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Re: [liturgy-l] Vestments & Colours

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  • Paul Weary
    M. Thannisch wrote: I am told that in Africa, white is a sign of morning, and that in Ethiopia, red is a sign of resurrection. Recently I prepared some
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2002
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      M. Thannisch wrote:

      "I am told that in Africa, white is a sign of morning, and that in Ethiopia, red is a sign of resurrection."

      Recently I prepared some prayers of thanksgiving for a member of my church who is an Ashanti from Ghana, in memory of her mother who died earlier this year. She showed me a video of the funeral in Ghana - a most impressive occasion. I was curious to observe that the family mourners wore black and red robes, the presiding ministers red stoles and many of the congregation had a red ribbon pinned to their clothes.

      Apparently, for the Ashanti, red is the colour of deep mourning, explained to me as symbolising that 'our eyes are red with sorrow'. the red ribbon is equivalent to the black armband worn in western countries.

      However, when we included the prayers of thanksgiving in worship several weeks later, all the family members who came were dressed in black and white. I'll have to check what the particular symbolism behind this is...

      Shalom,

      --
      Paul Weary
      Croydon, UK



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • M. Thannisch
      Having just recently trying to impress upon my students the wide cultural diversity of Africa and the reasons for it, I am not at all surprised. I hope all of
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1, 2002
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        Having just recently trying to impress upon my students the wide cultural
        diversity of Africa and the reasons for it, I am not at all surprised. I
        hope all of our churches there are sensitive to this. This is something I
        wish I had thought of when working with the Miskito Indians of Honduras. I
        only began to be sensitive in it when I realised that either (most) Miskitos
        are colour blind or for some reason do not distinguish between blue and
        green.

        Shalom in Yeshua ha Moshiach

        Michael Joe Thannisch
        mjthan@...


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Paul Weary" <paulweary@...>
        To: <liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, June 01, 2002 3:49 AM
        Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Vestments & Colours


        > M. Thannisch wrote:
        >
        > "I am told that in Africa, white is a sign of morning, and that in
        Ethiopia, red is a sign of resurrection."
        >
        > Recently I prepared some prayers of thanksgiving for a member of my church
        who is an Ashanti from Ghana, in memory of her mother who died earlier this
        year. She showed me a video of the funeral in Ghana - a most impressive
        occasion. I was curious to observe that the family mourners wore black and
        red robes, the presiding ministers red stoles and many of the congregation
        had a red ribbon pinned to their clothes.
        >
        > Apparently, for the Ashanti, red is the colour of deep mourning, explained
        to me as symbolising that 'our eyes are red with sorrow'. the red ribbon is
        equivalent to the black armband worn in western countries.
        >
        > However, when we included the prayers of thanksgiving in worship several
        weeks later, all the family members who came were dressed in black and
        white. I'll have to check what the particular symbolism behind this is...
        >
        > Shalom,
        >
        > --
        > Paul Weary
        > Croydon, UK
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
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      • alexdb20008
        To follow up last week s conversations about vesting in ecumenical settings, this weekend at the Washington National Cathedral, the Rt. Rev. John Bryson Chane
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 3, 2002
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          To follow up last week's conversations about vesting in ecumenical
          settings, this weekend at the Washington National Cathedral, the Rt.
          Rev. John Bryson Chane was consecrated and enthroned as the Eighth
          Episcopal Bishop of Washington. The spectacular consecration
          Eucharist provided an opportunity to see the diversity of ecumenical
          vesture on full display.

          The color of the day was red. Episcopal clergy wore alb and stole or
          surplice and stole. Episcopal bishops wore rochet and chimere.
          Priests and Deacons with a role in the service wore chasuble or
          dalmatic, as appropriate. Bishops with a liturgical role as co-
          consecrators or concelebrants wore cope and miter or chasuble and
          miter, as appropriate. The Presiding Bishop wore chasuble and miter.

          As for visiting clergy, the Lutherans wore alb and stole or surplice
          and stole. Methodists and Reformed ministers wore black gown and
          stole or simply black gown. The august Presbyterian minister
          William Sloane Coffin preached the sermon. He was vested in his
          usual red academic robe with black velvet "facings" on it.

          Visiting bishops: the Greek Orthodox bishop wore cassock and
          stovepipe hat (I forget its proper name). The RC bishop wore
          cassock, surplice and biretta. Our Lutheran Bishop -- who served as
          a co-consecrator -- wore cope and miter.

          Quite the variety on display.
          Alex
        • dollpka
          ... I visited the site: http://www.edow.org/news/photos/consecration.html and looked at the pictures. The only bishop is a cassock that I saw looked like he
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 4, 2002
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            --- In liturgy-l@y..., "alexdb20008" <alexdb20008@y...> wrote:
            > To follow up last week's conversations about vesting in ecumenical
            > settings, this weekend at the Washington National Cathedral, the Rt.
            > Rev. John Bryson Chane was consecrated and enthroned as the Eighth
            > Episcopal Bishop of Washington. The spectacular consecration
            > Eucharist provided an opportunity to see the diversity of ecumenical
            > vesture on full display.
            >
            > Visiting bishops: the Greek Orthodox bishop wore cassock and
            > stovepipe hat (I forget its proper name).
            >
            > Quite the variety on display.
            > Alex

            I visited the site:
            http://www.edow.org/news/photos/consecration.html
            and looked at the pictures. The only bishop is a cassock that I
            saw looked like he had an Armenian "hat" rather than a Greek "hat".
            Are you sure that this was a Greek bishop? Do you know the name?
            Armenians have pointy hats while Greeks/Orthodox have flat ones.

            Kenneth Doll
          • dollpka
            ... I visited the site: http://www.edow.org/news/photos/consecration.html and looked at the pictures. The only bishop in a cassock that I saw looked like he
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 4, 2002
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              > --- In liturgy-l@y..., "alexdb20008" <alexdb20008@y...> wrote:
              > To follow up last week's conversations about vesting in ecumenical
              > settings, this weekend at the Washington National Cathedral, the Rt.
              > Rev. John Bryson Chane was consecrated and enthroned as the Eighth
              > Episcopal Bishop of Washington. The spectacular consecration
              > Eucharist provided an opportunity to see the diversity of ecumenical
              > vesture on full display.
              >
              > Visiting bishops: the Greek Orthodox bishop wore cassock and
              > stovepipe hat (I forget its proper name).
              >
              > Quite the variety on display.
              > Alex

              I visited the site:
              http://www.edow.org/news/photos/consecration.html
              and looked at the pictures. The only bishop in a cassock that I
              saw looked like he had an Armenian "hat" rather than a Greek "hat".
              Are you sure that this was a Greek bishop? Do you know the name?
              Armenians have pointy hats while Greeks/Orthodox have flat ones.

              Kenneth Doll

              That would be: "The only bishop _in_ a cassock..."
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