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Early 20th C. Good Friday

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  • Lewis Whitaker
    Liturgistas: I ve run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to your better wisdom to interpret it: It is a great dramatic moment Ricketts
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
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      Liturgistas:

      I've run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to your better wisdom to interpret it:

      "It is a great dramatic moment Ricketts could never equal nor any dramaturge of the world, when the priests lie flat before the stripped altar; & only the white altar-cloth, before it is used for the service, is laid over them as a shroud."

      I've never heard of the altar cloth -- I'm assuming she means the fair linen -- laid over the priest before the (Roman Catholic) Good Friday Liturgy.

      Anyone?

      Lew

    • Janet Roth
      Don t the Orthodox have a white altar cloth under the colored one? I m not sure it is removable, however. (I helped my mother in law make the one for the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
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        Don't the Orthodox have a white altar cloth under the colored one?  I'm not sure it is removable, however.   (I helped my mother in law make the one  for the Orthodox church in Post Falls, Idaho.  (but, of course, being a woman I didn't get to see it on the altar….)

               janet
        On Jun 26, 2013, at 12:53 PM, Lewis Whitaker <lhwhitaker@...> wrote:

         

        Liturgistas:

        I've run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to your better wisdom to interpret it:

        "It is a great dramatic moment Ricketts could never equal nor any dramaturge of the world, when the priests lie flat before the stripped altar; & only the white altar-cloth, before it is used for the service, is laid over them as a shroud."

        I've never heard of the altar cloth -- I'm assuming she means the fair linen -- laid over the priest before the (Roman Catholic) Good Friday Liturgy.

        Anyone?

        Lew



      • Douglas Cowling
        From: Lewis Whitaker Subject: [liturgy-l] Early 20th C. Good Friday I ve run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
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          From: Lewis Whitaker <lhwhitaker@...>
          Subject: [liturgy-l] Early 20th C. Good Friday

          I've run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to your better wisdom to interpret it:

          "It is a great dramatic moment Ricketts could never equal nor any dramaturge of the world, when the priests lie flat before the stripped altar; & only the white altar-cloth, before it is used for the service, is laid over them as a shroud." 


          Sounds like a monastic admission rite. 

          Doug Cowling
          Director of Music
          St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
          Toronto


        • Lewis Whitaker
          That would have been the funeral pall, though. This is definitely in the context of a Good Friday service in a Roman Catholic Church. On Wed, Jun 26, 2013 at
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
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            That would have been the funeral pall, though.

            This is definitely in the context of a Good Friday service in a Roman Catholic Church.



            On Wed, Jun 26, 2013 at 4:07 PM, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:


            From: Lewis Whitaker <lhwhitaker@...>
            Subject: [liturgy-l] Early 20th C. Good Friday

            I've run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to your better wisdom to interpret it:

            "It is a great dramatic moment Ricketts could never equal nor any dramaturge of the world, when the priests lie flat before the stripped altar; & only the white altar-cloth, before it is used for the service, is laid over them as a shroud." 


            Sounds like a monastic admission rite. 

            Doug Cowling
            Director of Music
            St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
            Toronto





          • James
            The outer cloth changes with the seasons, the inner cloth which is white stays on until it falls apart. Rdr. James Morgan PS It would take a liturgical
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
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              The outer cloth changes with the seasons, the inner cloth which is white stays on until it falls apart.

              Rdr. James Morgan

              PS It would take a liturgical archeologist to determine why an altar cloth (fair linen) was used as a 'shroud' for the sacred ministers of the Good Friday Liturgy!
              but thanks, Lew for asking....

              --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Janet Roth <jproth@...> wrote:
              >
              > Don't the Orthodox have a white altar cloth under the colored one? I'm not sure it is removable, however. (I helped my mother in law make the one for the Orthodox church in Post Falls, Idaho. (but, of course, being a woman I didn't get to see it on the altar….)
              >
              > janet
              > On Jun 26, 2013, at 12:53 PM, Lewis Whitaker <lhwhitaker@...> wrote:
              >
              > >
              > > Liturgistas:
              > >
              > > I've run across this reference in a diary, and wanted to defer to your better wisdom to interpret it:
              > >
              > > "It is a great dramatic moment Ricketts could never equal nor any dramaturge of the world, when the priests lie flat before the stripped altar; & only the white altar-cloth, before it is used for the service, is laid over them as a shroud."
              > >
              > > I've never heard of the altar cloth -- I'm assuming she means the fair linen -- laid over the priest before the (Roman Catholic) Good Friday Liturgy.
              > >
              > > Anyone?
              > >
              > > Lew
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
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