Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

BENDING COPPER TUBING

Expand Messages
  • RICHARD JURKOWSKI
    The tube MAY kink if the bend is too sharp. When I raced model boats we would heat the copper tube with a bernzamatic torch until red hot then drop it into a
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
      The tube MAY kink if the bend is too sharp.
      When I raced model boats we would heat the copper
      tube with a bernzamatic torch until red hot then
      drop it into a bucket of water to cool.The part
      that was heated will be softer and bend easily
      without kinking.If desired it can be heated again
      and immersed into OIL to harden it up.
      Good Luck,
      Rich WB2WGX
    • Brian Gerber
      Use a tubing bender! It s a long spring type tool that goes over the full length of the bend, it keeps the tubing from going out of round! Lowe s, home depot
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
        Use a tubing bender!

        It's a long spring type tool that goes over the full length of the bend, it keeps the tubing from going out of round!
        Lowe's, home depot etc...

        RICHARD JURKOWSKI <WB2WGX@...> wrote: The tube MAY kink if the bend is too sharp.
        When I raced model boats we would heat the copper
        tube with a bernzamatic torch until red hot then
        drop it into a bucket of water to cool.The part
        that was heated will be softer and bend easily
        without kinking.If desired it can be heated again
        and immersed into OIL to harden it up.
        Good Luck,
        Rich WB2WGX






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ww8o@verizon.net
        ... When I work on AC I use a spring for each side of copper use that will bend copper and not kink. look at the hardware and see if they still have thye
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
          >From: RICHARD JURKOWSKI <WB2WGX@...>
          >Date: 2008/03/01 Sat AM 09:01:13 CST
          >To: loopantennas@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [loopantennas] BENDING COPPER TUBING

          When I work on AC I use a spring for each side of copper
          use that will bend copper and not kink. look at the hardware
          and see if they still have thye spring..

          Gary WW8O

          > The tube MAY kink if the bend is too sharp.
          >When I raced model boats we would heat the copper
          >tube with a bernzamatic torch until red hot then
          >drop it into a bucket of water to cool.The part
          >that was heated will be softer and bend easily
          >without kinking.If desired it can be heated again
          >and immersed into OIL to harden it up.
          > Good Luck,
          > Rich WB2WGX
          >
          >
        • Chris Trask
          ... Small Parts sells something like that for small diameter tubing. Chris ,----------------------. High Performance Mixers and / What s all this
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
            >
            > When I work on AC I use a spring for each side of copper
            > use that will bend copper and not kink. look at the hardware
            > and see if they still have thye spring..
            >
            > Gary WW8O
            >

            Small Parts sells something like that for small diameter tubing.

            Chris

            ,----------------------. High Performance Mixers and
            / What's all this \ Amplifiers for RF Communications
            / extinct stuff, anyhow? /
            \ _______,--------------' Chris Trask / N7ZWY
            _ |/ Principal Engineer
            oo\ Sonoran Radio Research
            (__)\ _ P.O. Box 25240
            \ \ .' `. Tempe, Arizona 85285-5240
            \ \ / \
            \ '" \ IEEE Senior Member #40274515
            . ( ) \
            '-| )__| :. \ Email: christrask@...
            | | | | \ '. http://www.home.earthlink.net/~christrask
            c__; c__; '-..'>.__

            Graphics by Loek Frederiks
          • C. Beijersbergen
            An alternative method for bending tubes is as follows ( I have never done it, but I remember from the text books): Close one end of the tube by soldering an
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
              An alternative method for bending tubes is as follows ( I have never done it, but I remember from the text books):

              Close one end of the tube by soldering an end piece to it.
              Fill the tube completely with fine, dry sand.
              Compact the sand as much as possible, make sure the tube remains completely filled.
              Close the remaining end of the tube in the same manner.
              Now the tube can be bent, it will not kink in sharp bends.

              I remember to have seen a movie when I was a small boy about the fabrication of trombones, instead of sand oil was used. The closure of the ends of the tube was not done by soldering I suspect, but I can't recall those details.

              Cor Beijersbergen


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • gplynas
              Hi Cris and Cor, Packing sand into the tubing and then bending around a mandrel or form works very well. Our company manufactures transmitters and antenna
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
                Hi Cris and Cor, Packing sand into the tubing and then bending around
                a mandrel or form works very well. Our company manufactures
                transmitters and antenna products which involves bending tubing from
                3/8 inch to as much as 3 inches or more. We flatten one end of the
                tubing as a seal, and pour sand into the tubing, while tamping down
                the tube. (For a tube that is 20 feet long, that means someone up on
                the roof pouring in the sand.) We have a device which bumps up the
                tube to ensure that the sand is packed tight. Once the tube is
                filled, the other end is flattened, and the tube is then rolled around
                the mandrel, flattened, or formed to create the coil. The hard part
                can sometimes be removing the sand.
                Best regards,
                Paul
                WA5LFY

                --- In loopantennas@yahoogroups.com, "C. Beijersbergen"
                <c.beijersbergen@...> wrote:
                >
                > An alternative method for bending tubes is as follows ( I have never
                done it, but I remember from the text books):
                >
                > Close one end of the tube by soldering an end piece to it.
                > Fill the tube completely with fine, dry sand.
                > Compact the sand as much as possible, make sure the tube remains
                completely filled.
                > Close the remaining end of the tube in the same manner.
                > Now the tube can be bent, it will not kink in sharp bends.
                >
                > I remember to have seen a movie when I was a small boy about the
                fabrication of trombones, instead of sand oil was used. The closure of
                the ends of the tube was not done by soldering I suspect, but I can't
                recall those details.
                >
                > Cor Beijersbergen
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Chris Trask
                I seem to recall that the method of filling the tubing with sand was seen in the movie Flight of the Phoenix (the original, not the remake) where the model
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 2, 2008
                  I seem to recall that the method of filling the tubing with sand was seen in the movie "Flight of the Phoenix" (the original, not the remake) where the model airplane designer was distilling water from barrels of antifreeze, or something like that.



                  -----Original Message-----
                  >From: gplynas <gplynas@...>
                  >Sent: Mar 1, 2008 5:41 PM
                  >To: loopantennas@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: [loopantennas] Re: BENDING COPPER TUBING
                  >
                  >Hi Cris and Cor, Packing sand into the tubing and then bending around
                  >a mandrel or form works very well. Our company manufactures
                  >transmitters and antenna products which involves bending tubing from
                  >3/8 inch to as much as 3 inches or more. We flatten one end of the
                  >tubing as a seal, and pour sand into the tubing, while tamping down
                  >the tube. (For a tube that is 20 feet long, that means someone up on
                  >the roof pouring in the sand.) We have a device which bumps up the
                  >tube to ensure that the sand is packed tight. Once the tube is
                  >filled, the other end is flattened, and the tube is then rolled around
                  >the mandrel, flattened, or formed to create the coil. The hard part
                  >can sometimes be removing the sand.
                  >Best regards,
                  >Paul
                  >WA5LFY
                  >
                  >--- In loopantennas@yahoogroups.com, "C. Beijersbergen"
                  ><c.beijersbergen@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> An alternative method for bending tubes is as follows ( I have never
                  >done it, but I remember from the text books):
                  >>
                  >> Close one end of the tube by soldering an end piece to it.
                  >> Fill the tube completely with fine, dry sand.
                  >> Compact the sand as much as possible, make sure the tube remains
                  >completely filled.
                  >> Close the remaining end of the tube in the same manner.
                  >> Now the tube can be bent, it will not kink in sharp bends.
                  >>
                  >> I remember to have seen a movie when I was a small boy about the
                  >fabrication of trombones, instead of sand oil was used. The closure of
                  >the ends of the tube was not done by soldering I suspect, but I can't
                  >recall those details.
                  >>
                  >> Cor Beijersbergen
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>
                  >
                  >


                  Chris

                  ,----------------------. High Performance Mixers and
                  / What's all this \ Amplifiers for RF Communications
                  / extinct stuff, anyhow? /
                  \ _______,--------------' Chris Trask / N7ZWY
                  _ |/ Principal Engineer
                  oo\ Sonoran Radio Research
                  (__)\ _ P.O. Box 25240
                  \ \ .' `. Tempe, Arizona 85285-5240
                  \ \ / \
                  \ '" \ IEEE Senior Member #40274515
                  . ( ) \
                  '-| )__| :. \ Email: christrask@...
                  | | | | \ '. http://www.home.earthlink.net/~christrask
                  c__; c__; '-..'>.__

                  Graphics by Loek Frederiks
                • jr_dakota
                  ... completely filled. ... fabrication of trombones, instead of sand oil was used. The closure of the ends of the tube was not done by soldering I suspect, but
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 2, 2008
                    --- In loopantennas@yahoogroups.com, "C. Beijersbergen"
                    <c.beijersbergen@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > An alternative method for bending tubes is as follows ( I have never
                    done it, but I remember from the text books):
                    >
                    > Close one end of the tube by soldering an end piece to it.
                    > Fill the tube completely with fine, dry sand.
                    > Compact the sand as much as possible, make sure the tube remains
                    completely filled.
                    > Close the remaining end of the tube in the same manner.
                    > Now the tube can be bent, it will not kink in sharp bends.
                    >
                    > I remember to have seen a movie when I was a small boy about the
                    fabrication of trombones, instead of sand oil was used. The closure of
                    the ends of the tube was not done by soldering I suspect, but I can't
                    recall those details.
                    >
                    > Cor Beijersbergen
                    >
                    >

                    I used to use a similar technique for bending 2" PVC conduit ... I had
                    a heater I called the Easy Bake Oven (I used to cook sandwiches in it
                    for lunch) and a set of plugs for 1" - 2" PVC and you put the plugs
                    in, place the section you want to bend in the oven until it is soft
                    and then bend a 90 or whatever angle(s) you need and the plugs hold
                    the air in and that keeps the PVC from collapsing when you bend it
                    .... That saved having to buy a 90 and 2 couplings as well as made for
                    a smoother pull as you don't have the joints to hang up on when you
                    pull your wire which is critical when you are pulling 3 wires large
                    enought to carry 100-100 amps of current ....

                    JR
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • sonicxcove@aol.com
                    There are some low melting bismuth alloys that can be used to fill tubing to keep it from kinking or flattening. One such alloy melts at 117º F, but is
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 2, 2008
                      There are some low melting bismuth alloys that can be used
                      to fill tubing to keep it from kinking or flattening. One such
                      alloy melts at 117º F, but is rather expensive. Another alloy
                      melts at 160º F and is much cheaper. Since both melt below
                      the boiling point of water the tubing would never be heated
                      anywhere near the point of annealing it when filling or removing
                      the alloy from the tubing.

                      Trumpet and trombone makers use a soap solution for
                      making the bends needed in brass tubing. The tubing is
                      filled then frozen with this solution inside the tubing. I do
                      not know what solution they are using, but it would be worth
                      looking into.

                      Filling the tube with about any liquid and tightly sealing the
                      ends ought to work as long as you work the tubing at room
                      temperature. The hydraulic pressure inside the tube would
                      prevent it from collapsing.

                      Trying to tightly pack sand in a long tube would seem to be
                      rather difficult if not impossible.

                      Sources for low melting alloys:
                      _http://www.smallparts.com/products/descriptions/lma.cfm_
                      (http://www.smallparts.com/products/descriptions/lma.cfm)
                      _http://www.micromark.com_ (http://www.micromark.com)

                      Eric


                      In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:41:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                      gplynas@... writes:

                      Hi Cris and Cor, Packing sand into the tubing and then bending around
                      a mandrel or form works very well. Our company manufactures
                      transmitters and antenna products which involves bending tubing from
                      3/8 inch to as much as 3 inches or more. We flatten one end of the
                      tubing as a seal, and pour sand into the tubing, while tamping down
                      the tube.






                      **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
                      (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
                      2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.