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Re: [liturgy-l] Varieties of Lutherans

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  • John Schultz
    Another smallish one is the Anglo-Lutheran Catholic Church, which I believe uses one of the versions of the BCP, and seeks recognition from Rome. John Schultz
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 1, 2009
      Another smallish one is the Anglo-Lutheran Catholic Church, which I
      believe uses one of the versions of the BCP, and seeks recognition from
      Rome.

      John Schultz

      Scott Knitter wrote:
      > There's a biggish one in Lansing, Michigan, that runs a school and
      > probably still broadcasts its 8 a.m. service on the radio. I used to
      > listen while I got ready to go to my church. Always amazed me how the
      > organist at the time could play every stanza (of the sometimes 10 or
      > 12 stanzas of some of the hymns in The Lutheran Hymnal) with precisely
      > the same registration and tempo. The pastor's preaching style was a
      > bit hard to take, sort of a long harangue. I gather things have
      > lightened up a little since then, and they use the newer Christian
      > Worship hymnal.
      >
      > A dear friend who's a superb organist grew up in a small WELS church
      > near Lansing, and what I remember of it was a whole lot of very robust
      > singing by everyone present. And by robust I mean loud. :)
      >
      > On Mon, Aug 31, 2009 at 8:18 PM, Lewis Whitaker<lhwhitaker@...> wrote:
      >
      >> Wow. I didn't know the WELS was so tiny. They've opened a parish in my
      >> hometown, but I've not checked them out. I probably won't.
      >
    • PETER ROBINSON
      In the Arizona Tri-Cities where I live there are nine Lutheran churches for a population of a little bit over 100,000. These range in size from 120 to 1200
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 1, 2009
        In the Arizona Tri-Cities where I live there are nine Lutheran churches for a population of a little bit over 100,000. These range in size from 120 to 1200 members. Each of the three cities has an ELCA, a LCMS, and a WELS. Around here Lutherans are probably the third of forth biggest grouping after Roman Catholics, Mormons, and possibly Baptists.

        Interestingly, there is still a little bit of a tendancy around here for people to gravitate to certain jurisdictions on the basis of ancestry. For example, there is a high proportion of Scandanavian names at the ELCA (ex-ALC) church in town, but the LCMS is rather flush with German surnames.

        Of course, the various Anglican/Episcopal churches tend to be heavy on people with English, Scots, or Irish ancestry.

        +Peter

        The Right Rev. Peter D. Robinson
        Rector: St Paul's Anglican Church, Prescott, AZ, & Bishop-Suffragan UECNA
        http://www.prescott-anglican.org



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • cantor03@aol.com
        Minnesota and adjacent Western Wisconsin seem to be the epicenter for smaller Lutheran groups with long and varied histories: Evangelical Lutheran Synod:
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 1, 2009
          Minnesota and adjacent Western Wisconsin seem to be
          the epicenter for smaller Lutheran groups with long and
          varied histories:

          Evangelical Lutheran Synod:

          _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evangelical_Lutheran_Synod_
          (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evangelical_Lutheran_Synod)


          Church of the Lutheran Brethren of America:

          _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Lutheran_Brethren_of_America_
          (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Lutheran_Brethren_of_America)


          Church of the Lutheran Confession:

          _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CLC-logo.png_
          (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CLC-logo.png)

          The first two have Norwegian roots, and the CLC, German roots.

          All three small groups had parishes in Eau Claire, Wisconsin,
          a City where I lived for 50 years. The Church of the Lutheran
          Brethren of America is hardly recognizable as Lutheran, at least
          liturgically, and seems to resemble Baptist worship more than
          what I am used to calling Lutheran.


          David Strang.





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • dlewisaao@aol.com
          Then there are some of the contemporary Evangelical/Charismatic parishes within the Anglican Communion in the US (either Episcopal or Anglican Church of North
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 1, 2009
            Then there are some of the contemporary Evangelical/Charismatic parishes
            within the Anglican Communion in the US (either Episcopal or Anglican Church
            of North America) whose worship uses the Prayer Book only incidentally and
            may come across as Misc Protestant. Plus various congregations in the
            United Methodist, Presbyterian, etc Churches that are into praise bands and
            choirs and the words of hymns projected onto a screen ...

            David


            In a message dated 9/1/2009 7:58:41 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            cantor03@... writes:

            All three small groups had parishes in Eau Claire, Wisconsin,
            a City where I lived for 50 years. The Church of the Lutheran
            Brethren of America is hardly recognizable as Lutheran, at least
            liturgically, and seems to resemble Baptist worship more than
            what I am used to calling Lutheran.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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