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Re: [loopantennas] Re: My loop projects

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  • David Thompson
    To feed 10 turns of wire through the pipe, couldn t you pass a first wire through the loop, and then tie it into a circle with a knot. Then tie the end of the
    Message 1 of 11 , May 17 6:42 PM
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      To feed 10 turns of wire through the pipe, couldn't you pass a first wire through the loop, and then tie it into a circle with a knot. Then tie the end of the loop antenna to the knot of the first wire, and spin the first wire circle around 360. Now the "front" of the antenna wire is wrapped in the pipe. Then pull the slack from the antenna wire, so that the back of the antenna wire is in the pipe. Now spin the circle 360 again, and pull the slack. Etc. Then, undo the knot, and remove the circle of wire. Now, 10 turns of wire are in the pipe.

      "c.e.boyd" <theboyd@...> wrote:
      Hi all: If you're talking about one or two passes around the loop, not a
      problem. On the other hand, if there are many turns to be forced through the
      loop, that becomes a bit more difficult. But, by slitting the sprinkler
      system feed line with a utility knife, you can insert the needed number of
      loops, and once in place, 33 it back together every few inches. Oh, "33" is
      sparkie tape. Good listening: theboyd
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "elmo_0406" <christine@...>
      To: <loopantennas@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, 17 May, 2006 10:59
      Subject: [loopantennas] Re: My loop projects


      >
      > You could use an outlet hose for a washing machine or dishwasher
      > with a junction box both found at B&Q.
      > :)
      > Only problem is how to feed through many loops into the felxible
      > hose.



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    • gandalfg8@aol.com
      In a message dated 18/05/2006 02:42:45 GMT Daylight Time, movindave@yahoo.com writes: To feed 10 turns of wire through the pipe, couldn t you pass a first
      Message 2 of 11 , May 18 1:00 AM
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        In a message dated 18/05/2006 02:42:45 GMT Daylight Time,
        movindave@... writes:

        To feed 10 turns of wire through the pipe, couldn't you pass a first wire
        through the loop, and then tie it into a circle with a knot. Then tie the end
        of the loop antenna to the knot of the first wire, and spin the first wire
        circle around 360. Now the "front" of the antenna wire is wrapped in the
        pipe. Then pull the slack from the antenna wire, so that the back of the antenna
        wire is in the pipe. Now spin the circle 360 again, and pull the slack.
        Etc. Then, undo the knot, and remove the circle of wire. Now, 10 turns of wire
        are in the pipe.



        I don't see why this shouldn't work but I would suggest a variation on this
        that allows for a stiffer "first wire" so probably deals better with the
        tendency of the loop to tighten as more turns are pushed round.

        There is, or was, a wiring gadget that used to be called a mouse, long
        before that term was immortalised as a lump of plastic on a desk.
        The wiring gadget got it's name from it's ability to get into tight spaces
        so it's long and thin, no large lumps here.
        It's flexible whilst being stiff enough to be pushed through conduit etc,
        with a rounded end that will work it's way through small gaps around existing
        cables.
        I first saw something similar many years ago, being used where modifications
        were being carried out on mobile military radar installations that
        necessitated running extra wires into some very large cable looms.


        The "relatively modern" version I've got came from RS Components in the UK,
        I don't know if they still sell them, and is basically just a length of
        stranded steel wire, with a plastic sleeve, terminating in a small brass slug that
        is rounded on the end. Overall diameter is approx 1/8 inch.

        This could be pushed through an open circle of PVC pipe, taking the wire
        with it, and pulled back after being released following every complete turn
        before being reattached and pushed round again.
        There would still be a tendency for the wires to tighten up in the loop as
        it's pushed but that shouldn't be too difficult to deal with.
        My gadget is only about 3 metres long, so only good for 1 metre loops, but
        I'm sure there must be suitable flexible cable around that's available in
        longer lengths.

        All that's required is something flexible enough to go round the bends but
        stiff enough to resist piling up inside the loop.
        I suspect the flexible wire drain cleaners I've seen advertised will be
        something similar so that might be one possible option.

        regards

        Nigel
        G8PZR



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