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Re: Intinction is the danger

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  • LauraP
    I was told by Hubby no one reported it, so you can t prove anything. I have talked to the priest about it before Easter this year, and he s willing to talk to
    Message 1 of 37 , May 17, 2013
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      I was told by Hubby no one reported it, so you can't prove anything. I have talked to the priest about it before Easter this year, and he's willing to talk to my husband.

      The church I attend is in Etobicoke as well. it's on Lake Shore Blvd West between Kipling and Brown's Line, next to Tim Horton's. I will be attending this weekend with my daughter. Hubby is at a conference. LauraP.
      --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Frank Senn <fcsenn@...>
      > Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] LauraP Newbie
      >
      > As between receiving from the spoon or from the chalice, there's little
      > difference in terms of physical contact. You're putting your mouth where
      > someone else's mouth has been. But no epidemics have been reported in
      > connection with Holy Communion---not in the U.S., not in Canada, not
      > anywhere in the world. That's a miracle in itself.
      >
      >
      > After the SARS crisis in Toronto, the College of Bishops commissioned a
      > comprehensive medical study of the risks around the common cup. The results
      > surprised everyone. The risk of transmission of contagion by the common cup
      > was very low. What was was very high was the practice of intinction. The
      > dipping of bread into the cup means that fingers touch the cup and the wine
      > and that is raises the risk. In fact, the practice of intinction brings
      > into play the single most risky agent: the fingers of children. Ironically,
      > parents who think they are protecting their children through intinction are
      > exposing them to a serious source of germs. The College prohibited
      > intinction but it has proved difficult to convince people. Yet ask yourself
      > if you want your mouth to touch a surface that has been touched by someone's
      > fingers. I won't receive the cup if general intinction is alllowed. Churches
      > where it is the norm are being irresponsible.
      >
      > The reports are archived on the website of the Diocese of Toronto:
      > http://www.toronto.anglican.ca/
      >
      > Doug Cowling
      > Director of Music
      > St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
      > Toronto
      >
    • LauraP
      I was told by Hubby no one reported it, so you can t prove anything. I have talked to the priest about it before Easter this year, and he s willing to talk to
      Message 37 of 37 , May 17, 2013
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        I was told by Hubby no one reported it, so you can't prove anything. I have talked to the priest about it before Easter this year, and he's willing to talk to my husband.

        The church I attend is in Etobicoke as well. it's on Lake Shore Blvd West between Kipling and Brown's Line, next to Tim Horton's. I will be attending this weekend with my daughter. Hubby is at a conference. LauraP.
        --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: Frank Senn <fcsenn@...>
        > Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] LauraP Newbie
        >
        > As between receiving from the spoon or from the chalice, there's little
        > difference in terms of physical contact. You're putting your mouth where
        > someone else's mouth has been. But no epidemics have been reported in
        > connection with Holy Communion---not in the U.S., not in Canada, not
        > anywhere in the world. That's a miracle in itself.
        >
        >
        > After the SARS crisis in Toronto, the College of Bishops commissioned a
        > comprehensive medical study of the risks around the common cup. The results
        > surprised everyone. The risk of transmission of contagion by the common cup
        > was very low. What was was very high was the practice of intinction. The
        > dipping of bread into the cup means that fingers touch the cup and the wine
        > and that is raises the risk. In fact, the practice of intinction brings
        > into play the single most risky agent: the fingers of children. Ironically,
        > parents who think they are protecting their children through intinction are
        > exposing them to a serious source of germs. The College prohibited
        > intinction but it has proved difficult to convince people. Yet ask yourself
        > if you want your mouth to touch a surface that has been touched by someone's
        > fingers. I won't receive the cup if general intinction is alllowed. Churches
        > where it is the norm are being irresponsible.
        >
        > The reports are archived on the website of the Diocese of Toronto:
        > http://www.toronto.anglican.ca/
        >
        > Doug Cowling
        > Director of Music
        > St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
        > Toronto
        >
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