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Re: [liturgy-l] Liturgy-related reading?

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  • Dana Netherton
    ... And as for something completely different ... :-) Since I am struggling to learn Byzantine chant, I m reviewing some of my books on the subject:
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 10, 2002
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      On 11 Jul 2002 at 3:04, zz4j9m wrote:

      > I notice that our posting on this list has been greatly under average
      > during June and July. Perhaps we need some additional threads. I'll
      > start one. What have you read recently that's related to liturgy?
      >
      > My answer: I'm reading (though daunted by) Dom Gregory Dix's THE SHAPE
      > OF THE LITURGY. I'm also studying my new copy of the two- volume
      > Monastic Antiphonal published and used by the monks of the Abbey of
      > Santo Domingo de Silos. <snip to end>

      And as for something completely different ... :-)

      Since I am struggling to learn Byzantine chant, I'm reviewing some of
      my books on the subject: currently Johann von Gardner's "Russian
      Church Singing, Vol 1: Orthodox Worship and Hymnography". Though
      much of his discussion is aimed at Russian music, I am seeing a lot
      of shared material with Greek ("Byzantine") music, so I am picking up
      categories and explanations of troparia, kontakia, and so forth.

      I find that it helps me to compare his explanations with textual
      examples, such as the bilingual Sunday Greek Matins services
      published by Narthex Press in California (each year in two phone-book-
      sized volumes, since Matins has more "propers" than "ordinary" and
      thus is often hugely different from one Sunday to the next), and the
      Byzantine chant music for Vespers and Sunday Matins published by Fr
      Seraphim Dedes of St Gregory of Palamas monastery in Perrysville,
      Ohio.

      On a recommendation, I've recently picked up Oliver Strunk's "Source
      Readings in Music History: Ancient and Medieval", but I admit I
      didn't find much that truly engaged my enthusiasm there.

      I recently read Robert Taft's "The Byzantine Rite: A Short History".
      It was an interesting overview -- apparently intended as an Eastern
      counterpoint to Theodor Klauser's well-known "A Short History of the
      Western Liturgy", but being only a fraction of the length (and not
      being part of the foundation of changes (some would say
      "revolutionary changes") in its subject), it serves simply as a
      survey-introduction to a topic that clearly has a great deal more
      detail behind it, detail that appears still to lie chiefly in the
      journals. :-)

      So I continue to learn Byzantine chant notation by reviewing the
      written music, and listening to Fr Seraphim's recordings of the
      music, during my morning exercise routine. :-)

      -- (Mr) Dana Netherton, dana@...
      Ph.D., London (Eccles. Hist.)
      LCDR, USNR (ret.)
      President, Athos Corporation
    • Christian McConnell
      ... Not entirely ... if one wants more detail than the Short History , one need only turn to Taft s several monographs! Chris
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 11, 2002
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        --- Dana Netherton <dana@...> wrote:

        > I recently read Robert Taft's "The Byzantine Rite: A
        > Short History".
        > It was an interesting overview -- apparently
        > intended as an Eastern
        > counterpoint to Theodor Klauser's well-known "A
        > Short History of the
        > Western Liturgy", but being only a fraction of the
        > length (and not
        > being part of the foundation of changes (some would
        > say
        > "revolutionary changes") in its subject), it serves
        > simply as a
        > survey-introduction to a topic that clearly has a
        > great deal more
        > detail behind it, detail that appears still to lie
        > chiefly in the
        > journals. :-)

        Not entirely ... if one wants more detail than the
        "Short History", one need only turn to Taft's several
        monographs!

        Chris


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      • rebcamuse
        Thank you for starting this thread! I have the Dix checked out from the library right now...I have quite a bit of reading re: the Catholic liturgy to do for my
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 12, 2002
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          Thank you for starting this thread! I have the Dix checked out from
          the library right now...I have quite a bit of reading re: the
          Catholic liturgy to do for my dissertation. Please let me know of
          anything you would recommend...particularly in regards to the Mass
          and music.

          Best,
          Rebecca


          --- In liturgy-l@y..., "zz4j9m" <zz4j9m@y...> wrote:
          > I notice that our posting on this list has been greatly under
          average
          > during June and July. Perhaps we need some additional threads.
          I'll
          > start one. What have you read recently that's related to liturgy?
          >
          > My answer: I'm reading (though daunted by) Dom Gregory Dix's THE
          > SHAPE OF THE LITURGY. I'm also studying my new copy of the two-
          > volume Monastic Antiphonal published and used by the monks of the
          > Abbey of Santo Domingo de Silos. This is a beautifully done office
          > according to the 1977 Benedictine guidelines (THESAURUS LITURGIAE
          > HORARUM MONASTICAE) and is in Latin and Spanish, with Gregorian
          chant
          > hymns, responsories, and antiphons from the PSALTERIUM MONASTICUM
          and
          > LIBER HYMNARIUS of St. Peter's Abbey, Solesmes. The Silos office
          > consists of a Vigils volume and a Day Hours volume. They sell them
          > via their Web site, but I got mine through eBay (I must say I think
          I
          > ended up overpaying with eBay, but whatever).
          >
          > It always gives me much pleasure to study how a particular
          > Benedictine community has worked out its own Office. I think it
          > would be a fascinating project to make a Latin/English edition of
          > these books, using the BCP 1979 psalter (as it's not under
          copyright)
          > for the vernacular version of the psalms. It looks as though the
          > Silos books assume any chanted things will be in Latin, even if the
          > psalm texts are in Spanish (for which there are simple modal psalm
          > tones provided in addition to the traditional ones for the Latin).
          >
          > I'm also reading the new Atkins Diet book, but I haven't found any
          > liturgy in there, other than perhaps a litany of the evils of
          > carbohydrates...a commination, perhaps.
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