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Re: Pixel Technologies RF PRO-1A Shielded Loop vs Wellbook ALA1530

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  • k7uxo
    I am a recent owner of the Pixel loop too. My impressions are mixed between excited and disappointed. I am excited because the thing actually works, and seems
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 28, 2011
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      I am a recent owner of the Pixel loop too. My impressions are mixed between excited and disappointed.

      I am excited because the thing actually works, and seems to work well. Signal strength is not as good as my 180 foot wire on higher frequencies, but on lower frequencies it does well on siganl strength. The main thing is the noise is gone. All the power line "buzzzzz" is history - which makes for a nice signal to noise and clean readable signals.

      What is disappointing is the build. The loop itself is parts from home depot mostly. That in its self is not a problem, because things can be replaced locally and inexpensively. It is how it is put together that is bothersome.

      The shielded portion of the loop is aluminum tubing. It is attached at the bottom by pop rivets. This is an electrical connection as well as a mechanical one. The wire inside the loop is very small gauge, about 18 or 20 gauge by the look of it... maybe even as small as 22. What is clear about this design, is they did not do much to minimize resistance like you would in a transmitting loop. There is a heavy reliance on the loops ability to reject noise, and the preamplifier to boost the signal. I wonder how well this loop will work when exposed to weather for some time, and these connections become loose and weathered.

      As it is, I feel compelled to rebuild parts of the loop. Increase the wire size to about 6 or 4 gauge, and a more reliable electrical connection at the bottom of the loop.

      David McGinnis.
    • Jerry Flanders
      I saw one of these at the Orlando hamfest a couple of weeks ago, but didn t think to check to see if it could be weatherproofed better. Do you think it be
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 2, 2011
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        I saw one of these at the Orlando hamfest a couple of weeks ago, but
        didn't think to check to see if it could be weatherproofed better. Do
        you think it be possible to weather-seal the bottom joints with some
        large heat-shrinkable tubing?

        Jerry W4UK

        At 09:04 PM 2/28/2011, you wrote:
        >I am a recent owner of the Pixel loop too. My impressions are mixed
        >between excited and disappointed.
        >
        >I am excited because the thing actually works, and seems to work
        >well. Signal strength is not as good as my 180 foot wire on higher
        >frequencies, but on lower frequencies it does well on siganl
        >strength. The main thing is the noise is gone. All the power line
        >"buzzzzz" is history - which makes for a nice signal to noise and
        >clean readable signals.
        >
        >What is disappointing is the build. The loop itself is parts from
        >home depot mostly. That in its self is not a problem, because
        >things can be replaced locally and inexpensively. It is how it is
        >put together that is bothersome.
        >
        >The shielded portion of the loop is aluminum tubing. It is attached
        >at the bottom by pop rivets. This is an electrical connection as
        >well as a mechanical one. The wire inside the loop is very small
        >gauge, about 18 or 20 gauge by the look of it... maybe even as small
        >as 22. What is clear about this design, is they did not do much to
        >minimize resistance like you would in a transmitting loop. There is
        >a heavy reliance on the loops ability to reject noise, and the
        >preamplifier to boost the signal. I wonder how well this loop will
        >work when exposed to weather for some time, and these connections
        >become loose and weathered.
        >
        >As it is, I feel compelled to rebuild parts of the loop. Increase
        >the wire size to about 6 or 4 gauge, and a more reliable electrical
        >connection at the bottom of the loop.
        >
        >David McGinnis.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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