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Re: [locost] aluminum info

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  • John Gould
    Hi Keith, I m new to the group and while I didn t see the original emails. My thoughts are to use either 2024-O or 6061-O both of which are soft, then after
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 23, 2006
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      Hi Keith,

      I'm new to the group and while I didn't see the original emails. My thoughts are to use either 2024-O or 6061-O both of which are soft, then after forming send it to a metal shop to have it heat treated to bring them up to strength (T3 in the case of 2024 or T6 for 6061) The nice thing with 6061 is that it's also weldable. I was an aircraft mechanic for almost 17 years, most of those working with sheetmetal.

      Don't know if I'm on base, but hth's

      John

      Keith Williams <kwilliams1936@...> wrote:
      I just filtered thru about the oldest 800 letters and couldn't find the one describing the proper alloy to use and the technique to anneal it and work it around the rear of the car rolling it over the corner curves without wrinkling. Had something to do with using a bar of soap smeared on the hot metal to indicate when the temp was right by discoloration, etc. Ring any bells? I should have moved it for future reference at the time. Thanx KEITH WILLIAMS

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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    • Spock
      I?m new with the Locost project and I didn?t arrive to the aluminium task, but I?m wondering why you need to anneal the aluminium ? Thanks ... You ... melting
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 30, 2006
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        I?m new with the Locost project and I didn?t arrive to the aluminium
        task, but I?m wondering why you need to anneal the aluminium ?

        Thanks


        >----Mensaje original----
        >De: d_w_jenkins@...
        >Fecha: 23/03/2006 05:44
        >Para: <locost@yahoogroups.com>
        >Asunto: [locost] Re: aluminum info
        >
        >The correct grade of ali for most people is "whatever they've got in
        >the supplier's rack" - in other words, general-purpose ali sheet.
        You
        >will see terms such as 'half-hard' (which sounds like an affliction)
        >or some grade codes/numbers, but most suppliers I've talked to just
        >get confused by them (unless you talk to the real specialists). The
        >ordinary grade is fine.
        >
        >As for annealing, you are correct - rub a bar of ordinary soap over
        >the metal (or smear some fairy liquid over it) and heat it until the
        >soap turns dark brown to black. Let it cool down (you can help it
        >with a wet rag) and it will be soft enough to work. Practice on a
        >piece of scrap first, as if you overheat the ali will vanish before
        >your eyes! :) The 'black soap' stage is quite a way before the
        melting
        >point, so it is a safe indicator. Expect to anneal many times in a
        >job, as the metal will work-harden rapidly as you hammer it.
        >
        >BTW - you will only need to anneal where you are doing difficult
        >curves. The bigger curves such as the side panels next to the engine
        >compartment, and the near-vertical bends on the back panel, can be
        >done by hand. It's places like the top of the back panel where it
        >goes over the frame that will need it.
        >
        >Have fun!
        >
        >David
        >
        >--- In locost@yahoogroups.com, Keith Williams <kwilliams1936@...>
        wrote:
        >>
        >> I just filtered thru about the oldest 800 letters and couldn't find
        >the one describing the proper alloy to use and the technique to
        anneal
        >it and work it around the rear of the car rolling it over the corner
        >curves without wrinkling. Had something to do with using a bar of
        >soap smeared on the hot metal to indicate when the temp was right by
        >discoloration, etc. Ring any bells? I should have moved it for
        >future reference at the time. Thanx KEITH WILLIAMS
        >>
        >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
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      • Dave Grandeffo
        ... No Wayne, Any aluminum alloy will be annealed by this process. I wouldn t trust any other method that doesn t indicate the ENTIRE area you re trying to
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 1 6:08 AM
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          Wayne Meckling asked:
          >
          > Is there any special alloy that is needed to be able to make it
          > workable with the process described above?
          >

          No Wayne,
          Any aluminum alloy will be annealed by this process. I wouldn't trust
          any other method that doesn't indicate the ENTIRE area you're trying to
          anneal. You might not heat the piece consistently otherwise.

          --
          Dave Grandeffo
          www.kettlemorainemotorsports.com
          Southern Wisconsin
          USA
        • Keith Williams
          Spock---There is a problem in rolling the ally around the rounded corner of the top rear corner tubes. If the metal doesn t compress there is too much metal
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 3 5:53 AM
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            Spock---There is a problem in rolling the ally around the rounded corner of the top rear corner tubes. If the metal doesn't compress there is too much metal and it will wrinkle as it goes to a smaller radius.

            Spock <spock@...> wrote: I?m new with the Locost project and I didn?t arrive to the aluminium
            task, but I?m wondering why you need to anneal the aluminium ?

            Thanks


            >----Mensaje original----
            >De: d_w_jenkins@...
            >Fecha: 23/03/2006 05:44
            >Para:
            >Asunto: [locost] Re: aluminum info
            >
            >The correct grade of ali for most people is "whatever they've got in
            >the supplier's rack" - in other words, general-purpose ali sheet.
            You
            >will see terms such as 'half-hard' (which sounds like an affliction)
            >or some grade codes/numbers, but most suppliers I've talked to just
            >get confused by them (unless you talk to the real specialists). The
            >ordinary grade is fine.
            >
            >As for annealing, you are correct - rub a bar of ordinary soap over
            >the metal (or smear some fairy liquid over it) and heat it until the
            >soap turns dark brown to black. Let it cool down (you can help it
            >with a wet rag) and it will be soft enough to work. Practice on a
            >piece of scrap first, as if you overheat the ali will vanish before
            >your eyes! :) The 'black soap' stage is quite a way before the
            melting
            >point, so it is a safe indicator. Expect to anneal many times in a
            >job, as the metal will work-harden rapidly as you hammer it.
            >
            >BTW - you will only need to anneal where you are doing difficult
            >curves. The bigger curves such as the side panels next to the engine
            >compartment, and the near-vertical bends on the back panel, can be
            >done by hand. It's places like the top of the back panel where it
            >goes over the frame that will need it.
            >
            >Have fun!
            >
            >David
            >
            >--- In locost@yahoogroups.com, Keith Williams
            wrote:
            >>
            >> I just filtered thru about the oldest 800 letters and couldn't find
            >the one describing the proper alloy to use and the technique to
            anneal
            >it and work it around the rear of the car rolling it over the corner
            >curves without wrinkling. Had something to do with using a bar of
            >soap smeared on the hot metal to indicate when the temp was right by
            >discoloration, etc. Ring any bells? I should have moved it for
            >future reference at the time. Thanx KEITH WILLIAMS
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >
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            >
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            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
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            Yahoo! Groups Links









            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Wayne Meckling
            I have used a slightly different method to anneal the aluminium. With the oxy/acyl tourch burning very sooty put a layer of soot on the alum where you want to
            Message 5 of 13 , Apr 26 4:55 PM
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              I have used a slightly different method to anneal the aluminium. With
              the oxy/acyl tourch burning very sooty put a layer of soot on the
              alum where you want to work it. Re-adjust the torch to burn properly
              and heat the alum in the same areas until the soot is burned off.
              This will make the alum easier to cut and form.

              Wayne



              --- In locost@yahoogroups.com, Keith Williams <kwilliams1936@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Spock---There is a problem in rolling the ally around the rounded
              corner of the top rear corner tubes. If the metal doesn't compress
              there is too much metal and it will wrinkle as it goes to a smaller
              radius.
              >
              > Spock <spock@...> wrote: I?m new with the Locost project and I
              didn?t arrive to the aluminium
              > task, but I?m wondering why you need to anneal the aluminium ?
              >
              > Thanks
              >
              >
              > >----Mensaje original----
              > >De: d_w_jenkins@...
              > >Fecha: 23/03/2006 05:44
              > >Para:
              > >Asunto: [locost] Re: aluminum info
              > >
              > >The correct grade of ali for most people is "whatever they've got
              in
              > >the supplier's rack" - in other words, general-purpose ali sheet.
              > You
              > >will see terms such as 'half-hard' (which sounds like an
              affliction)
              > >or some grade codes/numbers, but most suppliers I've talked to just
              > >get confused by them (unless you talk to the real specialists). The
              > >ordinary grade is fine.
              > >
              > >As for annealing, you are correct - rub a bar of ordinary soap over
              > >the metal (or smear some fairy liquid over it) and heat it until
              the
              > >soap turns dark brown to black. Let it cool down (you can help it
              > >with a wet rag) and it will be soft enough to work. Practice on a
              > >piece of scrap first, as if you overheat the ali will vanish before
              > >your eyes! :) The 'black soap' stage is quite a way before the
              > melting
              > >point, so it is a safe indicator. Expect to anneal many times in a
              > >job, as the metal will work-harden rapidly as you hammer it.
              > >
              > >BTW - you will only need to anneal where you are doing difficult
              > >curves. The bigger curves such as the side panels next to the
              engine
              > >compartment, and the near-vertical bends on the back panel, can be
              > >done by hand. It's places like the top of the back panel where it
              > >goes over the frame that will need it.
              > >
              > >Have fun!
              > >
              > >David
              > >
              > >--- In locost@yahoogroups.com, Keith Williams
              > wrote:
              > >>
              > >> I just filtered thru about the oldest 800 letters and couldn't
              find
              > >the one describing the proper alloy to use and the technique to
              > anneal
              > >it and work it around the rear of the car rolling it over the
              corner
              > >curves without wrinkling. Had something to do with using a bar of
              > >soap smeared on the hot metal to indicate when the temp was right
              by
              > >discoloration, etc. Ring any bells? I should have moved it for
              > >future reference at the time. Thanx KEITH WILLIAMS
              > >>
              > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
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