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Re: Ethiopian Orthodox Christmas

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  • James
    thanks for the information, doug. I remember hearing of some Anglican clergy going to an Ethiopian feast. The natives couldn t believe that the westerners
    Message 1 of 237 , Jan 2, 2013
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      thanks for the information, doug. I remember hearing of some Anglican clergy going to an Ethiopian feast. The 'natives' couldn't believe that the westerners were priests since they didn't have umbrellas!

      different strokes for different folks, and they aren't giving up their Ark for nobody!

      Rdr. James Morgan

      --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 12/31/12 1:33 PM, "AnnaMarie Hoos" <annamarieh@...> wrote:
      >
      > > And in Ethiopia, they observe the Epiphany with the baptism of Jesus, on
      > > January 19th, at the feast of Timkat. Look up the processions on YouTube ­
      > > there is nothing like them in the US, at least.
      > >
      > As a reserved, fuss-assed Canadian Anglican, I was totally unprepared for
      > the astonishing SENSUALITY of the Ethiopian liturgy. I was already amazed
      > at the two circles of men and women dancers who drummed danced liked
      > competing psalm verses. And then the deacon came out through the curtain
      > with the Gospel book and the women began to ululate to welcome the Lord in
      > his Word. Everyone raised umbrellas decorated with coloured streams and
      > tinsel ­ guarding Christ the visitor from the sun ‹ and escorted the deacon
      > around the church.
      >
      > The two groups of dancers actually continued to dance in revolving circles
      > as they led the procession with clergy shaking pharonic sistra. There were
      > two thurifers pouring out a Cloud of Unknowing. As the deacon approached, I
      > could see two women bowing low, almost to the floor. Then I realized that
      > they both had huge atomizers of perfume and were perfuming the path of the
      > Gospel.
      >
      > It was then that I realized that the movement and colour and music which I
      > had always associated with Afro-American protestant worship was much MUCH
      > older. And I also realized that our Western worship is so text-bound that we
      > have forgotten that God gave us five senses to worship with.
      >
      > Happy New Year to all.
      >
      > Doug Cowling
      > Director of Music
      > St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
      > Toronto
      >
    • James
      thanks for the information, doug. I remember hearing of some Anglican clergy going to an Ethiopian feast. The natives couldn t believe that the westerners
      Message 237 of 237 , Jan 2, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        thanks for the information, doug. I remember hearing of some Anglican clergy going to an Ethiopian feast. The 'natives' couldn't believe that the westerners were priests since they didn't have umbrellas!

        different strokes for different folks, and they aren't giving up their Ark for nobody!

        Rdr. James Morgan

        --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 12/31/12 1:33 PM, "AnnaMarie Hoos" <annamarieh@...> wrote:
        >
        > > And in Ethiopia, they observe the Epiphany with the baptism of Jesus, on
        > > January 19th, at the feast of Timkat. Look up the processions on YouTube ­
        > > there is nothing like them in the US, at least.
        > >
        > As a reserved, fuss-assed Canadian Anglican, I was totally unprepared for
        > the astonishing SENSUALITY of the Ethiopian liturgy. I was already amazed
        > at the two circles of men and women dancers who drummed danced liked
        > competing psalm verses. And then the deacon came out through the curtain
        > with the Gospel book and the women began to ululate to welcome the Lord in
        > his Word. Everyone raised umbrellas decorated with coloured streams and
        > tinsel ­ guarding Christ the visitor from the sun ‹ and escorted the deacon
        > around the church.
        >
        > The two groups of dancers actually continued to dance in revolving circles
        > as they led the procession with clergy shaking pharonic sistra. There were
        > two thurifers pouring out a Cloud of Unknowing. As the deacon approached, I
        > could see two women bowing low, almost to the floor. Then I realized that
        > they both had huge atomizers of perfume and were perfuming the path of the
        > Gospel.
        >
        > It was then that I realized that the movement and colour and music which I
        > had always associated with Afro-American protestant worship was much MUCH
        > older. And I also realized that our Western worship is so text-bound that we
        > have forgotten that God gave us five senses to worship with.
        >
        > Happy New Year to all.
        >
        > Doug Cowling
        > Director of Music
        > St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
        > Toronto
        >
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