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I commend this site to you all

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  • James Morgan
    The Ecclesiological society (unfortunately it is just Great Britain, not international!) has a valuable journal that is available online at:
    Message 1 of 35 , Aug 25, 2008
      The Ecclesiological society (unfortunately it is just Great Britain, not
      international!) has a

      valuable journal that is available online at:

      http://www.ecclsoc.org/

      The last issue available online (Dec 2006 available Feb 2007 had a very
      interesting article on

      Placement of altars in an age of liturgical chaos (Our own age, I'm afraid!)



      Also some very nice photos of churches and altars etc. Mostly Anglican and
      Catholic. They

      Are interested and involved in the preservation of churches. We should be
      too.

      You will like this site, I think.



      Rdr.James Morgan

      Olympia, WA





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Douglas Cowling
      ... The vestiarian customary in the Catholic church wasn t codified until the 19th century with all sorts of interesting cassock and clerical undress across
      Message 35 of 35 , Sep 8, 2008
        On 9/8/08 1:40 AM, "Michael Thannisch" <mjthannisch@...> wrote:

        > Does
        > the CoE maintain canonical sumptuary laws specifying what shades of red
        > to violet and combinations with black in trims may be worn by various
        > ranks of clergy and hierarchy similar to RC rules for non-episcopal
        > monsignori, bishops, archbishops, cardinals on different occasions?


        The vestiarian customary in the Catholic church wasn't codified until the
        19th century with all sorts of interesting cassock and clerical undress
        across Europe. Anglicans have always been more eclectic. Outside of Chapels
        Royal and cathedrals, most clergy wore black gowns until the end of the 19th
        century. Cassocks were considered very high church.

        By the end of the 19th century there were two styles: the Roman button
        up-the-front cassok worn by the ultramontane and the pre-Reformation Sarum
        cassock which has a wide front flap and is buttoned at the shoulder and worn
        with a belt. This still widely used in England. The question of colour is
        a faux-tradition.

        Bishops are a whole other bagatelle. They pretty much maintained their
        pre-Reformation choir habit with lawn-sleeve surplices, rochet and chimeres,
        but not purple cassocks which were not common among Catholics until well
        into the 17th century. Many Anglican prelates did not wear the purple
        cassock until after WWII.

        The great fashion shift came at the first Lambeth Conference after the war.
        The Queen decided to invite all the bishops to a garden party at Buckingham
        Palace.

        Consternation! What to wear?

        British prelates normally wear gaiters as their court costume but few of the
        "colonial" bishops still wore 18th century clerical hunting gear. When
        questioned, the Lord Chamberlain was rather perplexed and finally decided
        the bishops could wear their purple cassocks.

        Consternation! Many bishops didn't own purple cassocks!

        Evidently, the run on clerical haberdasheries was so great that materials
        and cassocks had to be flown in from the States. Low church bishops
        swallowed their principles, and they all appeared in glorious Roman purple
        to sip tea with the Queen.

        Doug Cowling
        Director of Music
        St. Philip's Church, Toronto
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