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Where does it come from?

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  • Nathan Nettleton
    Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which is used by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion: Receive what you are, that
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 29, 2001
      Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which is
      used by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion:

      "Receive what you are, that you may become what you receive."

      or

      "Let us receive what we are. Let us become what we receive: the body of Christ."

      I have heard a suggestion that it may relate to a comment made by St
      Augustine, but I'm not sure. Can anyone tell me anything of its history?

      Peace and hope,

      Nathan

      _____________________________________
      Nathan Nettleton
      Pastor, South Yarra Community Baptist Church
      Melbourne, Australia
      mailto:nathan@...
      _____________________________________
    • Mary Jane Fowler
      ... I have never heard it used in a Roman or Episcopal Eucharist, but I think the quote from St. Augustine may be this: If you are the body of Christ and his
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 29, 2001
        Nathan Nettleton wrote:
        >
        > Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which is
        > used by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion:
        >
        > "Receive what you are, that you may become what you receive."
        >
        > or
        >
        > "Let us receive what we are. Let us become what we receive: the body of Christ."
        >
        > I have heard a suggestion that it may relate to a comment made by St
        > Augustine, but I'm not sure. Can anyone tell me anything of its history?


        I have never heard it used in a Roman or Episcopal Eucharist, but I
        think the quote from St. Augustine may be this:

        "If you are the body of Christ and his members
        it is the mystery of yourselves that is laid upon the altar.
        It is the mystery of yourselves that you receive.
        It is to what you are that you say 'Amen'."

        The reason I have it at hand is that it utterly blows me away: it
        certainly *should* be a part of the eucharistic liturgy. I hope the
        scholars among us can enlighten us about its history.

        MJ Fowler
      • Robert J. Riley
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 31, 2001
          <<<
          Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which is used
          by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion: "Receive what you
          are, that you may become what you receive."
          >>>

          I have it on authority from an Allan Fitzgerald, O.S.A., of the Institutum
          Patristicum Augustinianum, that "The quote you are seeking is in Sermon 272.
          There is only one paragraph in that sermon and it is about half way through
          the text." I found his e-mail address on the website of the Order of St
          Augustine ( http://www.aug.org/ ), and he was kind enough to answer my query
          promptly.

          I don't have a copy of the Sermon.

          Sincerely,
          Robert J. Riley
          mailto:rriley@...

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Nathan Nettleton [mailto:nathan@...]
          Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 5:09 PM
          To: USA Liturgy List; UK Liturgy List; AAL List
          Subject: [liturgy-l] Where does it come from?


          Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which is
          used by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion:

          "Receive what you are, that you may become what you receive."

          or

          "Let us receive what we are. Let us become what we receive: the body of
          Christ."

          I have heard a suggestion that it may relate to a comment made by St
          Augustine, but I'm not sure. Can anyone tell me anything of its history?

          Peace and hope,

          Nathan

          _____________________________________
          Nathan Nettleton
          Pastor, South Yarra Community Baptist Church
          Melbourne, Australia
          mailto:nathan@...
          _____________________________________

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          liturgy-l-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        • rriley@kc.rr.com
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 31, 2001
            <<<
            The quote you are seeking is in Sermon 272.
            >>>

            That is, of St Augustine of Hippo.

            Sincerely,
            Robert J. Riley
            mailto:rriley@...

            --- In liturgy-l@y..., "Robert J. Riley" <rriley@k...> wrote:
            > <<<
            > Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which
            is used
            > by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion: "Receive
            what you
            > are, that you may become what you receive."
            > >>>
            >
            > I have it on authority from an Allan Fitzgerald, O.S.A., of the
            Institutum
            > Patristicum Augustinianum, that "The quote you are seeking is in
            Sermon 272.
            > There is only one paragraph in that sermon and it is about half way
            through
            > the text." I found his e-mail address on the website of the Order
            of St
            > Augustine ( http://www.aug.org/ ), and he was kind enough to answer
            my query
            > promptly.
            >
            > I don't have a copy of the Sermon.
            >
            > Sincerely,
            > Robert J. Riley
            > mailto:rriley@k...
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Nathan Nettleton [mailto:nathan@l...]
            > Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 5:09 PM
            > To: USA Liturgy List; UK Liturgy List; AAL List
            > Subject: [liturgy-l] Where does it come from?
            >
            >
            > Can anyone help me identify the origin of the following line which
            is
            > used by some in the liturgy at the distribution of communion:
            >
            > "Receive what you are, that you may become what you receive."
            >
            > or
            >
            > "Let us receive what we are. Let us become what we receive: the
            body of
            > Christ."
            >
            > I have heard a suggestion that it may relate to a comment made by St
            > Augustine, but I'm not sure. Can anyone tell me anything of its
            history?
            >
            > Peace and hope,
            >
            > Nathan
            >
            > _____________________________________
            > Nathan Nettleton
            > Pastor, South Yarra Community Baptist Church
            > Melbourne, Australia
            > mailto:nathan@l...
            > _____________________________________
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > liturgy-l-unsubscribe@egroups.com
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