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Re: [liturgy-l] High Mass

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  • Lewis H. Whitaker
    I must be missing something. How is it a profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation? Lew
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 9, 2012
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      I must be missing something. How is it a "profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation?"

      Lew



      On Mar 8, 2012, at 5:29 PM, dlewisaao@... wrote:

      On Christmas Day it is a very profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation.  Have been there and done it and it is.  Immediately following Mass is not usually a good time liturgically for Benediction, but this makes sense.
       
      David
       
      ---------------------------
      David Lewis
      dlewisaao@...
       
      In a message dated 3/8/2012 4:54:34 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lhwhitaker@... writes:


      It seems a little superfluous. What greater blessing can one get than receiving communion? Putting it at the end of mass seems unnecessary. 




      On Mar 8, 2012, at 4:38 PM, dlewisaao@... wrote:

      I would think rarely offered in this context these days.  At my former Episcopal parish, Benediction was added to the Christmas Day Procession & Solemn High Mass when Christmas Day fell on a Sunday or Monday.  It came across as a very appropriate liturgical exclamation point for this feast.
       
      David
       
      ---------------------------
      David Lewis
      dlewisaao@...
       
      In a message dated 3/8/2012 3:48:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lhwhitaker@... writes:


      While perusing offerings for Easter, I've found that one parish is offering a "Procession and Solemn Pontifical Mass with Solemn Pontifical Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament."

      This seems to be a tad much to me.... the liturgical equivalent of "pulling out all of the stops."

      Is Benediction usually offered in the context of Mass, whether it be solemn and pontifical or not? I thought Benediction was an extra-liturgical offering.

      Lew
    • Scott Knitter
      I liked this blog post on Benediction... http://thinkingreed.wordpress.com/2007/08/13/macquarrie-on-benediction-of-the-blessed-sacrament/
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 9, 2012
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      • Sean W. Reed
        Perhaps being reflective of the tangible manner in which the incarnate Christ is substantially present with us. The Eucharistic Species is the Body, Blood,
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 9, 2012
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          Perhaps being reflective of the tangible manner in which the incarnate Christ is substantially present with us.  The Eucharistic Species is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ.

          As St. Cyril of Jerusalem reminds us "what was formerly bread is bread no more."

          SWR

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Mar 9, 2012, at 8:16 AM, "Lewis H. Whitaker" <lhwhitaker@...> wrote:

           

          I must be missing something. How is it a "profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation?"

          Lew



          On Mar 8, 2012, at 5:29 PM, dlewisaao@... wrote:

          On Christmas Day it is a very profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation.  Have been there and done it and it is.  Immediately following Mass is not usually a good time liturgically for Benediction, but this makes sense.
           
          David
           
          ---------------------------
          David Lewis
          dlewisaao@...
           
          In a message dated 3/8/2012 4:54:34 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lhwhitaker@... writes:


          It seems a little superfluous. What greater blessing can one get than receiving communion? Putting it at the end of mass seems unnecessary. 




          On Mar 8, 2012, at 4:38 PM, dlewisaao@... wrote:

          I would think rarely offered in this context these days.  At my former Episcopal parish, Benediction was added to the Christmas Day Procession & Solemn High Mass when Christmas Day fell on a Sunday or Monday.  It came across as a very appropriate liturgical exclamation point for this feast.
           
          David
           
          ---------------------------
          David Lewis
          dlewisaao@...
           
          In a message dated 3/8/2012 3:48:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lhwhitaker@... writes:


          While perusing offerings for Easter, I've found that one parish is offering a "Procession and Solemn Pontifical Mass with Solemn Pontifical Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament."

          This seems to be a tad much to me.... the liturgical equivalent of "pulling out all of the stops."

          Is Benediction usually offered in the context of Mass, whether it be solemn and pontifical or not? I thought Benediction was an extra-liturgical offering.

          Lew

        • dlewisaao@aol.com
          Exactly - better than I could have said it. David ... David Lewis dlewisaao@aol.com In a message dated 3/9/2012 9:37:50 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 9, 2012
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            Exactly - better than I could have said it.
             
            David
             
            ---------------------------
            David Lewis
            dlewisaao@...
             
            In a message dated 3/9/2012 9:37:50 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, anglican@... writes:


            Perhaps being reflective of the tangible manner in which the incarnate Christ is substantially present with us.  The Eucharistic Species is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ.

            As St. Cyril of Jerusalem reminds us "what was formerly bread is bread no more."

            SWR

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Mar 9, 2012, at 8:16 AM, "Lewis H. Whitaker" <lhwhitaker@...> wrote:

             

            I must be missing something. How is it a "profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation?"

            Lew



            On Mar 8, 2012, at 5:29 PM, dlewisaao@... wrote:

            On Christmas Day it is a very profound liturgical exclamation of the Incarnation.  Have been there and done it and it is.  Immediately following Mass is not usually a good time liturgically for Benediction, but this makes sense.
             
            David
             
            ---------------------------
            David Lewis
            dlewisaao@...
             
            In a message dated 3/8/2012 4:54:34 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lhwhitaker@... writes:


            It seems a little superfluous. What greater blessing can one get than receiving communion? Putting it at the end of mass seems unnecessary. 




            On Mar 8, 2012, at 4:38 PM, dlewisaao@... wrote:

            I would think rarely offered in this context these days.  At my former Episcopal parish, Benediction was added to the Christmas Day Procession & Solemn High Mass when Christmas Day fell on a Sunday or Monday.  It came across as a very appropriate liturgical exclamation point for this feast.
             
            David
             
            ---------------------------
            David Lewis
            dlewisaao@...
             
            In a message dated 3/8/2012 3:48:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lhwhitaker@... writes:


            While perusing offerings for Easter, I've found that one parish is offering a "Procession and Solemn Pontifical Mass with Solemn Pontifical Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament."

            This seems to be a tad much to me.... the liturgical equivalent of "pulling out all of the stops."

            Is Benediction usually offered in the context of Mass, whether it be solemn and pontifical or not? I thought Benediction was an extra-liturgical offering.

            Lew

          • Douglas Cowling
            ... ³Ritual Notes² (the Anglican Fortescue) gets quite snippy about correcting ³abuses² at Corpus Christi which leads the reader to imagine all kinds of
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 9, 2012
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              Re: [liturgy-l] Corpus Christi On 3/9/12 9:03 AM, "David J Strang" <davidjstrang@...> wrote:

              They do the procession with canopy complete with little girls in white dresses scattering rose petals and the double thurifers, one of whom processes backwards


                  “Ritual Notes” (the Anglican Fortescue) gets quite snippy about correcting “abuses” at Corpus Christi which leads the reader to imagine all kinds of anglo-catholic high jinks.  They are quite adamant that the flower girls should not walk among the clergy and there should only be two thurifers (!!)  No one should walk backwards.  

              I remember reading somewhere (where do I find this trivia!) that the 19th century French were particularly vigilant about reversed liturgical positions and movements because of the incidence of black masses at the Bourbon court under the ancien regime.  Liturgical satire has a long French pedigree. The celebrations to the goddess Reason in Notre Dame in the 1790’s were recognized as particularly Gallic satire.

              Doug Cowling
              Director of Music
              St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
              Toronto

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