for a supplemental solar water heater panel
              > on some south-facing side of the house. If the area suits it, a small
              > wind turbine might be something to consider too, though you are in a
              > very dense suburban neighborhood and it would need to be one of the
              > more discreet vertical type to not annoy neighbors.
              >
              > The back yard would be well suited to a victory garden and some
              > creative landscaping work and I would put a lot into that. It has
              > potential to be a real haven. I don't know what the interior layout is
              > like, but the design of the rear extension looks atrocious, though it
              > may have been a concession to stuff on the left hand side of the
              > property. It looks like privacy may be a problem with the location,
              > which landscaping could improve.
              >
              > The front porch is very unusual and seems to have some story to tell.
              > Is that indoor-outdoor carpet covering the porch? The front iron
              > columns are probably original to house or part of an early renovation.
              > Notice how they don't match the faux-italian columns at the back of
              > the porch? Why would someone put those on the back and not replace or
              > put surrounds in the front to match? Perhaps the open frame ironwork
              > had another purpose, like hanging decorations. Porches with no hand
              > rail aren't intended to be functional and I don't think this ever had
              > them -at least not since a first incarnation. Yet this porch seems to
              > be used more than is typical. Like it was a local gathering place, a
              > place for the local queen bee to hold court, or a place to use as a
              > showcase stage for elaborate holiday decorations.
              >
              > I agree with you that there isn't too much you can do with this beyond
              > the exterior. However, if the interior is in need of renovation you
              > could do a lot of upgrades in terms of adjustments to the room
              > partitions and more appropriate materials; bamboo and cork flooring,
              > alternative wall coverings, greener cabinetry, new insulation like soy-
              > based polyurethane foam, etc. And with plumbing and heating you can
              > look at things like hydronic radiant heating, shower water diverters
              > (stores the cold water from a shower as it heats up to be used
              > elsewhere), integral graywater reutilization (which can use graywater
              > to flush toilets and water the garden) and things like this. Lighting
              > upgrades to such things as LED or fiber optic lighting and the use of
              > sun tube skylights are another option. I suspect this house as a lot
              > of persistently dark corners and stairwells. That may be the extent of
              > it, though.
              >
              > Use of virtual video window-walls would be interesting but difficult
              > to integrate into the kind of construction this house uses with such
              > small spaces. You're basically limited to rear projection displays for
              > this technology today which means you need at least a meter of space
              > behind a wall to mount the necessary equipment. That kind of
              > experiment is better suited to newly built housing where this can be
              > accommodated in the original design. I think a smarter option is to
              > adjust the landscaping of the site to provide more boundary privacy
              > and open up some of the sides of the house with some nice new tall
              > windows or translucent wall paneling.
              >
              > Claytronics is probably not going to realize anything anyone can
              > actually use for anything for the next 40 years. It's a very nascent
              > concept and not much more. When it does realize something in the
              > future, it will open the possibilities for a lot of interesting home
              > decor novelties -wall art and sculpture that morphs on demand- but
              > most of its practical uses would be in the realm of communications,
              > computer user interfacing, and toys. It will be many decades more
              > before it may be able to do things like create resilient structures
              > such as furniture and buildings on-demand.
              >
              > If you want to do something really novel from an environmental
              > standpoint but don't have a huge budget, let me share with you a
              > housing concept I have been planning to use for myself for some time
              > now. have a look here;
              >
              > http://www.poligon.com/pages/shelters.htm
              >
              > These are prefabricated steel park shelters. They are strong, simple,
              > assembled in days, and they're relatively cheap on a per-square-foot
              > basis. Pay particular attention to the rectangular designs.
              >
              > Now, have a look at this;
              >
              > http://z.about.com/d/architecture/1/0/B/l/glasshouse.jpg
              >
              > This is Phillip Johnson's Glass House in New Canaan Connecticut. Built
              > in 1949, it was the famous architect's own home until his death at the
              > turn of the 20th century.
              >
              > Over my long search for the most practical way to build non-toxic
              > housing, I searched for a strategy for building homes that reduced a
              > house to as few a number of non-toxic materials as possible, could
              > minimize construction labor as much as possible, and not compromise
              > standard of living in order to do those things. When I found the Glass
              > House I realized I was on the right track to that. However, architects
              > are like the diabolical elf Rumplestiltskin. They have the magical
              > ability to turn even straw bale into gold. If one tried to clone
              > Johnson's Glass House today, using the techniques of construction he
              > used in 1949, it could cost a couple million dollars! But then I found
              > those park shelters and I realized one could make pretty much the same
              > thing from those enclosed with commercial minimal-framing window
              > systems. One could build an ultra-Modernist home at LESS cost than any
              > conventional house. All one needed to do was fashion a concrete slab
              > with radiant heating and utilities runs through it, surround it in a
              > 'moat' of river stone to make a drainage system, put one of these
              > larger shelters on top of it, erect the commercial windows with all
              > clear or a combination of clear, translucent, and opaque panels, put
              > in a suspended ceiling system with tracks for curtains or Japanese
              > screens, and then build an interior enclosure for the bathroom leaving
              > the rest of the space open-plan. A second shelter could provide you
              > with a car shelter and utility shed. Many other in-fill wall options
              > are possible, such as using straw bale, adobe, stacked stone,
              > commercial hanging wall systems, whatever. You can use whatever you
              > like because it doesn't need to be load-bearing. And you can use more
              > conventional interior partitioning with the usual built-up stud walls.
              > But the clear span of the shelters made open-plan designs the most
              > practical. Most of the cost of a home is in the labor for interior
              > finishing. But with this interior finishing is reduced to primarily a
              > choice of furniture. Essentially, this is a free-standing loft
              > apartment. When I contacted this particular shelter manufacturer, I
              > learned some people had already dome this same idea using their
              > shelters.
              >
              > Now, this strategy isn't suited to all locations. Obviously, this
              > would never work in a location like the house you had pictures of. It
              > demands enough property to allow the landscape to provide a level of
              > privacy the structure itself doesn't. You lose some of the economy in
              > the cost of added land. And an all-open-plan house is not exactly
              > conducive to a home with a lot of children, or a lot of people in
              > general. But it's cheap, simple, non-toxic, and it offers the prospect
              > of a good test-bed for a lot of sustainable and alternative energy
              > technology that also looks very sophisticated. The contiguous roof
              > area you can put to solar use is vast. The concrete slab deck area is
              > free to integrate things like living machine graywater gardens,
              > container farming, pools and ponds, and the like. Wind turbines would
              > look elegant adjacent to it. You get away with using all kinds of low-
              > impact interior materials that are harder to make work in a more
              > conventional structure. And the impact it would have on the natural
              > landscape would be minimal compared to conventional homes. Because the
              > interior is so freely adapted, you can install all sorts of things
              > that aren't practical in a conventional home. Indoor hydroponics,
              > water-walls, elaborate computer system racks, floor-to-ceiling video
              > displays, floor-to-ceiling free-standing shelving, textile partitions,
              > hanging aquariums, you name it. Any domestic technology present or
              > future can be quickly integrated without radical renovation. And
              > nothing need be permanent, which suits the need for spontaneous
              > adaptability with contemporary living. Until I learned of the T-Slot
              > framing for housing, this was what I considered the closest thing to a
              > 'real' 21st century home. The closest a house can get to being like a
              > computer.
              >
              > Eric Hunting
              > erichunting@...
              >
              >
              >
              > On Sep 3, 2008, at 12:13 PM, Luf-team@yahoogroups.com wrote:
              >
              >> what im looking into doing in my realestate dealings
              >> Posted by: "rward8" rward8@... rward8Tue Sep 2, 2008 2:47 pm
              >> (PDT)
              >>
              >> My though's on what im doing in houseing
              >>
              >> Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any comments
              >> about it. First the outside of the building As you can see from the
              >> pictures.
              >>
              >> It not a very big house and it is under 50K to buy it. As for the roof
              >> im thinking about putting in about 20K solor singles in on the whole
              >> roof and the garage in the back.
              >>
              >> Im not sure what else I would do to the property beyond that on the
              >> outside.
              >>
              >> Now for stuff that moves beyond normal for a house any that I know of.
              >>
              >> I had this idea to cover a part of the house like two rooms on the
              >> outside wall with small camra maybe even the siding itself. On the
              >> inside would be something that would trigger the wall to seem to
              >> vanish
              >> as if you where looking outside. The main reason why I would even try
              >> this is because that one step closer to having a lcd wall.
              >>
              >> Another crazy idea I had was what I could do next after everthing
              >> above.
              >>
              >> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao
              >> <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao>
              >> Claytronics which is small computer's that can rearange
              >> themselves's I would like too see that in housing of some sort
              >> although a lot of testing would have too be done as well.
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > ______________________________________________________________________
              >
              > Don't forget to visit these LUF Sites!
              > LUF Team http://groups.yahoo.com/group/luf-team/
              > LUF Home http://www.luf.org/
              > LUF Website http://groups.yahoo.com/group/luf-website/
              >
              > Other sites:
              > OTEC News http://www.otecnews.org/
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >

              --
              Sent from Gmail for mobile | mobile.google.com

              Raymond Hicks
              ----------------------
              Would you do it with me
              Heal the scars and change the stars
              Would you do it for me
              Turn loose the heaven within
              (\__/)
              (='.'=)This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
              (")_(")signature to help him gain world domination.
            • rward8
              cool thx ... give ... radically ... potential ... shape ... necessarily ... the ... has ... last ... a ... are ... just ... panel ... small ... in a ... the
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 13, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                cool thx

                --- In luf-team@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond Hicks" <zephris@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'm not sure how many of you guys know of it, but zillow.com will
                give
                > you some excellent resource information of many addresses including
                > year it was built, sq. footage, # rooms, heating and cooling, etc.
                >
                > On 9/10/08, Eric Hunting <erichunting@...> wrote:
                > > Looking at the photos, I can see there is not much you can
                radically
                > > do to such a home in terms of structure. There's a lot of
                potential
                > > surface renovation but it also looks like it's in generally good
                shape
                > > and, outside of trying to make some kind of demonstration home or
                > > performing upgrades to reduce latent toxicity, it's not
                necessarily
                > > logical to replace functional stuff with new stuff just because
                the
                > > new stuff is labeled green.
                > >
                > > It looks to me like this house was built in the early 1950s and
                has
                > > seen two or three cycles of renovation, with the last within the
                last
                > > 5 years and on a low budget. The back room is a late addition,
                > > probably produced by converting an open porch into, most likely, a
                > > laundry room and/or mother-in-law suite. It may have been used as
                a
                > > rental apartment.
                > >
                > > The roof line of the house and close spacing of the neighborhood
                are
                > > very problematic. (the area looked a lot like New Jersey to me...)
                > > Though the addition of solar shingles is a very good idea, there
                just
                > > is not going to be enough roof area in any one direction for solar
                > > power to function effectively. I would think the utility shed is
                > > probably better suited to adding solar than the main house is but
                > > there may be enough area for a supplemental solar water heater
                panel
                > > on some south-facing side of the house. If the area suits it, a
                small
                > > wind turbine might be something to consider too, though you are
                in a
                > > very dense suburban neighborhood and it would need to be one of
                the
                > > more discreet vertical type to not annoy neighbors.
                > >
                > > The back yard would be well suited to a victory garden and some
                > > creative landscaping work and I would put a lot into that. It has
                > > potential to be a real haven. I don't know what the interior
                layout is
                > > like, but the design of the rear extension looks atrocious,
                though it
                > > may have been a concession to stuff on the left hand side of the
                > > property. It looks like privacy may be a problem with the
                location,
                > > which landscaping could improve.
                > >
                > > The front porch is very unusual and seems to have some story to
                tell.
                > > Is that indoor-outdoor carpet covering the porch? The front iron
                > > columns are probably original to house or part of an early
                renovation.
                > > Notice how they don't match the faux-italian columns at the back
                of
                > > the porch? Why would someone put those on the back and not
                replace or
                > > put surrounds in the front to match? Perhaps the open frame
                ironwork
                > > had another purpose, like hanging decorations. Porches with no
                hand
                > > rail aren't intended to be functional and I don't think this ever
                had
                > > them -at least not since a first incarnation. Yet this porch
                seems to
                > > be used more than is typical. Like it was a local gathering
                place, a
                > > place for the local queen bee to hold court, or a place to use as
                a
                > > showcase stage for elaborate holiday decorations.
                > >
                > > I agree with you that there isn't too much you can do with this
                beyond
                > > the exterior. However, if the interior is in need of renovation
                you
                > > could do a lot of upgrades in terms of adjustments to the room
                > > partitions and more appropriate materials; bamboo and cork
                flooring,
                > > alternative wall coverings, greener cabinetry, new insulation
                like soy-
                > > based polyurethane foam, etc. And with plumbing and heating you
                can
                > > look at things like hydronic radiant heating, shower water
                diverters
                > > (stores the cold water from a shower as it heats up to be used
                > > elsewhere), integral graywater reutilization (which can use
                graywater
                > > to flush toilets and water the garden) and things like this.
                Lighting
                > > upgrades to such things as LED or fiber optic lighting and the
                use of
                > > sun tube skylights are another option. I suspect this house as a
                lot
                > > of persistently dark corners and stairwells. That may be the
                extent of
                > > it, though.
                > >
                > > Use of virtual video window-walls would be interesting but
                difficult
                > > to integrate into the kind of construction this house uses with
                such
                > > small spaces. You're basically limited to rear projection
                displays for
                > > this technology today which means you need at least a meter of
                space
                > > behind a wall to mount the necessary equipment. That kind of
                > > experiment is better suited to newly built housing where this can
                be
                > > accommodated in the original design. I think a smarter option is
                to
                > > adjust the landscaping of the site to provide more boundary
                privacy
                > > and open up some of the sides of the house with some nice new tall
                > > windows or translucent wall paneling.
                > >
                > > Claytronics is probably not going to realize anything anyone can
                > > actually use for anything for the next 40 years. It's a very
                nascent
                > > concept and not much more. When it does realize something in the
                > > future, it will open the possibilities for a lot of interesting
                home
                > > decor novelties -wall art and sculpture that morphs on demand- but
                > > most of its practical uses would be in the realm of
                communications,
                > > computer user interfacing, and toys. It will be many decades more
                > > before it may be able to do things like create resilient
                structures
                > > such as furniture and buildings on-demand.
                > >
                > > If you want to do something really novel from an environmental
                > > standpoint but don't have a huge budget, let me share with you a
                > > housing concept I have been planning to use for myself for some
                time
                > > now. have a look here;
                > >
                > > http://www.poligon.com/pages/shelters.htm
                > >
                > > These are prefabricated steel park shelters. They are strong,
                simple,
                > > assembled in days, and they're relatively cheap on a per-square-
                foot
                > > basis. Pay particular attention to the rectangular designs.
                > >
                > > Now, have a look at this;
                > >
                > > http://z.about.com/d/architecture/1/0/B/l/glasshouse.jpg
                > >
                > > This is Phillip Johnson's Glass House in New Canaan Connecticut.
                Built
                > > in 1949, it was the famous architect's own home until his death
                at the
                > > turn of the 20th century.
                > >
                > > Over my long search for the most practical way to build non-toxic
                > > housing, I searched for a strategy for building homes that
                reduced a
                > > house to as few a number of non-toxic materials as possible, could
                > > minimize construction labor as much as possible, and not
                compromise
                > > standard of living in order to do those things. When I found the
                Glass
                > > House I realized I was on the right track to that. However,
                architects
                > > are like the diabolical elf Rumplestiltskin. They have the magical
                > > ability to turn even straw bale into gold. If one tried to clone
                > > Johnson's Glass House today, using the techniques of construction
                he
                > > used in 1949, it could cost a couple million dollars! But then I
                found
                > > those park shelters and I realized one could make pretty much the
                same
                > > thing from those enclosed with commercial minimal-framing window
                > > systems. One could build an ultra-Modernist home at LESS cost
                than any
                > > conventional house. All one needed to do was fashion a concrete
                slab
                > > with radiant heating and utilities runs through it, surround it
                in a
                > > 'moat' of river stone to make a drainage system, put one of these
                > > larger shelters on top of it, erect the commercial windows with
                all
                > > clear or a combination of clear, translucent, and opaque panels,
                put
                > > in a suspended ceiling system with tracks for curtains or Japanese
                > > screens, and then build an interior enclosure for the bathroom
                leaving
                > > the rest of the space open-plan. A second shelter could provide
                you
                > > with a car shelter and utility shed. Many other in-fill wall
                options
                > > are possible, such as using straw bale, adobe, stacked stone,
                > > commercial hanging wall systems, whatever. You can use whatever
                you
                > > like because it doesn't need to be load-bearing. And you can use
                more
                > > conventional interior partitioning with the usual built-up stud
                walls.
                > > But the clear span of the shelters made open-plan designs the most
                > > practical. Most of the cost of a home is in the labor for interior
                > > finishing. But with this interior finishing is reduced to
                primarily a
                > > choice of furniture. Essentially, this is a free-standing loft
                > > apartment. When I contacted this particular shelter manufacturer,
                I
                > > learned some people had already dome this same idea using their
                > > shelters.
                > >
                > > Now, this strategy isn't suited to all locations. Obviously, this
                > > would never work in a location like the house you had pictures
                of. It
                > > demands enough property to allow the landscape to provide a level
                of
                > > privacy the structure itself doesn't. You lose some of the
                economy in
                > > the cost of added land. And an all-open-plan house is not exactly
                > > conducive to a home with a lot of children, or a lot of people in
                > > general. But it's cheap, simple, non-toxic, and it offers the
                prospect
                > > of a good test-bed for a lot of sustainable and alternative energy
                > > technology that also looks very sophisticated. The contiguous roof
                > > area you can put to solar use is vast. The concrete slab deck
                area is
                > > free to integrate things like living machine graywater gardens,
                > > container farming, pools and ponds, and the like. Wind turbines
                would
                > > look elegant adjacent to it. You get away with using all kinds of
                low-
                > > impact interior materials that are harder to make work in a more
                > > conventional structure. And the impact it would have on the
                natural
                > > landscape would be minimal compared to conventional homes.
                Because the
                > > interior is so freely adapted, you can install all sorts of things
                > > that aren't practical in a conventional home. Indoor hydroponics,
                > > water-walls, elaborate computer system racks, floor-to-ceiling
                video
                > > displays, floor-to-ceiling free-standing shelving, textile
                partitions,
                > > hanging aquariums, you name it. Any domestic technology present or
                > > future can be quickly integrated without radical renovation. And
                > > nothing need be permanent, which suits the need for spontaneous
                > > adaptability with contemporary living. Until I learned of the T-
                Slot
                > > framing for housing, this was what I considered the closest thing
                to a
                > > 'real' 21st century home. The closest a house can get to being
                like a
                > > computer.
                > >
                > > Eric Hunting
                > > erichunting@...
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > On Sep 3, 2008, at 12:13 PM, Luf-team@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                > >
                > >> what im looking into doing in my realestate dealings
                > >> Posted by: "rward8" rward8@... rward8Tue Sep 2, 2008 2:47 pm
                > >> (PDT)
                > >>
                > >> My though's on what im doing in houseing
                > >>
                > >> Thank you for taking the time to read them and posting any
                comments
                > >> about it. First the outside of the building As you can see from
                the
                > >> pictures.
                > >>
                > >> It not a very big house and it is under 50K to buy it. As for
                the roof
                > >> im thinking about putting in about 20K solor singles in on the
                whole
                > >> roof and the garage in the back.
                > >>
                > >> Im not sure what else I would do to the property beyond that on
                the
                > >> outside.
                > >>
                > >> Now for stuff that moves beyond normal for a house any that I
                know of.
                > >>
                > >> I had this idea to cover a part of the house like two rooms on
                the
                > >> outside wall with small camra maybe even the siding itself. On
                the
                > >> inside would be something that would trigger the wall to seem to
                > >> vanish
                > >> as if you where looking outside. The main reason why I would
                even try
                > >> this is because that one step closer to having a lcd wall.
                > >>
                > >> Another crazy idea I had was what I could do next after everthing
                > >> above.
                > >>
                > >> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao
                > >> <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaqzOUv2Ao>
                > >> Claytronics which is small computer's that can rearange
                > >> themselves's I would like too see that in housing of some sort
                > >> although a lot of testing would have too be done as well.
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > >
                ______________________________________________________________________
                > >
                > > Don't forget to visit these LUF Sites!
                > > LUF Team http://groups.yahoo.com/group/luf-team/
                > > LUF Home http://www.luf.org/
                > > LUF Website http://groups.yahoo.com/group/luf-website/
                > >
                > > Other sites:
                > > OTEC News http://www.otecnews.org/
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > --
                > Sent from Gmail for mobile | mobile.google.com
                >
                > Raymond Hicks
                > ----------------------
                > Would you do it with me
                > Heal the scars and change the stars
                > Would you do it for me
                > Turn loose the heaven within
                > (\__/)
                > (='.'=)This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
                > (")_(")signature to help him gain world domination.
                >
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