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Re: [liturgy-l] Imposition of Ashes

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  • Scott Knitter
    Interesting question! In the USA, the 1979 Book of Common Prayer doesn t actually specify who imposes the ashes: (p. 265) If ashes are to be imposed, the
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 4, 2013
      Interesting question! In the USA, the 1979 Book of Common Prayer doesn't actually specify who imposes the ashes: (p. 265)

      If ashes are to be imposed, the Celebrant says the following prayer:

      [text of the prayer]

      The ashes are imposed with the following words:

      Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.

      ...So the passive voice here tells me the door is open to priests other than the Celebrant, to deacons, and to lay people to impose the ashes. The rubric could easily have said, "The Celebrant [and assisting priests] impose the ashes with the following words," but it doesn't.

      On Mon, Feb 4, 2013 at 7:48 PM, Emil Salim <pilsup@...> wrote:


      Greetings,

      I've been a lurker for a long time, but have learned a lot from the discussions here. Just a simple question from me now: in the Anglican tradition, would it be permissible for lay ministers to impose ashes during the Ash Wednesday service? If the answer is positive, the argument can't simply be "because it is not a sacrament", for other non-sacramental ceremonies in the church (e.g., matrimony) are still performed only by a priest. Thank you.

      pax tecum,
      Emil 



    • Jim .
      RCC allows extraordinary (lay) Eucharistic ministers to impose ashes. To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com From: pilsup@gmail.com Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2013 08:48:50 +0700
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 5, 2013

        RCC allows extraordinary (lay) Eucharistic ministers to impose ashes.


        To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
        From: pilsup@...
        Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2013 08:48:50 +0700
        Subject: [liturgy-l] Imposition of Ashes

         
        Greetings,

        I've been a lurker for a long time, but have learned a lot from the discussions here. Just a simple question from me now: in the Anglican tradition, would it be permissible for lay ministers to impose ashes during the Ash Wednesday service? If the answer is positive, the argument can't simply be "because it is not a sacrament", for other non-sacramental ceremonies in the church (e.g., matrimony) are still performed only by a priest. Thank you.

        pax tecum,
        Emil 

      • Emil Salim
        Hi Scott, This is a side question: in 1979 BCP, it seems that if there is no Communion following the imposition of ashes, the service ends with the Peace being
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 10, 2013
          Hi Scott,

          This is a side question: in 1979 BCP, it seems that if there is no Communion following the imposition of ashes, the service ends with the Peace being exchanged. Is this correct? It just feels a little too abrupt to me. Thank you.

          Emil

          On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 8:57 AM, Scott Knitter <scott.knitter@...> wrote:
           

          Interesting question! In the USA, the 1979 Book of Common Prayer doesn't actually specify who imposes the ashes: (p. 265)


          If ashes are to be imposed, the Celebrant says the following prayer:

          [text of the prayer]

          The ashes are imposed with the following words:

          Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.

          ...So the passive voice here tells me the door is open to priests other than the Celebrant, to deacons, and to lay people to impose the ashes. The rubric could easily have said, "The Celebrant [and assisting priests] impose the ashes with the following words," but it doesn't.

        • George Carlson
          That s the way I read the rubrics too, though I have never attended an Imposition (in a church) that was not followed by Communion., Perhaps others can
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 10, 2013

            That’s the way I read the rubrics too, though I have never attended an Imposition (in a church) that was not followed by Communion.,  Perhaps others can comment on “street” imposition.

             

            George Carlson

            St. Paul’s, TEC

            Murfreesboro, TN

             

            From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Emil Salim
            Sent: Monday, February 11, 2013 1:25 AM
            To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Imposition of Ashes

             

             

            Hi Scott,

             

            This is a side question: in 1979 BCP, it seems that if there is no Communion following the imposition of ashes, the service ends with the Peace being exchanged. Is this correct? It just feels a little too abrupt to me. Thank you.

             

            Emil

            On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 8:57 AM, Scott Knitter <scott.knitter@...> wrote:

             

            Interesting question! In the USA, the 1979 Book of Common Prayer doesn't actually specify who imposes the ashes: (p. 265)

             

            If ashes are to be imposed, the Celebrant says the following prayer:

             

            [text of the prayer]

             

            The ashes are imposed with the following words:

             

            Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.

             

            ...So the passive voice here tells me the door is open to priests other than the Celebrant, to deacons, and to lay people to impose the ashes. The rubric could easily have said, "The Celebrant [and assisting priests] impose the ashes with the following words," but it doesn't.

             

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