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Liturgy and Play

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  • Ian Gomersall
    Doug s lovely post about the doves at the rite of canonisation reminded me of a chapter in Guardidni s The Spirit of the Liturgy about the playfulness of the
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 2, 2011
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      Doug's lovely post about the doves at the rite of canonisation reminded me
      of a chapter in Guardidni's 'The Spirit of the Liturgy' about the
      playfulness of the Liturgy.

      Its a chapter that has always made me think, and inspired me too.

      I like the image of liturgy being like building like children building
      sandcastles while a delighted parent looks on.

      Here is a question for a Summer thread: I wonder what other elements of fun
      or play in liturgy we've encountered or heard of?

      Ian
      Censing angels on our church blog: http://wp.me/ptISx-dM


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Michael Thannisch
      I ve always enjoyed swinging the thurible, especially Queen Annes. Shalom b Yeshua haMoshiach   +Mar Michael Abportus mjthannisch@sbcglobal.net Pastor,
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 2, 2011
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        I've always enjoyed swinging the thurible, especially Queen Annes.

        Shalom b'Yeshua haMoshiach   +Mar Michael Abportus mjthannisch@... Pastor, Congregation Benim Avraham http://www.freewebs.com/childrenofabraham/
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        --- On Tue, 8/2/11, Ian Gomersall <ian.gomersall@...> wrote:

        From: Ian Gomersall <ian.gomersall@...>
        Subject: [liturgy-l] Liturgy and Play
        To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 4:24 PM
















         









        Doug's lovely post about the doves at the rite of canonisation reminded me

        of a chapter in Guardidni's 'The Spirit of the Liturgy' about the

        playfulness of the Liturgy.



        Its a chapter that has always made me think, and inspired me too.



        I like the image of liturgy being like building like children building

        sandcastles while a delighted parent looks on.



        Here is a question for a Summer thread: I wonder what other elements of fun

        or play in liturgy we've encountered or heard of?



        Ian

        Censing angels on our church blog: http://wp.me/ptISx-dM



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ian Gomersall
        I ve always treasured the comparison between Liturgy and Play. Is that something others have given thought to? Here is a reflection on it from our church which
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 9
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          I've always treasured the comparison between Liturgy and Play.

          Is that something others have given thought to?

          Here is a reflection on it from our church which may provoke comment.

          I'd be interested in thoughts ...



          Ian Gomersall


        • Bob Eldan
          I like the idea of liturgy as play. However, I always heard that the word liturgy literally from the Greek means work of the people. I never saw it as
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 9
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            I like the idea of liturgy as play.  However, I always heard that the word "liturgy" literally from the Greek means "work" of the people.  I never saw it as work.
             
            Bob Eldan
          • Ian Gomersall
            Yes, I too hear about liturgy as work I think I d like to see that more as occupation of the people - which can be play! Ian
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 9
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              Yes, I too hear about liturgy as 'work' I think I'd like to see that more as 'occupation' of the people - which can be play!

              Ian



              Ian Gomersall




              On 9 January 2014 16:26, Bob Eldan <eldan@...> wrote:
               

              I like the idea of liturgy as play.  However, I always heard that the word "liturgy" literally from the Greek means "work" of the people.  I never saw it as work.
               
              Bob Eldan


            • Ormonde Plater
              The standard study in this field is Johann Huizinga s Homo Ludens (1938), or, for a summary of his argument, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_Ludens_(book).
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 9
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                The standard study in this field is Johann Huizinga’s Homo Ludens (1938), or, for a summary of his argument, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_Ludens_(book). His description of play sounds a lot like ritual.

                Ormonde Plater

              • Michael T. Hiller
                For an excellent discussion of liturgy as play read Jehan Huizinga s Homo Ludens The Rev. Fr. Michael T. Hiller, SCP, Phone: 415.468.1001 Cell: 415.999.8606
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 9
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                  For an excellent discussion of liturgy as play read Jehan Huizinga's "Homo Ludens"

                  The Rev. Fr. Michael T. Hiller, SCP, Phone: 415.468.1001 Cell: 415.999.8606 Email: priestly@... Website: http://www.hillerleiturgia.com

                  --- ian.gomersall@... wrote:

                  From: Ian Gomersall <ian.gomersall@...>
                  To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Liturgy and Play
                  Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2014 16:44:56 +0000



                  Yes, I too hear about liturgy as 'work' I think I'd like to see that more as 'occupation' of the people - which can be play!

                  Ian



                  Ian Gomersall




                  On 9 January 2014 16:26, Bob Eldan <eldan@...> wrote:
                   

                  I like the idea of liturgy as play.  However, I always heard that the word "liturgy" literally from the Greek means "work" of the people.  I never saw it as work.
                   
                  Bob Eldan




                • Douglas Cowling
                  From: Michael T. Hiller Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Liturgy and Play For an excellent discussion of liturgy as play read Jehan
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 9
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                    From: "Michael T. Hiller" <priestly@...>
                    Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Liturgy and Play

                    For an excellent discussion of liturgy as play read Jehan Huizinga's "Homo Ludens"


                    O. B. Hardison, Jr., Christian Rite and Christian Drama in the Middle Ages (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1965)

                    Hardison looks at the emergence of Western drama from the essential playfulness of the liturgy.

                    Doug Cowling
                    Director of Music
                    St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
                    Toronto


                  • jamesoregan
                    Richard McCall s Do This makes a very good case for the use of liturgical drama as the lay response to an otherwise hidden highly clerical liturgy during the
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 17
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                      Richard McCall's Do This  makes a very good case for the use of liturgical drama as the lay response to an otherwise hidden highly clerical liturgy during the middle ages. Thus the playing becomes a (para)liturgical amen. 


                      James O'Regan

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