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Feast of Stephen

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  • William Renwick
    I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence to Sunday,
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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      I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave precedence to prominent saints' days.)

      William Renwick
      renwick@...
      School of the Arts
      McMaster University
      Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2 http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm
    • Lewis Whitaker
      Do the modern rubrics still allow Stephen, John and the Holy Innocents to be transferred in a block in the case of a Sunday intervening? If I m not mistaken,
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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        Do the modern rubrics still allow Stephen, John and the Holy Innocents to be
        transferred in a block in the case of a Sunday intervening? If I'm not
        mistaken, one had the option of (in the case of this year) observing them in
        order, rather than skipping Stephen and picking up St. John tomorrow....

        Lew

        On Sun, Dec 26, 2010 at 4:18 PM, William Renwick <
        renwick@...> wrote:

        > I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated
        > the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence
        > to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave
        > precedence to prominent saints' days.)
        >
        > William Renwick
        > renwick@...
        > School of the Arts
        > McMaster University
        > Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2
        > http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm<http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/%7Erenwick/wr.htm>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To write to the moderators, please email:
        > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dlewisaao@aol.com
        In the Episcopal Church, as this year they would be transferred in a block in the order of occurrence, since a Sunday would have precedence over feasts of
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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          In the Episcopal Church, as this year they would be transferred in a block
          in the order of occurrence, since a Sunday would have precedence over
          feasts of this rank. This makes sense in that all three "witness days" are
          observed in addition to a Christmas Sunday.

          David


          In a message dated 12/26/2010 4:36:38 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          lhwhitaker@... writes:

          Do the modern rubrics still allow Stephen, John and the Holy Innocents to
          be
          transferred in a block in the case of a Sunday intervening? If I'm not
          mistaken, one had the option of (in the case of this year) observing them
          in
          order, rather than skipping Stephen and picking up St. John tomorrow....

          Lew

          On Sun, Dec 26, 2010 at 4:18 PM, William Renwick <
          renwick@...> wrote:

          > I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated
          > the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give
          precedence
          > to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave
          > precedence to prominent saints' days.)
          >
          > William Renwick
          > renwick@...
          > School of the Arts
          > McMaster University
          > Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2
          >
          http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm<http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/%7Erenwick/wr.htm>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To write to the moderators, please email:
          > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

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          To write to the moderators, please email:
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • James
          In my youth, I heard that St. Stephen represented baptism by blood, St. John, baptism by water, and the Holy Innocents, baptism by desire. the three feasts
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 26, 2010
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            In my youth, I heard that St. Stephen represented baptism by blood, St. John, baptism by water, and the Holy Innocents, baptism by desire.

            the three feasts following Christmas in the western calendar.

            Anyone else heard that?

            Rdr. James

            --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, "William Renwick" <renwick@...> wrote:
            >
            > I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave precedence to prominent saints' days.)
            >
            > William Renwick
            > renwick@...
            > School of the Arts
            > McMaster University
            > Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2 http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm
            >
          • Frank Senn
            We also at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Evanston celebrated the Feast of Stephen---on a morning when the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and even.   I
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
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              We also at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Evanston celebrated the Feast of Stephen---on a morning when "the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and even."  I left the white and gold Christmas paraments on the altar and pulpit and placed the blood red stripes from our Holy Week array over them and wore our passion red chasuble.  "What Child Is This?" made a good hymn of the day, connecting the nativity with the passion of Christ.  At coffee hour after the liturgy we had Boxing Day, sharing cookies and treats, and sang "Good King Wenceslas."

              Frank C. Senn

              --- On Sun, 12/26/10, William Renwick <renwick@...> wrote:

              From: William Renwick <renwick@...>
              Subject: [liturgy-l] Feast of Stephen
              To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, December 26, 2010, 3:18 PM







               









              I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave precedence to prominent saints' days.)



              William Renwick

              renwick@...

              School of the Arts

              McMaster University

              Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2 http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm
























              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Douglas Cowling
              On 12/27/10 8:11 AM, Frank Senn wrote: We also at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Evanston celebrated the Feast of Stephen---on a morning
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
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                On 12/27/10 8:11 AM, "Frank Senn" <fcsenn@...> wrote:

                We also at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Evanston celebrated the Feast of
                Stephen---on a morning when "the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and
                even."  I left the white and gold Christmas paraments on the altar and
                pulpit and placed the blood red stripes from our Holy Week array over them
                and wore our passion red chasuble.


                Christmas fell on a Saturday both in 2010 and in 1734, the year that Bach
                wrote the Christmas Oratorio. The oratorio is actually six cantatas which
                spread the gospel narrative over the Twelve Days of Christmas:

                Saturday, December 25 - 1st Day of Christmas (Part One)
                Sunday, December 26 - 2nd Day of Christmas (Part Two)
                Monday, December 27 - 3rd Day of Christmas (Part Three)
                Saturday, January 1 - New Year's Day (Part Four)
                Sunday, January 2 - Sunday after New Year's (Part Five)
                Thursday, January 6 - Epiphany (Part Six)

                Interestingly, in other years, Bach usually observed St. Stephen's Day for
                which he wrote such incomparable cantatas as "Selig ist der Mann" (BWV 57).
                However, it appears that when Dec 26 fell on a Sunday that the 2nd Day of
                Christmas bumped the Protomartyr.

                The bizarrest and most sublime occurrence in Bach's calendar was the year
                that the Annunciation fell on Palm Sunday when there was normally no cantata
                (Passion in the afternoon). For that year, Bach produced "Himmelskönig sei
                Willkommen" (BWV 182) which combines the entry into Jerusalem with the
                Incarnation.

                I would love to hear Frank preach on these calendrical and theological
                mysteries.

                Happy St. John's Day!

                "There cam a ship fair sailland then,
                Sanct Michael was the stieresman,
                Sanct John sat in the horn.
                Our Lord harpit, our Lady sang
                And all the bells of heav'n they rang
                On Christsonday at morn."

                Doug Cowling
                Director of Music
                St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
                Toronto
              • Frank Senn
                Wow!  I always wondered why Bach ignored Stephen s Day in the Christmas Oratorio but not Holy Innocents Day. Actually, I thought the martyrdom of Stephen
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
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                  Wow!  I always wondered why Bach ignored Stephen's Day in the Christmas Oratorio but not Holy Innocents' Day.

                  Actually, I thought the martyrdom of Stephen went better with Sunday than Christmas I would have, because of the themes of resurrection and eternal life.  In my sermon I connected Stephen's beatific vision with all the references to heaven in children's Christmas carols.  I'll have that sermon posted on the curch web site before the week is out.  I have a lot of family coming and going these days and it's hard to get any work done.

                  Today is St. John's Day.  We will bless our wine supply for the year and sample some of it at dinner tonight.

                  Frank C. Senn

                  --- On Mon, 12/27/10, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:

                  From: Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...>
                  Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Senn vs. Bach
                  To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, December 27, 2010, 10:51 AM







                   









                  On 12/27/10 8:11 AM, "Frank Senn" <fcsenn@...> wrote:



                  We also at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Evanston celebrated the Feast of

                  Stephen---on a morning when "the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and

                  even."  I left the white and gold Christmas paraments on the altar and

                  pulpit and placed the blood red stripes from our Holy Week array over them

                  and wore our passion red chasuble.



                  Christmas fell on a Saturday both in 2010 and in 1734, the year that Bach

                  wrote the Christmas Oratorio. The oratorio is actually six cantatas which

                  spread the gospel narrative over the Twelve Days of Christmas:



                  Saturday, December 25 - 1st Day of Christmas (Part One)

                  Sunday, December 26 - 2nd Day of Christmas (Part Two)

                  Monday, December 27 - 3rd Day of Christmas (Part Three)

                  Saturday, January 1 - New Year's Day (Part Four)

                  Sunday, January 2 - Sunday after New Year's (Part Five)

                  Thursday, January 6 - Epiphany (Part Six)



                  Interestingly, in other years, Bach usually observed St. Stephen's Day for

                  which he wrote such incomparable cantatas as "Selig ist der Mann" (BWV 57).

                  However, it appears that when Dec 26 fell on a Sunday that the 2nd Day of

                  Christmas bumped the Protomartyr.



                  The bizarrest and most sublime occurrence in Bach's calendar was the year

                  that the Annunciation fell on Palm Sunday when there was normally no cantata

                  (Passion in the afternoon). For that year, Bach produced "Himmelskönig sei

                  Willkommen" (BWV 182) which combines the entry into Jerusalem with the

                  Incarnation.



                  I would love to hear Frank preach on these calendrical and theological

                  mysteries.



                  Happy St. John's Day!



                  "There cam a ship fair sailland then,

                  Sanct Michael was the stieresman,

                  Sanct John sat in the horn.

                  Our Lord harpit, our Lady sang

                  And all the bells of heav'n they rang

                  On Christsonday at morn."



                  Doug Cowling

                  Director of Music

                  St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke

                  Toronto






















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Carl Fortunato
                  I had heard that Stephen represented martyrdom by will and act; John martyrdom by will only, not act (I think he drank poison but didn t die); and the
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
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                    I had heard that Stephen represented martyrdom by will and act; John martyrdom by will only, not act (I think he drank poison but didn't die); and the Innocents, martyrdom by act but not will.

                    Carl Fortunato

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: James <rdrjames@...>
                    Sent: Sunday, December 26, 2010 9:15 PM
                    To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [liturgy-l] Re: Feast of Stephen

                    In my youth, I heard that St. Stephen represented baptism by blood, St. John, baptism by water, and the Holy Innocents, baptism by desire.

                    the three feasts following Christmas in the western calendar.

                    Anyone else heard that?

                    Rdr. James

                    --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, "William Renwick" <renwick@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave precedence to prominent saints' days.)
                    >
                    > William Renwick
                    > renwick@...
                    > School of the Arts
                    > McMaster University
                    > Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2 http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm
                    >




                    ------------------------------------

                    Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/ To write to the moderators, please email: liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
                  • Lewis Whitaker
                    It all sounds like what Doug calls Anglican Midrash to me. L ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
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                      It all sounds like what Doug calls Anglican Midrash to me.

                      L

                      On Mon, Dec 27, 2010 at 7:47 PM, Carl Fortunato <cfortunato58@...>wrote:

                      > I had heard that Stephen represented martyrdom by will and act; John
                      > martyrdom by will only, not act (I think he drank poison but didn't die);
                      > and the Innocents, martyrdom by act but not will.
                      >
                      > Carl Fortunato
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: James <rdrjames@...>
                      > Sent: Sunday, December 26, 2010 9:15 PM
                      > To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [liturgy-l] Re: Feast of Stephen
                      >
                      > In my youth, I heard that St. Stephen represented baptism by blood, St.
                      > John, baptism by water, and the Holy Innocents, baptism by desire.
                      >
                      > the three feasts following Christmas in the western calendar.
                      >
                      > Anyone else heard that?
                      >
                      > Rdr. James
                      >
                      > --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, "William Renwick" <renwick@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I was surprised and delighted to find that our church actually celebrated
                      > the Feast of Stephen today! (I know that modern liturgies give precedence
                      > to Sunday, but the pre-reformation Sarum liturgy (and others) gave
                      > precedence to prominent saints' days.)
                      > >
                      > > William Renwick
                      > > renwick@...
                      > > School of the Arts
                      > > McMaster University
                      > > Hamilton Ontario CANADA L8S 4M2
                      > http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~renwick/wr.htm<http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/%7Erenwick/wr.htm>
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To write to the moderators, please email:
                      > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To write to the moderators, please email:
                      > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • frpdr
                      We celebrated St Stephen on Sunday and commemorated the Octave, but then we are an old-fashioned sort of a place. Red frontal for the altar and red falls for
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 28, 2010
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                        We celebrated St Stephen on Sunday and commemorated the Octave, but then we are an old-fashioned sort of a place. Red frontal for the altar and red falls for the pulpit and lectern. I also wore the bright red set we use for martyrs.

                        The altar guild gets quite a workout this week as they have to change the paraments pretty much everyday this week until Thursday when we settle down to white for a while until the Vigil of Epiphany.

                        +Peter D. Robinson
                        Presiding Bishop, UECNA

                        --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Frank Senn <fcsenn@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > We also at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Evanston celebrated the Feast of Stephen---on a morning when "the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and even."  I left the white and gold Christmas paraments on the altar and pulpit and placed the blood red stripes from our Holy Week array over them and wore our passion red chasuble.  "What Child Is This?" made a good hymn of the day, connecting the nativity with the passion of Christ.  At coffee hour after the liturgy we had Boxing Day, sharing cookies and treats, and sang "Good King Wenceslas."
                        >
                        > Frank C. Senn
                        >
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