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color of mitres

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  • Ormonde Plater
    A week or two ago there was a thread on this topic. Some of it had to do with when southern bishops started wearing mitres, a catholic custom generally
    Message 1 of 6 , May 2, 2010
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      A week or two ago there was a thread on this topic. Some of it had to do
      with when southern bishops started wearing mitres, a catholic custom
      generally conceded to have infiltrated the region within the last generation
      or two.

      I finally got down to Trinity Episcopal Church in New Orleans and looked at
      the photos of former rectors on a wall. One of them, Henry N. Pierce, was
      rector for a few months in 1854. He later became bishop of Arkansas,
      1870-1899 (when he died). Sure enough, there was a photo of him in cope and
      mitre (a very squat mitre). I'd reproduce it here, but I don't have a copy.

      Ormonde Plater





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Douglas Cowling
      On 5/2/10 5:02 PM, Ormonde Plater wrote: One of them, Henry N. Pierce, was rector for a few months in 1854. He later became bishop of
      Message 2 of 6 , May 2, 2010
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        On 5/2/10 5:02 PM, "Ormonde Plater" <oplater@...> wrote:

        One of them, Henry N. Pierce, was rector for a few months in 1854. He later
        became bishop of Arkansas, 1870-1899 (when he died). Sure enough, there was
        a photo of him in cope and mitre (a very squat mitre). I'd reproduce it
        here, but I don't have a copy.

        Would you send me a copy please? I collect this kind of thing for comic
        relief at liturgy workshops.

        Cheers,


        Doug Cowling
        Director of Music
        St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
        Toronto
      • James
        Squat mitres are Traditional Anglican. Tall Candle Flame mitres tend to be Armenian. Rdr. james
        Message 3 of 6 , May 2, 2010
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          Squat mitres are Traditional Anglican. Tall Candle Flame mitres tend to be Armenian.
          Rdr. james

          --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 5/2/10 5:02 PM, "Ormonde Plater" <oplater@...> wrote:
          >
          > One of them, Henry N. Pierce, was rector for a few months in 1854. He later
          > became bishop of Arkansas, 1870-1899 (when he died). Sure enough, there was
          > a photo of him in cope and mitre (a very squat mitre). I'd reproduce it
          > here, but I don't have a copy.
          >
          > Would you send me a copy please? I collect this kind of thing for comic
          > relief at liturgy workshops.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          >
          > Doug Cowling
          > Director of Music
          > St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
          > Toronto
          >
        • Tom Poelker
          Can anyone refer me to a site which shows what they mean by square miters? I have always liked the very short miters shown in the movie Becket . Is this what
          Message 4 of 6 , May 5, 2010
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            Can anyone refer me to a site which shows what they mean by square miters?
            I have always liked the very short miters shown in the movie "Becket".
            Is this what you mean?

            The very tall miters, more than 2.5 to one perhaps, always seem to look
            like the wearer is also likely to be wearing shoes with lifts and be off
            balance in appearance, IMHO.


            *

            Tom Poelker
            St. Louis. Missouri
            USA

            /-- Do all the easy nice things you can.
            It?s nice to see people smile,
            and it?s good practice. --/

            *


            James wrote:
            >
            >
            > Squat mitres are Traditional Anglican. Tall Candle Flame mitres tend
            > to be Armenian.
            > Rdr. james
            >
            > --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com <mailto:liturgy-l%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > On 5/2/10 5:02 PM, "Ormonde Plater" <oplater@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > One of them, Henry N. Pierce, was rector for a few months in 1854.
            > He later
            > > became bishop of Arkansas, 1870-1899 (when he died). Sure enough,
            > there was
            > > a photo of him in cope and mitre (a very squat mitre). I'd reproduce it
            > > here, but I don't have a copy.
            > >
            > > Would you send me a copy please? I collect this kind of thing for comic
            > > relief at liturgy workshops.
            > >
            > > Cheers,
            > >
            > >
            > > Doug Cowling
            > > Director of Music
            > > St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
            > > Toronto
            > >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Douglas Cowling
            ... I loved the scene when Richard Burton in full pontificals intoned Deus in Adjutorium at vespers! Doug Cowling Director of Music St. Philip s Church,
            Message 5 of 6 , May 5, 2010
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              On 5/5/10 11:10 PM, "Tom Poelker" <TomPoelker@...> wrote:

              > I have always liked the very short miters shown in the movie "Becket".

              I loved the scene when Richard Burton in full pontificals intoned "Deus in
              Adjutorium" at vespers!


              Doug Cowling
              Director of Music
              St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
              Toronto
            • Ormonde Plater
              Yes, he sang it in the solemn tone, and then they killed him for his trouble! I was also interested in the deacons in that movie, who wore their stoles over
              Message 6 of 6 , May 6, 2010
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                Yes, he sang it in the solemn tone, and then they killed him for his
                trouble! I was also interested in the deacons in that movie, who wore their
                stoles over their dalmatics, hanging straight down from the left shoulder.
                Probably historically correct, as far as anyone knows.

                Ormonde Plater



                From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of Douglas Cowling
                Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 10:20 PM
                To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Re: color of mitres

                On 5/5/10 11:10 PM, "Tom Poelker" <TomPoelker@...
                <mailto:TomPoelker%40aim.com> > wrote:

                > I have always liked the very short miters shown in the movie "Becket".

                I loved the scene when Richard Burton in full pontificals intoned "Deus in
                Adjutorium" at vespers!

                Doug Cowling
                Director of Music
                St. Philip's Church, Etobicoke
                Toronto



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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